Seminar on Chinese legal system sheds lights on anicent Chinese wisdom

Grace Ho

Share this article 

Dr Peng-sheng Chiu, Research Fellow of Academia Sinica, Taiwan, is visiting  City University of Hong Kong, 15-19 March. A highlight of his five-day visit is a seminar on Chinese legal study, , on 17 March, at the Chinese Civilisation Centre AV Room, 6/F, AmenitiesBuilding.

 

Dr Chiu’s seminar, entitled “ Classification and Structure: A Study of the Legal Knowledge and Learning in Ming & Qing Dynasties in China”, is jointly organised by the Run Run Shaw Library, the Chinese Civilisation Centre and the School of Law. He will compare different types of legal literature that emerged during the Ming and Qing Dynasties (1368-1911). “While comparing the differences and similarities of ‘Shuotie’, ‘Lüxue’, ‘Muxue’ and ‘Songshi Miben’, I will try to explain the judicial institution under which these legal materials were produced and also attempt to unveil the vary beliefs with which these materials were consumed,” said Dr Chiu. “Hopefully, this seminar will shed some light on the evolution of legal knowledge and learning in China during the Ming and Qing Dynasties.” Chinese legal history contains wisdom from ancient times that is of great value to people nowadays. Dr Chiu aims to help the audience better understand Chinese law and culture.

 

In addition to conducting the seminar and exchanges with CityU staff, Dr Chiu will help review and further develop the Library’s Chinese Legal History Special Collection. Located in the Law Section of the Library, the Chinese Legal History Special Collection was established in 1998 to promote and support academic study and research activities in Chinese traditional legal culture. The Collection covers history texts and historical records as well as scholarly works, spanning from ancient China to 1949. It is open to all CityU staff, students and holders of identification that is recognized by the Library.


 

YOU MAY BE INTERESTED

Contact Information

Communications and Public Relations Office

Back to top