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Breakthrough technology indicates earlier detection for Alzheimer’s disease
A research team co-led by a scientist at CityU has discovered a new, non-invasive way to detect early-stage Alzheimer’s disease, helping patients get the necessary treatments around 10 years before any symptoms appear.
New ventilation system helps protect healthcare workers from Covid-19 infection
Professor John Lin from the Division of Building Science and Technology has invented a stratum ventilation system that provides fresh air for healthcare staff inside a ward.
SMEs (small and medium-sized enterprises) tend to seek short-term survival strategies in an economic downturn. However, such strategies are not good enough to support a business in the long term.
Medical staff wears protective face masks and gowns when working in wards for highly infectious diseases such as SARS. But how can a virus be prevented from transferring from the clothing into the public? And how can we ensure that medical staff will not contract a virus as the clothing is removed? An "air shower" facility currently under development by the Department of Building and Construction (BC) may provide a solution.
Hong Kong people are more likely to work overtime without complaint than people in Shanghai and Taipei, but they derive less sense of pride from their work, a recent CityU survey showed. The researchers warn that the lack of appreciation Hong Kong people receive for their work might impair their competitiveness in the long term, though they a enjoy competitive edge in the short term, thanks to their willingness to work long hours.
Professor Michael Yang of the Biology and Chemistry Department led a CityU research team to discover an anti-fibrosis and anti-cancer compound called "Fibroscutum" it was announced 3 July. The research project, based on experiments with Wei Jia, an existing Class 1 drug in China, was commissioned by LifeTec Group Limited (LifeTec).
Four grants of over HK$1 million each were awarded to CityU in the latest round of Research Grants Council (RGC) applications. Three projects are related to linguistics and language information sciences, while the fourth is about marine biology.

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