Knowledge Transfer Office

Innovation to Realization Funding Scheme (I2RF)
- Successful Applications closed on 21 April 2013

Innovation to Realization Funding Scheme (I2RF) - Project Title Project Period Project Duration
1 Forging of a Metal Liner into SCWG Vessels by Plasma Nitriding Enhanced by Hollow Cathode Discharge 1/9/2013 - 28/2/2014 6 months
2

The Development of an Enhanced Filter Mechanism Prototype for Signature-based Network Intrusion Detection Systems

1/9/2013 - 30/6/2014 10 months
3 Transdermal Delivery of Growth Factors by Mechanically Strengthened Polymer Microneedle Arrays 1/9/2013 - 31/8/2014 12 months
Enquiry Information:
Mr Tomson Lee, Senior Knowledge Transfer Officer
Address: Knowledge Transfer Office, City University of Hong Kong
Room 2220, 2/F, Cheng Yick-chi Building, Tat Chee Avenue
Kowloon, Hong Kong
Tel: (852) 3442 6441/3442 6821
Fax: (852) 3442 0883
Email: thmlee@cityu.edu.hk


Project Abstract

Project Title: Forging of a Metal Liner into SCWG Vessels by Plasma Nitriding Enhanced by Hollow Cathode Discharge

Abstract

    The objective of this research is to find a material that can significantly extend the useful life of components used in Supercritical water gasification (SCWG).

    SCWG has the potential to be extremely clean and for efficient use of coal resources. However, widespread adoption of SCWG technology is currently held back by the high cost of limited reactor lifespan. The mixture of water, coal, and catalysts reaches a highly corrosive state right before reaching water’s critical point, corroding the reactor and significantly shortening its useful life.

    In order to make SCWG economically viable, either highly resilient material optimized for use in coal SCWG or alternative anti-corrosion methods are necessary.

    Successful outcome of this project will allow further development of economical components in the process of SCWG by potential companies providing a clean and efficient use of the vast reserve of coal in China.

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Project Title: The Development of an Enhanced Filter Mechanism Prototype for Signature-based Network Intrusion Detection Systems

Abstract

    Signature-based network intrusion detection systems (NIDSs) have been widely deployed in current network infrastructure to defend against various network attacks. However, there are three major issues regarding these detection systems: 1) overhead network packets; 2) expensive signature matching; 3) and massive false alarms. These problems can greatly lower the effectiveness and efficiency of such detection systems in a network environment, especially in a large-scale network. For instance, the computational burden of signature matching is at least linear to the size of an incoming string.

    In this project with the purpose of mitigating the above issues, we attempt to develop an enhanced filter mechanism (named EFM), which consists of three major components: a context-aware list-based packet filter, an exclusive signature matching component and a machine-learning-based false alarm filter. This EFM will help reduce the burden of a signature-based NIDSs and reduce the false alarms, without affecting the architecture of such detection systems. In order to verify the effectiveness of such an EFM, we shall design and construct a prototype of EFM that experiments and the validation tasks can be carried out.

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Project Title: Transdermal Delivery of Growth Factors by Mechanically Strengthened Polymer Microneedle Arrays

Abstract

    Growth factors are very important in regulating various cellular processes and can stimulate cellular growth, proliferation, and cellular differentiation. These growth factors are usually proteins, which can be broken down by digestive enzymes or denatured in stomach and therefore cannot be orally administered. Systematic administration by conventional injection often has problem as well because the growth factors have many effects which may be harmful to patients. Therefore, topical administration is desired, particularly for a certain range of applications such as improving wound healing and hair growth as well as reducing wrinkles and acne scars. However, growth factors often have high molecular weights and are not able to diffuse through skin with traditional transdermal patch application because of stratum corneum (the outmost layer of skin) barrier properties. In this project, we aim to use a novel type of mechanically strengthened polymer microneedle patches to achieve transdermal delivery of growth factors. Our approach will have many advantages such as convenience for use, well enhanced drug delivery efficiency and efficacy, and improved safety. In the project, these advantages will be demonstrated by using dissolvable polymer microneedle patches to deliver growth factors for improved wound healing in a mouse model.

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