Archive of Seminars before June 2018

The Multigenerational Oxidative Evolution of Atmospheric Organic Carbon

Professor Jesse H. Kroll

Associate Professor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Department of Chemical Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Date: 24 May 2018 (Thursday)
Time: 3:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
Venue: G5-314, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The oxidation of organic species is central to the chemistry of the atmosphere, playing a major role in the control of oxidant levels, and forming key products such as ozone and secondary organic aerosol. However our understanding of organic oxidation processes is limited by their immense chemical complexity – each oxidation step can form of a large number of product species, each of which can react further to form still more products, and so on over multiple generations of oxidation. This talk will describe laboratory studies aimed at describing the evolving composition of organic oxidation systems, over the equivalent of hours to days in the atmosphere. Organic species are oxidized within an environmental chamber, and reactants, intermediates, and products are measured using a suite of new mass spectrometric instruments, providing a comprehensive picture of the chemical composition of the entire organic mixture. From these combined measurements, the organic species can be described in terms of total carbon mass as well as distributions of key ensemble properties (such as oxidation state and volatility) that can be used to inform model frameworks. Results to be discussed will include the “completeness” of the instrument suite (carbon balance), the formation and evolution of particulate matter, and the changes to key chemical properties of the organic carbon upon multigenerational oxidation.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Opportunities and hurdles in the evaluation of MOFs for gas storage/capture

Prof. Philip Llewellyn

Aix-Marseille University & CNRS, MADIREL Laboratory
Centre Scientifique de St. Jérôme, 13013 Marseille, France

Date: 24 May 2018 (Thursday)
Time: 2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Venue: G4-701, 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Adsorption can be used for gas capture and storage and there is an ever-growing library of potential adsorbent materials. Within this library of adsorbent materials, the family of Metal-Organic Frameworks is receiving much attention.

In studying MOFs, the wide spectrum of physical and chemical properties should be a playground of opportunity to find an optimal material for a given application. A ‘sweet spot’ is needed in terms of adsorbent material properties and several screening methodologies are being developed to find optimal performances.

However, as for any new material there are several hurdles to overcome and pitfalls to avoid. Effects that can be related to real use such as the effect of contaminants such as water or the effect of shaping can already be evaluated at the laboratory scale.

This presentation will highlight current research in this field, with for example, the evaluation via screening in the presence of contaminants, the effect of shaping on gas uptake and the use of performance indicators to help identify materials of interest. Finally, in comparison with other adsorbents, MOFs can present novel opportunities for separation and storage and these will be discussed.

About the Speaker

Prof. Philip LLEWELLYN carried out his PhD on the characterisation of nanoporous zeolite materials using gas adsorption in 1992. This was financed by an EU collaborative program between Brunel University (UK) and the CNRS in Marseille (France). In 1993, he was carried out a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Mainz University (Germany), dealing with the occlusion of polymers inside mesoporous silica’s. He joined the CNRS in 1993 as a Research Assistant and in 1999 received a ‘Habilitation to Direct Research’. He was promoted to 2nd class Research Director in 2009 and was recently promoted to 1st class Research Director.

He is the author of over 200 peer reviewed papers and 4 patents (Hindex = 67, Google Scholar). He received the AFCAT-Setaram, Young Researchers award in 2000 for his work in thermal analysis and calorimetry. In 2005, he received the Scientific Diffusion Prize at the 5th Festival of Science and Technology for his contribution brining Science to the Classroom and General Public.

Prof. Philip LLEWELLYN’s research interests lie in the thermodynamic analysis of adsorption at the gas/ solid interface.  Three aspects are considered:

  • Understanding adsorption phenomena in well ordered solids
  • Using gas adsorption for the characterization of heterogenous solids
  • The evaluation of porous materials for their eventual use in applications including the storage and separation of gases.

Various approaches are taken including the development of specific apparatus to follow phenomena under pressure with microcalorimetry, the adsorption of mixtures and a coupled adsorption-Synchtrotron XRD system. These experimental aspects are accompanied by the macroscopic thermodynamic modeling of adsorption for the prediction of mixture behavior.

Much of his current projects lie in the evaluation of nanoporous materials with respect to several topics such as greenhouse gas recovery, hydrogen storage and hydrocarbon separations. Several classes of materials are under investigation in his group including activated carbons, zeolites, mesoporous silicas and metal organic frameworks.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Charge Carrier Dynamics at Surfaces and Interfaces of Solar-Cell Photoactive Materials: From Fundamental Understanding to Device Optimization

Professor Omar Mohammed

KAUST Solar Center, Division of Physical Science and Engineering
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)

Date: 23 May 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Venue: G5-133, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

To develop any real-world energy device, light-triggered carrier dynamics near the surface and the interface of the absorber layers need to be visualized in space and time, which can be achieved with scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (the only technique capable of surface-selective visualization of light-triggered carrier dynamics at nanometer scale) along with femtosecond laser spectroscopy. In this talk, I will show how the surface morphology, surface termination, surface compositions, surface hydration and surface orientation control the overall carrier dynamics and charge carrier collection at the device interface for many photoactive semiconductors including perovskite materials.

About the Speaker

Dr. Mohammed is the principal investigator of ultrafast laser spectroscopy and four-dimensional electron imaging laboratory and he is affiliated with Solar and Photovoltaics Engineering Research Center at KAUST, and at present, his research activities are focused on the development of highly efficient solar cells with the aid of cutting-edge nanotechnology, laser spectroscopy, and ultrafast electron imaging. Prior to joining KAUST in December 2012, Dr. Mohammed was a senior research associate in Professor Ahmed Zewail’s group at Caltech, USA. While there, Dr. Mohammed joined the research group of Professor Zewail and worked on the development of new laser spectroscopic and time-resolved electron imaging techniques. Prior to his arrival in Pasadena, California, Dr. Mohammed spent more than a decade in Germany, Switzerland and Japan, embarking on the development of new laser spectroscopic techniques for direct observation of many chemical, physical and biological processes in real time. The accomplishments of Dr. Mohammed have resulted in more than 130 articles, 100 invited talks and conference proceedings; and a large number of these papers are published in very high impact scientific journals including Science, Nature Materials, Science Advances, Nature Communications, Nano Letters, PNAS,JACS, ACS Energy Letters, Advanced Materials, Advanced Energy Materials, Angewandte Chemie, Chemical Communications, Advanced Functional Materials, Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters and Small.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

Colloquium: How did Facebook grow? Did Twitter, LinkedIn, WeChat and others grow in the same way? ― A Network-Based Universal Growth Law

Prof. C. K. Michael Tse, FIEEE, FIEAust

Chair Professor of Electronic Engineering
Department of Electronic and Information Engineering
Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Date: 16 May 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 5:30 p.m.
Venue: B5-310, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The growth of the user population of a newly launched product or service is often considered as being controlled by multiple factors like deployment of appropriate business strategy, quality of the product, market readiness, and luck! Recent research in network science has provided convenient access to the construction of models that can describe collective human behaviour. Here, we discuss a model, based on construction of a networked community and two fundamental behaviour of decision making, that can universally describe the growth of the user population of any newly launched product or service. This model leads to a universal growth equation that describes dynamically the size of the user population in terms of the prospective market size and the extents of peer influence and personal choice. We analyse 22 sets of real-world historical growth data of a variety of products and services, and show that they all follow the universal growth equation. The numerical procedure for finding the model parameters allows the market size, and the relative effectiveness of customer service and promotional efforts to be estimated from the available historical growth data. This model can be extended to a variety of practical growth applications. This talk will highlight the role of data, combined with the use of appropriate theory, in many areas of applied research.

About the Speaker

Chi K. Michael Tse graduated with BEng(Hons) and PhD degrees from Melbourne University in 1987 and 1991. He is presently Chair Professor of Electronic Engineering at Hong Kong Polytechnic University, where he served as Head of Electronic Engineering from 2005 to 2012 and on the University Council from 2013-2015. Prof. Tse's research interest covers power electronics, nonlinear systems, communications and complex network applications. He was recipient of a number of research prizes including a few Best Paper Prizes from IEEE and other journals, as well as two Gold Medals in the International Inventions Exhibition in Geneva and a Silver Medal in International Invention Innovation Competition in Canada. In 2005, 2010 and 2018, he was selected as IEEE Distinguished Lecturer. He serves and has served as Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems II, IEEE Circuits and Systems Magazine and NOLTA; as Editor of International Journal of Circuit Theory and Applications, and as associate editor of a few other IEEE journals. He has served on a number of IEEE committees including the IEEE Fellows Committee and the IEEE Awards Committee. He has been appointed to honorary professorship and distinguished fellowship by a few Australian, Canadian and Chinese universities, including the Chang Jiang Scholar Chair with Huazhong University of Science and Technology and Distinguished Professor-at-Large with the University of Western Australia. He is currently serving on panels of Hong Kong Research Grants Council, Innovation Technology Fund and as steering member of Hong Kong Quality Education Fund. He is a Board Member of the Hong Kong Sinfonietta, a publicly funded flagship orchestra in Hong Kong. Back in his own university, he chairs the culture and art committee which organises events in visual art, theatre and music with public participation. He is an IEEE Fellow and an IEAust Fellow.

Registration

The Colloquium is open to all. SEE students are required to register via AIMS in just a few steps: Go to AIMS, select “Student Services”, then select ““Central Repository on Student Development Activities System” and search the activity name “SEE Colloquium: How did Facebook grow? Did Twitter, LinkedIn, WeChat and others grow in the same way?  ― A Network-Based Universal Growth Law” or the activity code “E2-2018-1199”.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Resource Recovery in Seawater Desalination using the Membrane

Dr. Sanghyun JEONG

Research Professor, Graduate School of Water Resources
SungKyunKwan University (SKKU)

Date: 7 May 2018 (Monday)
Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Venue: B5-310, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The ultimate goal of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) brine management is to achieve minimal liquid discharge while recovering valuable resources. The suitability of an integrated system of membrane distillation (MD) with sorption for the recovery of rubidium (Rb⁺) and simultaneous SWRO brine volume reduction has been firstly evaluated. Polymer encapsulated potassium copper hexacyanoferrate (KCuFC(PAN)) sorbent exhibited a good selectivity for Rb⁺ sorption. The integrated MD-KCuFC(PAN) system with periodic membrane cleaning, enabled 65% water recovery. A stable MD permeate flux was achieved with good quality permeate. KCuFC(PAN) showed a high regeneration and reuse capacity. Ammonium chloride air stripping followed by resorcinol formaldehyde resin filtration enabled to recover Rb⁺ from the desorbed solution.

MD with crystallization (MDC) is another attractive process for high saline SWRO brine treatment. MDC also produces additional fresh water while simultaneously recovering valuable resources. It has been developed a novel approach of fractional-submerged MDC (F-SMDC), in which MD and crystallizer are integrated in a feed tank with a submerged membrane. F-SMDC principle is based on the presence of temperature/concentration gradient (TG/CG) in the feed reactor. The operational conditions at the top portion of the feed reactor (higher temperature and lower feed concentration) was well suited for MD operation, while the bottom portion of the reactor (lower temperature and higher concentration) was favorable for crystal growth.

About the Speaker

Dr. Sanghyun Jeong (PhD in Environmental Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Australia) is a research professor at Graduate School of Water Resources (GSWR), Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU). He has recently been appointed as a Korean President’s Postdoctoral Fellow. He has been involved in a number of projects on desalination, brine treatment, wastewater treatment, as well as water reuse as a principal researcher and a chief investigator over the last 12 years and published more than 70 peer-reviewed research papers in top journals. His main research interests include brine characterization and treatment using the membrane distillation process, reduction and analysis of organic and biological fouling, membrane-based filtration processes and environmental biotechnology for desalination and water reuse.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

Colloquium: Catalytic and Non-catalytic Technologies for Odor Control

Professor King Leung YEUNG

Associate Dean of Engineering (Research & Graduate Studies)
Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Professor of Division of Environment and Sustainability
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Date: 18 April 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 5:30 p.m.
Venue: G4702, 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Odor is a complex problem due to the large range of compounds involved, their low concentrations and transient nature as well as individual sensitivity to different odorous compounds. It is an important class of air pollution that can have an enormous impact on individual health and well-being. It also has an adverse impact on commerce and property values, and project a negative image of poor sanitation. Hydrogen sulfide and ammonia gases are two major causes of malodor complaints in Hong Kong and are produced by microbial decompositions of organic wastes. They are often found in waste treatment and handling facilities, landfills and indoor at lavatories and wet markets. Sewer is also a major source of malodor in urban environment and is particularly difficult to be treated. This work describe a catalytic technology to convert hydrogen sulfide and ammonia gases in air into harmless and odorless products at room temperature. A noncatalytic technology based on controlled-release of biocide, inhibitor and catalyst was also developed to address the malodor problem at the source by killing odor causing microbes, inhibiting odor generation and converting malodors through catalytic transformation.

About the Speaker

Prof. King Lun YEUNG is Professor of the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and the Division of Environment and Sustainability at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST). He has authored more than 200 publications since obtaining his Ph.D degree in Chemical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, U.S.A. His research interest is in the area of nanostructured and nanoporous functional materials and their applications in health and environment.

Prof. Yeung is the Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Studies in the School of Engineering. He is also the Director of the Technology Leadership and Entrepreneurship Program, the HKUST-CIL Joint Laboratory of Innovative Environmental Health Technologies, and the HKUST ENVF-INA/LMA Joint Laboratory on Environment. He is the co-Director of the France-HKUST Innovation Hub and Associate Director of the Environmental Engineering Program and the Environmental Facility. He is editor of Chemical Engineering Journal since 2007.

 

Researching Sustainable Cities

Dr Marie THYNELL

School of Global Studies,
University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Date: 17 April 2018 (Tuesday)
Time: 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Venue: B5-123, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Dr Marie Thynell is a Lecturer in Human Ecology and Associate Professor in Peace in Development Research at the School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. She is a Social Scientist in the area of urbanisation, development studies and the environment, researching challenges associated with sustainable cities, urban transport, air quality, social equity and gender perspectives. She has extensive experience of inter- and transdisciplinary approaches, mixed-methods and research collaborations. Dr Thynell is a board member of the Gothenburg Atmospheric Science Centre at the University of Gothenburg.  Since 2005, she is an expert member to the Asian Environmental Sustainable Transport Initiative promoted by UNCRD/UNDESA and has co-authored the Bali Declaration, 2013, ‘the next generation transport systems’ (zero congestion, zero pollution and zero accidents). Dr Thynell has also worked with a number of Swedish research foundations and international organisations; Clean Air Asia, GIZ, SIDA, FORMAS, the Swedish Research Board (VR), VREF and WRI Embarq. Dr Thynell is an expert reviewer of the 5th report from the UNIPCC, 2014, and co-author of ‘Access and Mobility in Cities’ targeting research findings in traffic and transport from the perspective of low-carbon transitions. Currently, she is working in two research projects, a) the science policy nexus of air quality management in Hong Kong and Beijing, and, b) the responses to uncertainties provoked by growing air pollution and social inequalities in Nairobi. Dr Thynell is also responsible for two courses: A) Sustainable Cities and B) Global Cities.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

SEE Tech Talk Series on Advanced Energy Technologies


Date: 7 April 2018 (Saturday)
Time: 09:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Venue: John Chan Lecture Theatre (LT-11), 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong
Energy Institute (Hong Kong)
Hong Kong Association of Energy Engineers (HKAEE)

Brief description

SEE has been undertaking cutting-edge research to address urgent energy- and environment-related issues in three categories: (1) sustainable technologies for energy, environment and health, (2) urban atmospheric and aquatic environment and (3) smart and healthy cities. In this SEE Tech Talk Series, three SEE faculty members will present their ongoing research on advanced energy technologies and potential applications for enhancing energy storage and renewable energy utilization.

Abstract & Speakers

Topic 1 – Novel Fast Charging Sb Anode for Lithium-ion Battery Applications
Dr. Denis Y.W. YU, Assistant Professor, SEE, CityU

Abstract

The lithium-ion battery is one of the most important technologies for energy storage in the market nowadays. With the increasing demand for electric vehicles, batteries with higher capacity and faster charging capability are sought. One of the bottlenecks of existing lithium-ion batteries for fast charging application is the use of graphite as the anode material. Even though graphite can give a capacity of about 350 mAh g-1 at a low current rate of 0.1 C, its available charge capacity is much reduced at a higher current rate because its working potential is about 0.1 V vs. Li/Li+. In addition, lithium plating can easily occur on the surface of the electrode with a high charging current, jeopardizing the safety of the battery.

We have developed a novel Sb anode for lithium-ion battery applications that can be charged at a rate of 20C (within 3 mins) with a reversible capacity of 380 mAh g-1. Volume expansion of the material and electrode during lithiation are controlled by polymer coating and polymer interactions within the electrode. Excellent capacity, rate capability and cycle stability are demonstrated with Sb/LiFePO4 full cells. More details will be shown at the presentation.

About the Speaker

Dr. Denis Yu is an assistant professor at the School of Energy and Environment at City University of Hong Kong. He received his Ph. D. in Applied Physics from the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University in 2003. He then worked as an engineer at SANYO Electric Co. Ltd. in Japan for 8 years, developing cathode and anode materials for Li-ion batteries. Afterwards, he led the battery activities at the Energy Research Institute at Nanyang Technological University and TUM CREATE Centre for Electromobility in Singapore as a senior scientist for two years before joining City University of Hong Kong. His research interests include fabrication, development and characterization of materials and electrodes for energy storage applications.

Topic 2 – Emerging Renewable Energy Technologies
Dr. Walid Daoud, Associate Professor, SEE, CityU

Abstract

Development of renewable energies is crucial for meeting future energy needs. Solar, mechanical and kinetics energies can provide sufficient electricity needed in daily life. In this pursuit, solar and kinetic energy harvesting approaches have been developed for energy conversion. While solar self-cleaning technology mainly converts the UV and visible regions of the solar spectrum, kinetic energy of human body movements can be harvested to generate electricity. Being intermittent energy sources, it is equally important to find storage solutions for renewable energy. This seminar intends to present the underlying concepts of the transduction mechanisms and recent research accomplishments. Future prospects and suggestions of the potential application of these technologies in HK will also be discussed.

About the Speaker

Dr. Walid Daoud is an Associate Professor in the School of Energy and Environment, CityU. He graduated from the University of Technology Graz, Austria, with a Dipl-Ing degree (BS and MS) in Chemical Engineering and received his PhD in bilayer photovoltaic cells from the University of Sheffield, UK. In 2002, he joined the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, where he played a substantial role in the establishment of a Nanotechnology Center in 2003 and took up a lectureship in 2005. In 2007, he moved to Monash University to take up a lecturer post and was promoted to senior lecturer in 2010. Dr Daoud has received international renown and several awards for his pioneering work on solar self-cleaning technology. His research has featured in Nature (2004) and Science (2008) and the international press, such as Reuters (2014), BBC (2015) and SCMP (2017). His current research is mainly focused on the areas of renewable energy conversion and storage and smart textiles.

Topic 3 – Enhanced Performance and Stability for Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells for Commercial Applications
Dr. Sam H.Y. HSU, Assistant Professor, SEE, CityU

Abstract

Hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskites have been extensively studied due to their remarkable optical and electronic features such as high absorption coefficient, long exciton diffusion length, excellent carrier transport and low exciton binding energy, as well as a facile solution process for the fabrication of organic-inorganic halide perovskites. High-efficiency solar cells with methylammonium lead halide perovskites have been successfully achieved within just a few years. The high quality perovskite films make a significant impact on the fabrication of efficient and stable hybrid perovskite solar cells. Morphology control has been recognized as an effective way to obtain highly crystalline and pinhole-free perovskite films with optimized grain sizes. Thus, I will discuss several methodologies of morphology engineering, such as additive modifications, thermal processes and compositional design. The highly crystallized perovskite layers prepared by using these techniques can show a uniform surface morphology, resulting in enhanced photovoltaic efficiency and long-term stability of hybrid perovskite solar cells.

About the Speaker

Sam H. Y. Hsu's research interests involve the material design, synthesis, processing, imaging, spectroscopy and solar energy application, aiming to explore fundamental properties and interactions of hybrid perovskite semiconductors and functional metallopolymer materials for developing efficient solar energy conversion processes. He has keen interests in photoinduced charge transfer processes, interfacial electron transfer, electrochemical hydrogen generation, and photoredox reactions for photovoltaics and solar fuel production. The investigations between material phenomena rely heavily on concepts and techniques of material and physical engineering, consisting of photophysics, electrochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, scanning photoelectro-chemical microscopy imaging, ultrafast transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence spectra.

Colloquium: Mapping the Journey to a Carbon-Free Future

Mr. Eric CHONG

President and CEO
Siemens Hong Kong and Macau

Date: 14 March 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 5:30 p.m.
Venue: B5-310, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The threat of climate change has become a widely accepted reality that our generation and future generations are faced with.  Effectively mitigating the far-reaching effects of climate change require the full commitment of nations, companies, communities and even the individual.  Climate change action necessitates a low carbon transition for the energy and environment sectors in particular. As a technology giant focused on developing innovative solutions for energy and infrastructure, Siemens is in a unique position to lead this transition.

Siemens demonstrated this leadership role in 2015 when it announced that it will be carbon neutral by 2030 – proving that an international conglomerate can play its part by setting an ambitious goal. Since then it has strived to deliver on these goals with promising results shown. In the meantime, Siemens has helped customers reduce their carbon footprint by providing energy efficient technologies and innovations that can deliver best-in-class performance yet are more friendly to the environment. A core part of these efforts are targeted at the urban environments such as Hong Kong where Siemens believes that digitalization will be the next frontier in the transition to a low carbon way of life. Advances in data analytics and IoT holds much promises in the drive to ‘do more with less’ to enhance efficiency of a city to make it more livable, more productive and all the more sustainable.

This presentation will highlight some of the technologies and innovations that Siemens offers to cities which enable them to make smarter, cleaner and sustainable decisions for their community.

About the Speaker

Mr. Eric Chong currently serves as President & CEO of Siemens Ltd. since 2011. Mr. Chong is leading the overall strategy in the areas of electrification, automation and digitalization and delivering on infrastructure projects and sustainable solutions in the field of energy, healthcare, buildings, power distribution and industry for Hong Kong and Macao.

Siemens is a global technology powerhouse with almost 170 years of history.  The company is one of the world’s largest producers of energy-efficient technologies and is a pioneer in infrastructure solutions as well as automation, drive and software solutions for industry.

Mr. Chong is currently a member of the Board of Directors of Business Environment Council (BEC) and is serving as the Chair of Climate Change Business Forum Advisory Group under BEC dedicated to promote the awareness of Climate Change among businesses. He also serves as a member of the HKTDC Electronics / Electrical Appliances Industries Advisory Committee as well as the member to the Management Board of the Construction Innovation and Technology Application Centre (CITC).  As a senior executive for more than 20 years, Mr. Chong has worked at various countries in Asia, including 10 years in China.

Mr. Chong started his career in Singapore with GEC Plc of UK before joining Siemens in North East Asia region.  He received his tertiary education in Electronics Engineering and Business Administration and holds a MBA from Henley Management College, UK.

Registration

The Colloquium is open to all. SEE students are required to register via AIMS in just a few steps: Go to AIMS, select “Student Services”, then select “Central Repository on Student Development Activities System” and search the activity name “SEE Colloquium: Mapping the Journey to a Carbon-Free Future” or the activity code “E2-2018-1091”.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Zeolites: Advances and New Platform for Applications

Prof. Jihong Yu

Professor
State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry,
College of Chemistry, Jilin University

Date: 14 March 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Venue: Room Y5-205, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Zeolites are an old topic, but they are still actively involved various processes of our current interest, such as energy saving catalytic processes, environmentally benign sorbents, storage materials for waste and energy, and other emerging applications. In recent decade, zeolite chemistry has witnessed significant advance in the aspect of synthesis and mechanistic study, structure characterization, computation and catalysis [1-5]. Zeolites are also playing more and more important roles in sustainable chemistry [6]. Strikingly, Zeolites as a new platform are finding many new applications that are beyond their traditional applications. In this presentation, I will present some recent advances in zeolite chemistry, and then demonstrate some new applications of zeolites taking advantage of their unique properties and nanospace confinement effect, such as in H2 production, light emitting, liquid separation, and biomedicine [7-11].

References
[1] B. M. Weckhuysen and J. H. Yu, Chem. Soc. Rev., 44(2015) 7022.
[2] J. Y. Li, A. Corma and J. H. Yu, Chem. Soc. Rev., 44(2015)7112.
[3] G. D. Feng, P. Cheng, W. F. Yan, M. Boronat, X. Li, J. H. Su, J. Y. Wang, Y. Li, A. Corma, R. R. Xu, J. H. Yu, Science, 351(2016)1188.
[4] Y. Li and J. H. Yu, Chem. Rev., 114(2014) 7268.
[5] Y. Li, X. Li, J. C. Liu, F. Z. Duan and J. H. Yu, Nat. Commun., 6(2015) 8328.
[6] Y. Li, L. Li, J. H. Yu, Chem, 3(2017)928.
[7] N.Wang, Q. M. Sun, R. S. Bai, X. Li, G. Q. Guo and J. H. Yu, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 138(2016) 7484.
[8] Q. M. Sun, N. Wang, Q. M. Bing, R. Si, J. Y. Liu, R. S. Bai, P. Zhang, M. J. Jia and J. H. Yu, Chem, 3(2017) 477.
[9] J. C. Liu, N. Wang, Y. Yu, Y. Yan, H. Y. Zhang, J. Y. Li, J. H.Yu, Sci. Adv.,3(2017) e1603171.
[10] Q. Wen, J. C. Di, L. Jiang, J. H. Yu and R. R. Xu, Chem. Sci., 4(2013) 591.
[11] Y.Wang, J. C.Di, L.Wang, X.Li, N.Wang, B. X. Wang, Y. Tian, L. Jiang and J. H.Yu, Nat. Commun., 8(2017)575.

About the Speaker

Prof. Jihong Yu is from the State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, Jilin University, and is the director of International Center of Future Science, Jilin University. She received her PhD degree under Prof. Ruren Xu from Jilin University in 1995, and worked as a postdoctoral fellow first at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology with Prof. Ian D. Williams and then at Tohoku University in Japan with Prof. Osamu Terasaki during 1996-1998.

She has been a full Professor in the Chemistry Department, Jilin University since 1999. She was awarded the Cheung Kong Professorship in 2007 and elected as the member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2015 and the Fellow of TWAS in 2016.

Her main research interest is in the designed synthesis and application of zeolitic nanoporous materials. She has co-authored over 300 research papers in the journals of Science, Nat. Commun., Sci. Adv., J. Am. Chem. Soc., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., Chem, etc; obtained over 20 authorized Chinese Invention Patents; edited 7 books. She was the winners of the National Prize for Natural Science, and IUPAC 2017 Distinguished Women in Chemistry/Chemical Engineering Award, etc. Currently, she serves as the Associate Editor of Chemical Science, and Editorial Board Members of Materials Horizons, Materials Chemistry Frontiers, Solid State Sciences, National Science Review, etc.. She is a Council Member of International Zeolite Association and Chinese Chemical Society, and Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Towards the application of microfluidic-based power generation: fuel cells and metal-air batteries

Dr. WANG Yifei

Postdoctoral Research Associate
Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong

Date: 14 March 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Venue: B5-209, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Microfluidic is a very interesting phenomenon and powerful technique that has been widely applied in medical science, printing industry, molecular biology, and so on. As for the energy section, various microfluidic-based power sources such as fuel cell, metal-air battery and redox flow battery have emerged in recent years and received tremendous R&D interest, which is attributed to their high performance, low cost, environmental-friendliness and great flexibility. In this talk, a novel-type fuel-breathing microfluidic fuel cell (MFC) will be presented, which can utilize methanol, ethanol, formic acid or hydrogen fuel with much improved energy efficiency. Moreover, the fuel cell system is greatly simplified together with better operational robustness. Furthermore, this fuel cell is convenient and modular for stacking into larger systems but with negligible energy loss. In addition to fuel cell, a novel-type Al-air battery utilizing paper-based microfluidics will also be presented and discussed, which can achieve simplified battery system, inhibited Al corrosion together with low fabrication cost. Targeted for different application fields, three battery subtypes have been proposed, including the rechargeable battery for charging portable electronics, the flexible battery for powering single-use devices, and the printable battery for coupling with existing printing techniques.

About the Speaker

Dr. Yifei Wang received his B.Sc. degree from Department of theoretical and applied mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China in 2012, and his Ph.D. degree from Department of Mechanical Engineering, the University of Hong Kong in 2016. He is currently a postdoctoral research fellow in HKU. His research interest is mainly focused on microfluidic fuel cells and paper-based metal-air batteries, including both experimental study and numerical investigation. In addition, he is also interested in developing non-noble electro-catalysts and graphene-based catalyst supports. During the past three years, he has published 15 journal papers and obtained two patents in the field of fuel cell and metal-air battery. His future research will be focused on flexible and printable fuel cells and batteries, redox flow batteries, and rechargeable Al ion battery.

Registration: Please click here to sign up

Enquiry: Please contact Miss Winnie Lo via e-mail: puiyanlo2@cityu.edu.hk or tel: 3442 9693.

~All are Welcome~

 

Emerging Metamaterials for Cooling and Thermal Management in Smart Green Buildings Applications

Dr. Edwin C.Y. Tso

Research Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Date: 12 March 2018 (Monday)
Time: 2:30 – 3:30 pm
Venue: Room 6211, 6/F Lau Ming Wai Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Buildings consume large amounts of resources and have a major impact, affecting the environment and sustainability of modern society. The demand for cooling systems in cities has increased over recent decades, both in commercial and residential areas. As air cooling systems are so prevalent, the energy consumed by air conditioning systems has become one of the largest proportions of worldwide energy usage. There are various techniques for space conditioning. Among the various innovative options, radiative cooling is very attractive, since it requires no electricity and is environmentally friendly. By using special properties of metamaterials to selectively reflect and emit photons in different wavelength regimes, net cooling can be achieved if the emission of infrared energy to outer space (where the radiation background temperature is 2.7 K) exceeds the absorption of sunlight and other environmental thermal radiation. To our knowledge, there is no field investigation of passive radiative cooling in Hong Kong’s hot and humid climate. This work is intended to make an initial feasibility study on how effective this technique would perform under a tropical sky. Our experimental results show that a photonic passive radiative cooler has been shown to reduce the ambient temperature by almost 8 °C under direct sunlight in Hong Kong. However, its cooling performance is dramatically reduced on a cloudy day. Therefore, an asymmetric electromagnetic transmission window, which is a kind of metamaterials, is applied to radiative cooling to improve its performance under opaque skies. In addition, instead of relying on the optical properties of the multi-layer structure, this study also aims to adopt plasmonic/biomimetic/perovskite structures (i.e. all are metamaterials) to develop the passive radiative coolers. Some preliminary results about plasmonic and biomimetic polymer-based radiative coolers are discussed. Also, a simple mathematical model is developed to determine the indoor ambient air temperature reduction inside an apartment by incorporating passive radiative coolers with HVAC systems. Apart from passive radiative cooling, adsorption cooling systems which can replace traditional vapor compression refrigeration systems in certain situations, where there is solar energy or a waste heat source, are also addressed in this study. The feasibility of using a novel composite material as the adsorbent in the adsorption cooling system is explored. The results show that the specific cooling power of the adsorption cooling system is recorded at about 400 W/kg. Last, other energy efficient building initiatives, such as VO2 thermochromic smart windows, novel solar thermal power systems equipped with hybrid nanofluid-based phase change thermal diodes, and personal ventilation systems, are also being studied to achieve the goals of energy-saving properties in energy efficient and low carbon emission sustainable buildings.

About the Speaker

Dr. Tso is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) and a Junior Fellow at the HKUST Jockey Club Institute for Advanced Study (IAS). He received his Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering with 1st class honors, his MPhil degree in Environmental Engineering and PhD degree in Mechanical Engineering from HKUST in 2010, 2012 and 2015, respectively. He was a research associate at HKUST from 2015-2016. He received the HKUST PhD Research Excellence Award (2016), as well as the Fulbright-RGC Hong Kong Research Scholar Award (2014), exchanging at the University of California, Berkeley as a Fulbright Visiting Research Scholar. In addition, he received the Sir Edward Youde Memorial Fellowship for Postgraduate Study (2013), the Bronze Award for the JEC Outstanding Engineering Project (2013), the Hong Kong PhD Fellowship (2012) and the Ove Arup Research Prize Award (2012), amongst others. His work covers thermofluid, and energy conversion in a built environment, particularly, in the fields of heat transfer, adsorption technology, thermal rectification, nanofluids, smart windows and passive radiative cooling using numerical simulations as well as advanced experimental techniques.

Dr. Tso has published 19 journal and 17 conference papers. Dr. Tso teaches courses on indoor air quality in buildings and energy management in buildings. Recently, he has established a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) named Introduction to Indoor Air Quality with Prof. Christopher Y.H. Chao. He is also a Member of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the Federation of European Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Association (REHVA). Dr. Tso is also active in entrepreneurship and technology transfer, and has obtained more than 5 patents and was involved in setting up a start-up in 2012.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Impact of the London Lorry Control Scheme on Freight Emissions

Dr. Simon Hu

Honorary Research Fellow
Transport and Environmental Laboratory, Imperial College London

Date: 12 March 2018 (Monday)
Time: 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Venue: B5-120, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Freight transport operations represent a substantial percentage of emissions in cities. In London, Freight vehicles account for 24% of road transport NOx emissions, more than twice the NOx emissions from all London buses. This presentation will introduce the existing operation of London Lorry Control Scheme (LLCS), which is one of the earliest and well-known cases of large truck restrictions in the world. The scheme restricts the movement of HGVs with a maximum gross vehicle weight above 18 tones to a restricted road network, which leads to additional vehicle distance travelled, fuel consumption and emissions. A method of quantify the emissions based on vehicle telematics data will be described. We will then discuss the potential change of different scenarios for this LLCS scheme in terms of the impacts for emissions.

The presentation is based on the work funded by the Department for Transport in the UK under the Local Transport Air Quality Challenge Innovation Grant.

About the Speaker

Dr Simon Hu is an Honorary Research Fellow at Transport and Environmental Laboratory (TEL) within the Centre for Transport Studies (CTS) at Imperial College London. He obtained a Bachelor degree (Hons) in Civil Engineering from the University of Nottingham in 2005. He then came to Imperial College London to complete his Master degree in Transport and Sustainable Engineering in 2006; he obtained his PhD in Transport System Engineering in the same department in 2011, he was awarded the Marie Curie scholarship for his PhD.

Dr Hu is a member of Chartered Institute of Highways and Transport Engineering (CIHT) and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE). He has a research and consultancy portfolio in the areas of traffic modelling, vehicle emission modelling, network reliability, traffic prediction, urban freight logistics emissions, aviation emissions. In the past, he obtained research grants and undertook research projects through INNOVATE UK, Department for Transport (DfT), UK Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC), Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), European Commission, INNOVATE UK and industry.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Tropospheric Stability Controls of the Evolution and Intensity of Tropical Cyclones

Dr. Tetsuya TAKEMI

Associate Professor
Disaster Prevention Research Institute
Kyoto University

Date: 7 March 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Venue: B5-209, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The physics for the evolution and intensity of tropical cyclones (TCs) has still unknowns, which makes the forecast of TC intensification challenging both from research and operational perspectives. In addition, due to the lack of sufficient understandings of the TC intensification physics, the projection of future changes of the TC intensity under global warming requires further investigations. In this talk, I will focus on the environmental stability control of the evolution and intensity of TCs by using an axisymmetric non-hydrostatic model. Based on our recent study on the future change of Typhoon Vera (1959), a worst-class category-5 storm, we specifically focus on effects of tropospheric temperature lapse rate, tropopause-height temperature, and tropopause height on the evolution and intensity of the TC by conducting a series of numerical experiments in which those environmental conditions are systematically changed. It was found that with the increase in convective available potential energy or in temperature lapse rate the maximum intensity of the simulated TC clearly increases. The temperature lapse rate seems to have the most significant impacts on the evolution and intensity of the simulated TCs. Compared to the lapse rate, the increases in tropopause height and in tropopause-level temperature seem to play a secondary role, although under an unchanged lapse rate condition a higher tropopause and a colder tropopause-temperature would add a positive impact on the intensification of TCs.

About the Speaker

Prof. Tetsuya Takemi obtained his PhD from the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kyoto University. Following appointments at Osaka University, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, he returned to Kyoto University as an Associate Professor. His research includes basic studies on mesoscale and microscale meteorology; tropical convection, tropical cyclones and air-sea interaction; risk assessment of meteorological disasters under climate change; and large-eddy simulation studies of local-scale atmospheric turbulence and dispersion over complex topography and urban districts. He is currently Editor, Scientific Online Letters on the Atmosphere and Co-Chief Editor, Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Levelized Cost of Consumed Electricity

Professor Aude POMMERET

Professor
University of Savoie, France

Date: 6 March 2018 (Tuesday)
Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon
Venue: Y5-104, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Current calculations to evaluate the profitability of the various energy generating units ignore intermittency as well as complementary technologies, such as battery storage and smart meters. Therefore, we propose a new assessment of the cost of solar energy that takes into account smart grids. In doing this, we use data from a low energy dwelling in South Wales UK as well as data from a high-rise apartment in Hong Kong, calibrate our model in this regard, and calculate a levelized cost of electricity consumption (LCOCE). Our proposed cost measure can be of use when determining the feasibility of smart systems, and accordingly, assist policymakers when deciding on the financial support for home renewable energy systems.

About the Speaker

Prof. Aude Pommeret is Professor at the University of Savoie, France. She has been Assistant Professor at HEC Lausanne and City University of Hong Kong. She has published in top economic journals (including Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, American Journal of Agricultural Economics or Review of Economic Dynamics) and is a referee for many journals (among which the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, The Energy Journal, Resource and Energy Economics, Environmental and Resource Economics). She is an elected member of the French National Council of Universities and at the board of the French Association of Environmental and Resources Economists from its creation in 2013.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Abundant and Cheap Carbon for Driving Industrial Biotech Innovation

Professor Vijay Singh

Professor, Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Director, Integrated Bioprocessing Research Laboratory
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Date: 5 March 2018 (Monday)
Time: 09:30 – 10:30
Venue: B5-209, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Protection of climate and anticipative shift from fossil based to renewable feedstock are driving bioeconomy in the US and around the world.  The consumer appeal for green products is creating demand for biobased chemicals and polymers.  It is estimated that 20% of today’s petrochemical production will be replaced with biobased chemicals in the next decade.  Large amounts of renewable carbon in form of fermentable sugars are needed to enable production of next generation biochemicals and biofuels.  Although cellulosic feedstocks are on the horizon, starch and sugars from corn and sugarcane will continue to play an important role in shaping biobased economy around the world.

New partnerships are forming between major starch/sugar processing, biotech, chemical and petrochemical companies to build biorefineries for production of biobased building blocks and/or polymers.  Opportunities, catalyzed by innovation from public-private partnerships and state/federal incentives, exist in major US mid-western states for capital investment, construction of new biorefineries, jobs creation and new markets for biobased products.  Research and development, derisking and commercialization of bioprocessing technologies as well as availability of abundant and cheap carbon are critical to realize widespread benefits of this new economic activity.

About the Speaker

Dr. Vijay Singh is a Distinguished Professor of Bioprocessing in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering and Director of Integrated Bioprocessing Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  His research is on development of bioprocessing technologies for corn/biomass to ethanol, advanced biofuels, food and industrial products.  Dr. Singh currently directs or co-directs more than $116 million research, has authored 165 peer-reviewed journal articles, 70 other publications and holds ten patents related to corn processing and biofuels production.  He has received numerous excellence in research awards from professional societies, academic institutions and trade organizations.  Professor Singh has also received “Excellence in Teaching” and “Innovation in Research” recognition several times.  In 2015, Dr. Singh was selected as University Scholar, highest honor given to a faculty member at the University of Illinois-system wide.  He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Food and Bioprocess Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2410 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Advances in Sustainable Building Energy Technologies

Dr. Wei WU

Guest Researcher
National Institute of Standards and Technology,
Maryland, U.S.A.

Date: 7 Feb 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 10:30 – 11:30 am
Venue: Y5-303, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Aiming at mitigating the global energy and environment problems, the sustainable building technology framework consists of three aspects: high-efficiency equipment, novel working fluids, and net-zero energy buildings.

For high-efficiency equipment, the novel absorption heating concept was proposed, a series of efficient heating systems were established, and the absorption heat pump prototype was developed. To extend the operating temperature range and heating performance, a series of advanced absorption cycles were investigated. The novel ground source heat pump was proposed to eliminate the soil thermal imbalance, reduce the number of boreholes, and improve the annual efficiency. The hybrid absorption-and-compression heat pump was proposed to counteract the disadvantages and magnify the advantages.

For novel working fluids, different natural refrigerants applied in ground source heat pumps were compared. The CO2 ground source heat pumps with different cycles under subcritical and transcritical operation were modeled, studied, and optimized. To solve the shortcomings of the conventional absorption working fluids, the novel working pairs containing low-global-warming-potential refrigerants and ionic liquids were investigated.

For net-zero energy buildings, a transient building model was established and validated to compare the energy, economic, and comfort performance of various HVAC selections.  To broaden the implementation of net-zero energy buildings with better energy system designs, the house was comparatively studied in different climate zones across the US.

Future research plans for sustainable building energy technologies will be briefly introduced.

About the Speaker

Dr. Wei Wu is currently a guest researcher of the Energy and Environment Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA. He was formerly a visiting scholar at the Center for Environmental Energy Engineering at University of Maryland, USA. He obtained his PhD degree from the Department of Building Science at Tsinghua University in 2016. He received his BEng degree from the Department of Building Environment and Energy Engineering at Huazhong University of Science and Technology in 2010.

He has strong and wide interests in the innovative technologies towards building energy saving and emission reduction. His research focuses on sustainable building technologies, including high-efficiency absorption heating technologies, renewable-energy and waste-heat technologies, hybrid heat pump technologies, ground source heat pump and improvement, CO2 heat pump and optimization, low-GWP and natural working fluids, as well as net-zero energy buildings.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Integrated Assessment of Climate Mitigation Policy: Method, Application and Outlook

Dr. Jungkyu CHOII

Associate Professor
Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Korea University,
Republic of Korea

Date: 5 Feb 2018 (Monday)
Time: 2:30 – 3:30 pm
Venue: Room B5-119, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

It has been addressed that a reliable fabrication of defect-free zeolite membranes is critical to contribute to energy-saving in separation processes as alternative to cost-intensive counterparts (distillation, crystallization, etc.). Therefore, much research has been focused on the field of zeolite membranes with respect to control of pore orientation and film thickness on diverse supports. In the first part, I will present a rational approach, aiming at the synthesis of oriented 8-MR zeolites (in particular, DDR type zeolite) membranes, which are desirable for CO2 separations. The secondary, hydrothermal growth of a uniformly formed DDR seed layer allowed for the synthesis of continuous DDR membranes. The CO2 perm-selectivities of the resulting DDR membranes will be discussed.

In the second part, hierarchically structured zeolites and their uses in traditional catalytic/adsorption applications will be addressed. Such zeolites have a high potential in overcoming conventional diffusional limitations in microporous zeolites. In particular, we chose two types of hierarchically structured zeolites; layer-structured MCM-36s and self-pillared pentasils (SPPs). Their structural transformation/formation mainly via pillaring will be introduced. Then, the effects of mesopores present in these zeolites on catalytic applications (including methanol to hydrocarbons reaction) will be discussed. Finally, recent results with SPP-based adsorbents for effective hydrocarbon trapping from emission gas streams in automobiles will be shared.

About the Speaker

Currently, Jungkyu Choi is an associate professor in the department of chemical & biological engineering at Korea University, Republic of Korea. He received the BS degree from the school of chemical engineering at Seoul National University, Republic of Korea (2003) and Ph.D. degree from the department of chemical engineering and materials science at the University of Minnesota, USA (2008). After completing the post-doctoral research associate in the department of chemical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, USA (2011/7), he started his own career at Korea University from 2011/9.

He specialized in the synthesis and characterization of microporous materials (mainly, zeolites and zeolitic imidazolate frameworks) targeting for eventual uses at the industrial scale. Specifically, he is using the zeolites as molecular sieving-based catalysts/supports, molecular filtering membrane constituents, and VOC-selective adsorbents. Nowadays, he is focusing on developing a simple, but reliable methodology for effective membranes/catalysts(or supports)/adsorbents and elucidating the related mechanisms mainly through fundamental mathematical modeling. He published 37 papers in JACS, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., J. Membr. Sci., Chem. Eng. J., Micropor. Mesopor. Mater., etc. and filed 4 patents after joining Korea University.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Electric Vehicle Development and Its Energy Management

Professor Eric CHENG

Professor,
Department of Electrical Engineering
Faculty of Engineering
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Date: 2 February 2018 (Friday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 5:30 p.m.
Venue: B5-210, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Electric vehicle (EV) is one of the major challenges  in this century.   One of the key work in EV is the energy storage  that governs the cost and the travelling distance.   Wireless power transfer may replace the present conductive charger to provide highly flexible and safety power conversion.    Super-capacitor  and fuel cells are the other alternatives.   Battery and super-capacitor management system is now so important and is a key management and safety component for batteries or energy storage system.  High power density and high efficiency motor and power converters are also important task.  An EV usually consists of tens to hundreds of moving parts that are programmed with intelligent actuation and motion control. All of the above technologies are power electronics based.  With the power electronic devices replacing most of the mechanical system, the vehicle will be highly electric.  IoT, new method of communication and security are needed to support the EV control and safety.

The talk will discuss the recent and future developments in electric vehicle and the associated control and energy management needed.

About the Speaker

Prof Eric Cheng obtained his BSc and PhD degrees both from the University of Bath in 1987 and 1990 respectively.  Before he joined the Hong Kong Polytechnic University in 1997, he was with Lucas Aerospace, United Kingdom as a Principal Engineer and led a number of power electronics projects.

He is the electrical designer for the Hong Kong 1st commercial electric vehicle in Hong Kong.  He is also the designer for the 1st charging network in Hong Kong.   He received the numerous awards related to electrical engineering, energy and automotive.   He has published over 300 papers and 7 books.  He has over 100 interviews by media on his research and development. He is now the professor and director of Power Electronics Research Centre of the university.  His research interests are all aspects of power electronics, Power Quality, Renewable energy, Motor drives, Energy Saving, EMI, high speed rail, Electric Vessel, Electric Vehicle and Automotive advanced components.   He is the recipient of the international award in 2016 iCAN Gold Medal for his contribution in  active suspension and the  Hong Kong Innovation Gold award 2017 and Seoul International Invention Fair 2015 Gold prize for his contribution in super-capacitor  to electric vehicles.

Registration

The Colloquium is open to all. SEE students are required to register via AIMS in just a few steps: Go to AIMS, select "Student Services", then select "Central Repository on Student Development Activities System" and search the activity name "SEE Colloquium: Electric Vehicle Development and Its Energy Management" or the activity code "E2-2018-1036".

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Inequality and (un)sustainable development— Reconciling social and environmental policy

Dr Lucas CHANCEL

Dr Lucas CHANCEL

Co-director, World Inequality Lab, Paris School of Economics
Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations (IDDRI), Sciences Po

Date: 1 February 2018 (Thursday)
Time: 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Venue: Lecture Theatre 13 (LT-13), 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

Laboratory for Energy Economics and Environmental Management
School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The relationship between reducing inequalities and protecting the environment is an ambivalent one. As a rule, these two goals reinforce each other but they can also find themselves at odds. To avoid having to sacrifice one goal to achieve the other, we need a deeper understanding of why the reduction of inequalities lies at the heart of the sustainable development project, and what changes need to be made to current social and environmental policies. The talk (in English) will draw from the book "Insoutenables inégalités" published in French late 2017 and which will be translated into English by Harvard University Press later this year.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email)

~All are Welcome~

Integrated Assessment of Climate Mitigation Policy: Method, Application and Outlook

Dr. Hancheng DAI

Dr. Hancheng DAI

Assistant Professor
College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering
Peking University, China

Date: 31 January 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 03:00 p.m. – 04:00 p.m.
Venue: Y5-302, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Global climate change caused by anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is one of the major challenges facing mankind this century. The cause and solution of climate change and environmental problems are not only related to pollution discharge but also related to energy, industrial structure, consumption patterns and macro-micro decisions. Hence, development and application of integrated assessment models representing all these aspects is not only an academic cutting-edge issue but also meaningful for decision support.

This presentation introduces the IMED model, or Integrated Model of Energy, Environment and Economy for Sustainable Development at Peking University, which has been applied systematically and quantitatively to analyze economic, energy, environmental and climate policies at the provincial, national and global scales to provide relevant scientific support for decision making.

About the Speaker

Hancheng Dai, Assistant Professor at College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, China. Dr. Dai’s research interests are on climate change economics, energy and environmental economics and policy assessment. He has been developing the state-of-the-art integrated assessment models to find out how the society could transit into a low-carbon and sustainable future at the local, national and global scales. Using these models, he explored key questions such as the mitigation cost of achieving the Copenhagen targets, Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and 2 ° C degree targets in China, the co-benefits of climate mitigation on air pollution, human health, water saving and resource efficiency, as well as the effects of emission trading policy in China. His main publications, including 6 ESI highly cited papers (Link), are on energy economics and policy related journal.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Application of advanced quantitative analysis methods in the study of the epidemiology of avian influenza

Professor Dirk Pfeiffer

Professor Dirk Pfeiffer

Chair Professor of One Health, Department of Infectious Diseases and Public Health
City University of Hong Kong

Date: 30 January 2018 (Tuesday)
Time: 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Venue: Y5-205, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The complex challenges associated with new and emerging zoonotic diseases, such as avian influenza, require a better understanding of the eco-social systems based on interdisciplinary research, so that more effective interventions can be developed. Meaningful inferences from the data require a good understanding of the biases inherent in the data and application of suitable quantitative or qualitative analysis methods. In this presentation, examples of the application of advanced statistical methods and mathematical modelling to different types of avian influenza data will be presented. These will include spatial statistical methods for mapping the risk of avian influenza outbreaks over large geographical areas and identifying associated risk factors, social network analyses of poultry trade networks and the use of mathematical modelling for developing disease control interventions.

About the Speaker

Dirk Pfeiffer graduated in Veterinary Medicine at the Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany in 1984. He obtained a PhD in Veterinary Epidemiology from Massey University, New Zealand, in 1994, where he also worked as an academic for 9 years. Since 1999, he has been holding the Chair in Veterinary Epidemiology at the Royal Veterinary College (RVC), London, UK. From 2015 until 2017, he also was Chief Epidemiologist for the UK Government’s Animal and Plant Health Agency. In 2016, Dirk joined Hong Kong’s City University as Professor of One Health, while still continuing to have a 20% appointment at RVC. At City University, he is the Director of the newly established Centre for Applied One Health Research and Policy Advice. Dirk has an Adjunct Professorship at the China Epidemiology and Animal Health Centre, Qingdao, China. He has been involved in epidemiological research since 1985 working in many developing as well as developed countries around the world. Dirk has worked extensively at the science-policy interface through his advisory roles for the European Union, the United Nations and several national governments.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Mobilising and Managing International Collaboration for Sustainability: Lessons and Implications from the Alliance for Global Sustainability (AGS)

Professor Yasunori BABA

Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST)
The University of Tokyo

Date: 24 January 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Venue: Y5-305, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The Alliance for Global Sustainability (AGS), initiated in the mid-1990s by the University of Tokyo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich, has been one of the most pioneering programs addressing the critical importance of international academic cooperation for global sustainability. Swiss industrialist Stephan Schmidheiny, the founder of the Avina Foundation, providing 10 million US dollars as a source funding to the AGS, clearly set the basis for entrepreneurial philanthropy on the belief that the grand challenges facing humanity cannot be overcome with financial donations alone, but also with entrepreneurial and innovative solutions. Has the AGS met the expectations? Professor Baba explains how the universities facilitated cooperation strategically and organizationally and discusses the opportunities and challenges in mobilizing and managing international collaboration for sustainability with stakeholders in society.

About the Speaker

Prof. Baba received BA in Economics (1977) from the Univ. of Tokyo and MPA (1981) from International Christian University, Tokyo. After obtaining Ph.D. in Development Studies from the Univ. of Sussex (1986), he worked as Research Fellow at Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU) there (1986-88). He was Senior Researcher at National Institute of Science and Technology Policy (NISTEP) of Science and Technology Agency (1989-91), Associate Professor of Saitama University at the Graduate School of Policy Science (1991-93), Associate Professor and Professor of Research into Artifacts, Center for Engineering (RACE) at the University of Tokyo (1993-2001), Professor of Research Center for Advanced Economic Engineering (2001-2004) and RCAST since April 2004. In 2007, Prof. Baba became a joint Professor and Head of the Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies (AIS) in the Graduate School of Engineering of the University of Tokyo. In April 2013, he received the Commendation for Science and Technology by the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan for his distinguished contribution to the interdisciplinary research on innovation policy. His research interests include economics of technical change and sociology of science and technology and their applications to science and technology policy. He has published many articles in major refereed journals such as Research Policy, Strategic Management Journal, and American Sociological Review, among others.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Innovative Wind Turbine Design

Dr. CHONG Wen Tong

Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, Malaysia

Date: 22 January 2018 (Monday)
Time: 18:00 - 18:50
Venue: Y5-205, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong
Ability R&D Energy Research Centre (AERC)

Abstract

Various innovative wind turbine designs have been introduced by researchers and inventors to improve the performance of existing vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) and horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). There are many advantages of VAWTs compared with HAWTs. Research has shown that VAWTs are more suitable for turbulent wind flow and urban applications. However, the efficiency and low self-start ability of VAWTs are always the main drawbacks especially for the lift-type VAWTs. Unlike HAWTs, the rotor blades for VAWTs do not always provide positive torque during operation. Many innovative designs have been implemented to improve the performance of VAWTs, and this includes different configurations and blade profiles. Various flow augmentation systems and attempts have been designed to increase the coefficient of power, hence improving the output power of different types of VAWTs. The methods and designs used to increase upwind velocity and to reduce negative torque created on the wind turbine are discussed. Additionally, a novel cross axis wind turbine that able to capture the wind energy from both the horizontal and vertical components of the oncoming wind is presented. The cross axis wind turbine comprises three vertical blades and six horizontal blades arranged in a cross axis orientation. Initial testing using deflectors to guide the oncoming airflow upward showed that the cross axis wind turbine produced significant improvements in power output and rotational speed performance compared to a conventional straight-bladed vertical axis wind turbine. In particular, it was found that the cross axis wind turbine integrated with a 45° deflector produced a power coefficient 2.8 times higher than the vertical axis wind turbine. The rotor rotational speed was increased by 70% with well-improved starting behaviour. The cross axis wind turbine is applicable in many locations, creating significant opportunities for wind energy devices and therefore reducing dependencies on fossil fuel.

About the Speaker

Dr. Chong Wen Tong joined University of Malaya after spending 10 years in various industries (Dyson, Sony, etc.). He is a Chartered Engineer registered by the Engineering Council (UK). His research focus is Renewable Energy & Green Technology; and he has secured more than RM 6 million research grants. Dr. Chong has filed 12 intellectual property rights, and won the First Prize of the National Intellectual Property Award 2016 (Patent Category) and more than 20 invention & innovation awards (15 Gold Medals/Prizes & 4 Special Awards) in MTE, ITEX, PECIPTA (Best Award), iidex, iENA (Germany) and SIIF (Korea). He is the Editorial Board Member of a SCI-Q1 journal (top 10%), i.e. International Journal of Precision Engineering and Manufacturing‐Green Technology. Dr. Chong has co-authored >100 technical articles (h-index=21), and he won the Best Paper Award in ICAME 2009 and ISGMA 2012 (Korea). He was awarded "Energy Invention Order of Merit" in World Inventor Award Festival 2012 and "Young Researcher Award" in ISGMA 2014, Busan. He is also the recipient for the University of Malaya Excellence Award 2016, Excellent Lecturer (Science & Technology). He is the Member of the ASM (Academy of Sciences Malaysia) Task Force on Carbon Free Energy, and the Member of ACCCIM (The Associated Chinese Chambers of Commerce and Industry of Malaysia) Science, Technology and Innovations Committee. He has established strong collaboration with researchers from China and Taiwan, and is appointed as the Visiting Professor of Beijing Institute of Technology, Zhuhai and North China Institute of Aerospace Engineering, China.

Enquiry: Please contact Miss Winnie Lo via e-mail: puiyanlo2@cityu.edu.hk or tel: 3442 9693.

~All are Welcome~

 

Solving Material Research Questions by Synchrotron Based Techniques

Dr. Qinfen GU

Australian Synchrotron (ANSTO), 800 Blackburn Rd, clayton, 3168,
VIC, Australia

Date: 15 January 2018 (Monday)
Time: 2:15-3:15pm
Venue: Room B6605, 6/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

X-ray is an excellent probe for studying the electronic and crystallographic structure, microstructure, dynamic and kinetic processes of materials. In an application, what makes one material better than another? Scientists and engineers can employ X-ray methods to understand how such materials and even devices work. Using specific designed in-situ setups, materials or components can be subjected to conditions designed to mimic their true operating conditions.  For these types of work, making use of large scale facilities such as Australian Synchrotron (ANSTO) is essential.

Synchrotron radiation with high flux and high resolution gives us information that would not be possible from laboratory X-ray instruments. X-rays are electromagnetic radiation emitted from electrons that are circulated in a central storage ring before being directed to an experimental station; a beamline. The main advantages of synchrotron radiation are high parallelism, high intensity, and tuneable energy. Synchrotron X-rays are available as an extremely intense beam that allow fast scattering or diffraction studies. At synchrotron sources various techniques at different beamlines offer structural and chemical information on different time and length scales. For example, in-situ X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) uses the high intensity and resolution of synchrotron radiation for fast studies of phase transitions and detailed structure solution of novel compounds, while small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) provides information on particle size and shape. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) uses the energy tunability properties of synchrotron radiation to provide inter atomic distances, bonding valence, and oxidation states of the samples. Here we describe a collection of applications with synchrotron based techniques which have been used in variety of materials and energy research. Combining synchrotron radiation with various sample environment setups we are able to demonstrate the power of the method.

 

About the Speaker

Dr Qinfen Gu is a senior beamline scientist at Australian Synchrotron (ANSTO), and an adjunct senior researcher fellow in Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne. He was awarded a PhD from Department of Materials at ETH Zurich, Switzerland. In addition to beamline development and instrument design, Dr Gu focuses his research in the areas of energy storage materials, metal-organic frameworks and zeolites, novel material under extreme conditions (high pressure& high temperature). He has co-authored more than 120 referred journal publications and has received several Australian research council (ARC) grants.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Phase and Phase States of Secondary Organic Aerosol

Professor Mijung SONG

Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences
Chonbuk National University

Date: 10 January 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Venue: B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Information of the phases and the phase states of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) is required when predicting their cloud condensation nuclei properties, optical properties, and size distributions. To determine their phases and phase states of SOA particles, we have studied the liquid-liquid phase separation and the viscosities of different types of SOA particles as a function of relative humidity (RH). First, using a flow cell coupled to an optical microscope, we have investigated liquid-liquid phase separation in different types of SOA particles free of inorganic salts. Liquid-liquid phase separation was observed at high RH of ~95% in α-pinene-derived SOA, β-caryophyllene-derived SOA, limonene-derived SOA particles while liquid-liquid phase separation was not observed in isoprene-derived SOA and toluene-derived SOA particles. Second, using a bead-mobility technique and a poke-flow technique combined with fluid simulations, the RH-dependent viscosities of SOA were quantified. Results and implications of these studies will be presented.

About the Speaker

Prof. Mijung SONG received her Ph.D. from ETH in atmospheric sciences and climate in 2013. She was a Postdoctoral Fellow in the University of British Columbia after graduation, and now is an assistant professor at the Chonbuk National University, Korea. Her research focuses on understanding the physical and chemical properties of aerosol particles and the role of hygroscopic properties, phase transitions, and morphologies of aerosol particles.

Enquiry: pomlee@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

Colloquium: Efficient Degradation of Environmental Pollutants and Air Disinfection by VUV Assisted Photocatalysis

Professor Dennis Y.C. LEUNG

Associate Head
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Faculty of Engineering
The University of Hong Kong

Date: 10 January 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 10:30 a.m.
Venue: G4302, 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) is one of the fastest developed technologies for the control of environmental pollutants (in both gaseous and aqueous state) as well as for energy production (such as hydrogen generation and dye-sensitized solar cell). The PCO process is normally triggered by the irradiation of UV light. The most widely used UV sources in PCO are 254 nm and 365 nm UV lamp. However, conventional PCO process has disadvantages such as recombination of electron-hole pair in photocatalyst leading to low process efficiency and photocatalyst deactivation. In order to improve the efficiency and stability of the PCO process, UV lamps with partial 185 nm UV irradiation (denoted as VUV lamp) can be used to activate photocatalysts. 185 nm VUV lamps cannot only irradiate photocatalyst but also generate active oxidants such as O and OH radicles, and ozone all of which enhance the oxidation of the organic components in the nearby pollutants. These can also kill microbes in the air and water, and therefore have disinfection effect. In this talk, the results of VUV enhanced photocatalytic degradation of common VOCs (such as toluene and benzene) and water pollutants (such as methyl blue and acrylic wastewater) together with its disinfection effect will be presented and discussed. In addition, ozone is a byproduct generated in the process that can enhance the oxidation and disinfection effects but can also cause harmful effects on our health. The removal of the residue ozone using modified catalyst will also be discussed.

About the Speaker

Prof. Dennis Y.C. Leung received his BEng (1982) and PhD (1988) from the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Hong Kong. He had worked with the Hongkong Electric Co., Ltd. for five years heading the air pollution section of the company before joining the University of Hong Kong in 1993. Professor Leung is now a full professor of the Department of Mechanical Engineering specializing in environmental pollution control and renewable & clean energy development. He has published more than 400 articles in this area including 240+ peer reviewed top SCI journal papers. He was invited to publish more than 20 review articles in leading energy and environment related journals. His current h-index is 56 and total citations are more than 13000. He is one of the top 1% highly cited scientists in the world in energy field since 2010 (Essential Science Indicators) and named as a Highly Cited Researcher by Clarivate Analytics in 2017. Prof. Leung has delivered more than 50 keynote and invited speeches in many conferences as well as public lectures. Prof. Leung is a chartered engineer, a fellow of the IMechE and Energy Institute. He is also the Past Chairman of the Institute of Energy (HK Branch), and served as an editorial board member of a number of journals including and Applied Energy and Journal of Power & Energy. He is the Specialty Chief Editor of the Frontiers in Environmental Science since 2014. He currently serves as a board member of the Hong Kong Institution of Science, chairman and member of a few government committees and appeal panel related to sustainable energy and environment, and an external examiner of the IVE Engineering Programme. Professor Leung received numerous awards including the Outstanding Earth Champion Hong Kong award in recognizing his contributions in protecting the environment.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Effect of Anthropogenic Emissions on Aerosol Composition and Properties in the Southeastern United States

Dr. Theodora Nah

Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
Georgia Institute of Technology

Date: 4 January 2018 (Thursday)
Time: 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Venue: B5-309, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The climate and health effects of particulate matter (termed aerosols) depend heavily on their composition and properties. While previous studies have shown that interactions between biogenic emissions and air pollutants emitted from human activities can affect atmospheric chemistry and aerosol formation, the detailed mechanisms of these interactions remain largely ambiguous, thus preventing the implementation of effective regulation policies to reduce aerosol pollution. The Southeastern US is a natural outdoor laboratory for studying the effects of biogenic-anthropogenic interactions on atmospheric aerosol formation and processing, due to the proximity of biogenic emissions with a variety of anthropogenic pollution sources. In this talk, I will talk about the roles that gas-phase ammonia and nitrogen oxides (two common air pollutants) play in affecting the composition and properties of aerosols in the Southeastern US.

About the Speaker

Dr. Theodora Nah received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 2014 where she used experimental and kinetic modeling techniques to understand how photochemistry and fundamental molecular interactions influence the heterogeneous oxidation of submicron organic aerosols. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Georgia Tech where she is studying the influence of anthropogenic pollutants on the formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosols through a combination of field and laboratory chamber studies.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

TOWARD REAL TIME MONITORING OF INDOOR BIOAEROSOL TRAFFIC

Mark Hernandez

PhD, PE Professor of Environmental Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, USA
Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering

Date: 19 December 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 10:30am – 11:30am
Venue: G5-317, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

An improved ability to characterize airborne microbes in our built environment has a multitude of important engineering and public health benefits for urban society. This notably includes better bioaerosol monitoring in health care settings, water-damaged buildings, transportation centers as well as other high-density public venues.  In this context, I present emerging aerosol technology we have deployed in portable arrays that report what currently marketed aerosol monitoring equipment cannot provide in near-real time: the identity, distribution and abundance of airborne microorganisms.    Compared to conventional aerosol sampling, a new generation of filterless devices is emerging that provides photobiological characterization with complimentary condensation capture through platforms that can size, count, collect and preserve aerobiological agents with exceptional fidelity.  These filterless approaches provide an unprecedented path to compile large exposure databases, which may better enable the scientific, medical and industrial hygiene communities to better understand—and help control—indoor microbial air pollution.

About the Speaker

Professor Hernandez attained all his degrees from the College of Engineering at University of California at Berkeley.  He is a registered professional engineer, and an expert on the characterization and control of bioaerosols, including 20 years of research extending applied genetics and biochemistry to the atmospheric environment – both indoors and out.  The focus of much of his work leverages bioaerosol science for wide area surveillance, and design metrics for aerosol disinfection on large indoor scales.

Professor Hernandez’s research group is based at the University of Colorado’s state-of-the-art environmental microbiology laboratory, which houses on of the largest bioaerosol chamber in the US (90 m3), with full environmental controls.  Since it’s commissioning, this laboratory has been active in BL2 aerobiology research supported by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health (CDC/NIOSH), the US EPA and various private and public companies including the Boeing Company, Ultraviolet Devices Inc., Honeywell Inc., Sceptor Industries, Carrier Corporation and National Jewish Hospital of Denver.

Professor Hernandez maintains an active environmental microbiology research program which focuses on the remediation of polluted indoor air, and was an associate editor of Aerosol Science and Technology. He won the Water Environment Foundation’s Canham Award to support technology transfer between the US and England, and was a recipient of a National Science Foundation early CAREER award, and was chosen as distinguished lecturer for the US scientific research society, Sigma Xi.  Professor Hernandez maintains a modest consulting practice, serves as an expert witness in the remediation field, and holds US patents that form the basis of a technology start-up company, focusing on heavy metal reclamation from wastewater; he has over 100 archival publications.  He has recently served on four US National Academy of Science Committees, focusing on the risk assessment of secure containment for the next generation of bioterrorism research, the microbiology of the built environment.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR CO2 CAPTURE: AN OVERVIEW

Prof. Paul A. WEBLEY

The Peter Cook Centre for Carbon Capture and Storage,
The Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering,
The University of Melbourne, Australia

Date: 12 December 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 2:30-3:30pm
Venue: G5-314, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Adsorption processes for CO2 capture have gained significant attention in the last decade with hundreds of reports on new adsorbents and processes for capture and removal of carbon dioxide from a range of gas streams.  To date, the only commercial examples are removal of trace carbon dioxide in gas streams such as LNG and ASU upstream molecular sieve units. There are no commercial examples of the use of adsorbents to capture carbon dioxide by adsorption processes and deliver a stream of high purity carbon dioxide for sequestration or further processing.  In this study, we present the range of processing options available for CO2 capture using adsorbents and show how these processes must be adapted to the condition of the feed stream. We also show how these processes make requirements of the adsorbents (or adsorbent systems) and highlight what features new adsorbent should have to help advance adsorption technology.  Specific examples of near commercial adsorption processes will be discussed, e.g. vacuum swing adsorption, high temperature dry regenerable fluidized bed systems, and rapid temperature swing systems.

About the Speaker

Paul Webley is Head of Department of Chemical Engineering and Director of the Clean Energy Laboratory at The University of Melbourne.  He is former manager of the Carbon Capture Program for the CO2CRC and Director of the Peter Cook Centre for Carbon Capture and Storage at The University of Melbourne. Paul has worked in development and implementation of carbon capture technologies for the past 15 years in industry and academia. His principal research interest is clean energy technologies particularly gas separation, energy storage, and applications of thermodynamics to improve process efficiency.  He is the author of more than 200 papers in scientific journals and books, 15 patents, and more than 100 contributions to international and national conferences.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 or 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

SOA formation and East Asian Carbonaceous Aerosols measurements

Dr Wenzheng Fang

Researcher
Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University

Date: 30 November 2017 (Thursday)
Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 nn
Venue: B5-122, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

For SOA, the formation mechanisms have not fully understood and SOA contains a large number of difficult-to-measure compounds from diverse chemical classes. Combined online tunable photo-ionization aerosol mass spectrometry and theoretical calculations, the molecular-level of SOA formation from photo-oxidation (or ozonolysis) of important VOCs (e.g. Isoprene, Monoterpenes, Toluene) had been investigated. Online analysis of SOA products served as direct evidence for SOA formation from VOCs oxidation, and provided insights into SOA formation pathways.

For East Asian aerosols, the poorly constrained emissions sources and uncertain mechanisms for atmospheric transformations, hindered accurate modelling of effects and development of science-based mitigation. We use dual carbon isotope signatures (Δ14C and δ13C) to constrain sources and processing effects for all the major pools of carbonaceous aerosols: black carbon (BC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC) in E. Asia. For a winter haze study, our results show large fossil contributions (>50%) to all carbonaceous aerosol pools in E. Asia, with dramatically different coal contributions to BC in north China and receptor site Korean Climate Observatory at Gosan (>50%) compared to Shanghai (22%). Our large-scale measurements also indicate strong light absorbing property of WSOC and establish a source seasonality of BC over E. Asia. These findings facilitate an improved estimate of aerosol-induced climate, and a scientific underpinning for developing a regionally-tailored mitigation strategy in East Asia.

About the Speaker

Dr. Wenzheng Fang has worked on aerosol and atmospheric chemistry for about 10 years. In 2012, he earned his PhD at University of Science and Technology of China, where he successfully developed an online tunable photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer to study SOA formation from photo-oxidation of VOCs. After PhD, Dr. Fang moved to study biogenic VOCs emissions and sinks with Prof. Alex Guenther and Prof. Jim Smith in NCAR, using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer and chemical ionization mass spectrometer. Later, he served as an associate researcher at Institute of Urban Environment/Chinese Academy of Sciences. Since May 2015, he joined the Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Bolin Center for Climate Research at Stockholm University as a researcher/EU Marie Curie individual fellow and guest researcher, where he focused on source diagnostic and optical properties of black carbon, organic carbon and water soluble as well as water-insoluble organic carbon aerosol in East Asia.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Colloquium: Airborne Particulate Matter Pollution in Urban China: A Chemical Mixture Perspective from Sources to Impacts

Professor Xiangdong LI

Chair Professor of Environmental Science and Technology
Associate Dean (Research)
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering
Faculty of Construction and Environment
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Date: 29 November 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 5:30 p.m.
Venue: B5-309, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Rapid urban and industrial development has resulted in severe air pollution problems in developing countries such as China, especially in highly industrialized and populous urban clusters. Dissecting the complex mixtures of airborne particulate matter (PM) has been a key scientific focus in the last two decades, leading to significant advances in understanding physicochemical compositions for comprehensive source apportionment. However, identifying causative components with an attributable link to population-based health outcomes remains a huge challenge. The microbiome, an integral dimension of the PM mixture, is an unexplored frontier in terms of identities and functions in atmospheric processes and human health. In this review, we identify the major gaps in addressing these issues, and recommend a holistic framework for evaluating the sources, processes, and impacts of atmospheric PM pollution. Such an approach and the knowledge generated will facilitate the formulation of regulatory measures to control PM pollution in China and elsewhere.

About the Speaker

Professor Xiang-dong Li is Chair Professor of Environmental Science and Technology at Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Associate Dean (Research) of Faculty of Construction and Environment, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. He obtained his BSc in Earth Sciences and his MSc in Geochemistry from Nanjing University, and his PhD in Environmental Technology from Imperial College London.

Professor Li’s major research interests include regional environmental pollution, urban environmental studies, and phytoremediation of contaminated soils. He has published more than 180 papers in leading international journals, and is one of the highly cited researchers in Environment/Ecology of the Web of Science database (Researcher ID B-2011-2008).

Professor Li is the past president (2011-2013) of the International Society of Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH). He is currently an Associate Editor for Environmental Science and Technology (ES&T). Professor Li is also an associate editor and editorial board member for several other international journals in related research fields.

Registration

.The Colloquium is open to all. SEE students are required to register via AIMS in just a few steps: Go to AIMS, select “Student Services”, then select “Central Repository on Student Development Activities System” and search the activity name “SEE Colloquium: Airborne Particulate Matter Pollution in Urban China” or the activity code “E2-2017-0883”.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Weather and Climate Risks

Dr. Habil. Christian Franzke

Head of Weather and Climate Risks Theme,
Meteorological Institute,
Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability (CEN),
University of Hamburg

Date: 28 November 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 2:15 – 3:15 pm
Venue: B5-211, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Weather and climate extremes cause huge economic damages and harm many lives each year. There is evidence that some types of weather and climate extremes, like heat waves and flooding, have already increased or intensified over the last few decades, and climate projections reveal a further intensification for many types of weather and climate extremes in many regions though the uncertainties still remain large. While there is evidence for increases in economic losses it is uncertain whether this is due to an increase in the number and intensity of extreme events or can be attributed to socio-economic changes. In my presentation I will provide some ideas how to better understand and model such extreme events and their impacts in a changing climate.

About the Speaker

Christian Franzke studied Meteorology at the University of Karlsruhe (Vordiplom (BSc): 1992-1995) and the University of Hamburg (Diplom (MSc): 1995-1998). At the University of Hamburg he also completed his PhD (1999-2001) in the Theoretical Meteorology group. After that he held PostDoc positions at the Pennsylvania State University (2001-2002), the Courant Institute of Mathematical Science at New York University (2003-2006) and the National Center for Atmospheric Science (NCAR: 2006-2007). He then was a Senior Scientific Officer at BAS in Cambridge, UK from 2006-2013. Since 2013 he is back in the Theoretical Meteorology group at the University of Hamburg where he is the head of the Weather and Climate Risks theme and PI of the TRR181 project "Energy transfers in Atmosphere and Ocean". He has wide ranging research interests in climate dynamics, climate change, extreme events, weather and climate risks, renewable energy and socio-economic modeling. He is the author of the book Nonlinear and Stochastic Climate Dynamics.

 

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 or 3442 2412(Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Moist-convective rotating shallow water: a low-cost tool for understanding the influence of diabatic effects upon dynamics

Prof. Vladimir ZEITLIN

Professor
Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique
Université Pierre et Marie Curie/Ecole Normale Superieure

Date: 28 November 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon
Venue: G4701, 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

I will show how to introduce convective fluxes in a self-consistent way in rotating shallow models which follow from vertical averaging of the primitive equations in pressure coordinates. I  will demonstrate that the model reproduces, at low cost, the characteristic features of moist baroclinic instability, moist instabilities of hurricane-like vortices and salient features of their life-cycle, and also the observed structure of Mars' polar vortex, taking into account the gas-solid phase  transition of CO2.

About the Speaker

Professor Vladimir ZEITLIN obtained his PhD in theoretical and mathematical physics in 1980 from the Physical Institute (Moscow). Subsequently he moved his focus to geophysical fluid dynamics in the early 1980s. He worked at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (Moscow) on vortex dynamics, wave-vortex interactions and turbulence.  After moving to France, he joined the Laboratory of Dynamical Meteorology and is currently Professor at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie and École Normale Supérieure (Paris) and Vice-President of the Meteorology, Oceanography and Environmental Physics section of the French National University Council.  He has written two books, including the textbook, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics: Understanding (almost) everything with rotating shallow water models, which is forthcoming from Oxford University Press.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414(Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

The Aerosol-Monsoon Climate System of Asia: Changes and Vulnerability

Dr. William K. M. LAU

Earth Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC)
Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences,
University of Maryland

Date: 27 November 2017 (Monday)
Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Venue: Peter Ho Lecture Theatre (LT-10), 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Worsening air pollution and increasing frequency of severe floods and droughts in Asia, are two of the most important present and future threats affecting the fresh water supply and public health of more than 60% of the world population.   As a result of active research in the last decade, there is now an increasing body of evidence indicating that monsoon rainfall and aerosols – the tiny particles suspended in the atmosphere during air pollution, are strongly interacting, playing key roles in the evolution of the present and future climates of Asia.  In this talk, I will review recent advances on our understanding of the variability of the coupled aerosol-monsoon climate system, and interactions among aerosol emissions, transport and atmospheric dynamics in South Asia and East Asia.  Possible interaction pathways may include local effects through aerosol impacts on atmospheric radiation, and microphysics of clouds, as well as non-local effects arising from aerosol emission, transport, and feedback processes involving changes in rainfall, moisture, winds, thermal contrast, and heat sources and sink re-distributions in the atmosphere-ocean-land monsoon system.  These interactions take place over a wide range of temporal scales from hourly to multi-decadal, and spatial scales from 1-105 km.

GHG warming alone can have both enhancing and limiting effects on monsoon precipitation through differential heating of the land and ocean, and changes in large-scale circulations.  Aerosols can modulate rainfall by masking GHG warming, and suppress or enhance rainfall locally by altering atmospheric stability.  Light absorbing aerosols (dust, black carbon and organic carbon) from both anthropogenic and natural sources may interact with monsoon dynamics, and exacerbate global warming via dynamical feedback processes.   Examples of clear and present vulnerabilities include accelerated melting of high mountain glacier and snowpack, bursting of glacier lakes in the Himalayan foothills, disastrous flooding and mudslides in the Sichuan Basin and other mountainous Asian monsoon regions with dense populations.   Policy implications for air pollution, and greenhouse gas emission controls for Asia will be discussed.

About the Speaker

William K. M. Lau received his B. Sc. (Mathematics and Physics) in 1972, and B. Sc. Special (Applied Mathematics), in 1973 from University of Hong Kong, both with 1st Class Honors. He received his MS in Physics, and PhD in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. He is currently, Deputy Director for Atmospheres, Earth Science Division, NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, which is a world class research center of over 250 PhD scientists, including government and university scientists. He is an Adjunct Professor of Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences U. of Maryland, and Adjunct Professor of Mathematics at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and is a senior science advisor of the Hong Kong Observatory. He frequently visits international research and academic institutions in countries and regions including China, India, Southeast Asia, Taiwan, Hong Kong, North and South America, and Europe to present invited lectures, and keynote speeches to promote interests and awareness in regional impacts of climate change. His research work spans more than three decades covering a wide range of topics in climate dynamics, tropical and monsoon meteorology, ocean-atmosphere interaction, aerosol-water cycle interaction, climate variability and climate change.

Dr. Lau received many awards for his research and scientific leadership, including among others, the American Meteorological Society Meisinger Award for young scientist (1988), the NASA John Lindsay Award (1987), the Goddard Exceptional Achievement Medal (1991), the William Nordberg Award in Earth Science (1999). He is a Goddard Senior Fellow, a fellow of the American Meteorological Society, and a fellow of the American Geophysical Union. He has served on numerous international science steering group and expert panels, including among others, the WMO Monsoon Climate Expert Panel, the GEWEX Science Steering Group, the ACPC (Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation-Climate) Science Working Group, and Committee on Himalayan Glacier and Impacts on Downstream Population, National Research Council, US National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Lau published 250 refereed papers, articles in encyclopedia, and book chapters. He was on the ISI Web of Science’s list of highly cited researchers among all fields since 2002, with total citation =17149, h-index =74 (Google Scholar, 2014). He is the principal author of a popular research reference book “ Intraseasonal Variability of the Tropical Ocean-Atmosphere Climate System ”, Praxis Springler Publisher, 1st edition 2006, 2nd edition 2012. In 2010, Dr. Lau was awarded the Distinguished Alumni Award of the Faculty of Science, HKU, for his outstanding contribution and leadership in Asian monsoon and climate change research. In 2011, he received the Honorary Professorship award from the School of Energy and Environment, City U. of Hong Kong. He was elected President-Elect (2013-2014), and President (2015-2016) of the Atmospheric Sciences Division, American Geophysical Union.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

Air quality - interactions with and impacts on society and the Earth system

Prof. Dominick Spracklen

Professor of Biosphere-Atmosphere Interactions
School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds

&

Dr. Steve Arnold

Associate Professor of Atmospheric Composition
School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds

Date: 24 November 2017 (Friday)
Time: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Venue: B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

It is widely recognised that poor air quality impacts human health, is harmful to vegetation and plays a key role in climate change. In this seminar we will summarise recent and ongoing research efforts at the University of Leeds to understand linkages between air quality, human health and the Earth System. Our approach is to combine complex regional and global models with observations from the surface, aircraft and satellites to probe fundamental processes controlling these interactions. We will present examples ranging from impacts of residential energy use on air quality to feedbacks between natural aerosol and climate.

About the Speaker

Dominick Spracklen is a Professor in Biosphere-Atmosphere Interactions at the University of Leeds. His research group explores interactions between the biosphere, atmosphere and climate. He is interested in understanding the processes driving atmospheric composition with a focus on natural aerosol including secondary organic aerosol and biomass burning.

Steve Arnold is an Associate Professor of Atmospheric Composition at the University of Leeds. His research focuses on the intimate coupling between atmospheric chemistry and the Earth system. He works with numerical models and observations to advance understanding of processes controlling transport and processing of trace gases and aerosols in the atmosphere, and their interactions with climate and society.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Indirect photochemical oxidation in aqueous aerosol particles

Prof. Dr. Markus Ammann

Head of Surface Chemistry Group
Paul Scherrer Institute,
Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry, Switzerland

Date: 23 November 2017 (Thursday)
Time: 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Venue: G5-132, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Aerosol aging refers to the multitude of physical and chemical transformation atmospheric particles undergo, which play an important role in the impact of aerosols on climate, air quality and health. Most aerosol types contain primary and secondary organic compounds that are chromophores, which on one hand are contributing to the optical properties of aerosols but which may on the other hand initiate indirect photochemical oxidation processes. Many of these are aromatic carbonyls forming excited triplet states, which are important oxidants in electron transfer or H abstraction reactions. An important characteristic of the triplet chemistry is that they on one hand lead to further formation of secondary organic matter and on the other hand form reduced ketyl radicals, which may transfer the excess electron to oxygen and thereby produce HO2 radicals and then reform the ground state chromophore again, which closes a photocatalytic cycle. Another type of chromophore is represented by iron carboxylate complexes, in which the initial oxidation is initiated by ligand to metal charge transfer, and the closure of the photocatalytic cycle is mediated by Fenton’s chemistry via the reaction of Fe(II) with H2O2. In this overview, some examples are discussed, where the role of different chromophores for the oxidation of oxygenated organic compounds and halide ions is demonstrated, by using a multitude of diagnostic tools with various observables, such as HO2 release to the gas phase, formation of OVOC species, mass loss and offline analysis of low-volatility products. Special emphasis is also given to the feedbacks between microphysical parameters (viscosity) and the oxidative chemistry by following the above mentioned observables over very long time scales and by using an X-ray microspectroscopy method to follow chemically induced spatial gradients within individual aerosol particles in a quasi-online manner.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Sustainable Biotechnologies Treating Organic Waste and Wastewater: More Than Treatment

Dr. Hyung Sool LEE

Associate Professor,
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering,
Department of Chemical Engineering,
University of Waterloo

Date: 22 November 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Venue: Room 2104, 2/F, Li Dak Sum Yip Yio Chin Academic Building (AC2), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Sustainable management of organic waste and used water (called wastewater) is of interest as energy, water and climate change become an important issue to be addressed in present or the near future. For this reason, there is strong driving force to develop innovative technologies meeting the requirements of energy, water, and climate change in environmental engineering area. From my talk, I will share several of ongoing projects that are able to capture value-added products (energy, chemicals, and more) from organic waste and wastewater as they are cleaned, mainly with two fundamentals: extracellular electron transfer (EET) and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). EET, that plays a vital role in the cycles of carbon and metals in nature, can be engineered for microbial electrochemical cells capable of recovering value-added products from organic waste and wastewater. Despite of EET significance, its understanding is very limited especially for EET kinetics. I will discuss EET mechanisms and kinetics, and its implication in electronically conductive biofilm anodes recently discovered from my lab. Regarding AOM, I will share some of new discoveries on AOM microorganisms and a recently developed biotechnology engineering AOM for denitrification and reduction of other oxidized contaminants (e.g., selenate) in water.

About the Speaker

Dr. Hyung-Sool Lee, currently Associate Professor at Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering and Department of Chemical Engineering in the University of Waterloo, is an expert for extracellular electron transfer (EET), fermentation, methanogenesis, anaerobic oxidation of methane and related anaerobic biotechnologies. His research interest includes discovery of new microbial metabolisms, syntrophy interactions, characterization of thermodynamics and kinetics of those microbial biochemical reactions, and identification of related microorganisms and genes. Then, he likes to engineer new discoveries by integrating them with advanced materials and process engineering to help our society, like building a green circle of our life. In recent years, he has focused on EET and anaerobic oxidation of methane, and has developed several innovative biotechnologies based on the two microbial reactions, which can catalyze the growth of sustainable treatment processes of organic waste and wastewater.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 or 3442 4022(Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

Resource recovery in an integrated urban water management framework

Professor Long Nghiem

Representative of the Engineering Cluster
Deputy Director of the GeoQuest Research Centre
University of Wollongong

Date: 15 November 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Venue: B5-309, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

New membrane processes including forward osmosis (FO) and membrane distillation (MD) provide an excellent platform to transform wastewater treatment facilities to biorefineries. Major advantages of FO and MD include operation at very low hydraulic pressures, high rejection of a broad range of contaminants, and lower propensity for membrane fouling than in pressure-driven membrane processes. Our research demonstrates that FO and MD can be used to directly extract clean water from raw sewage for reuse, while simultaneously concentrating wastewater to the level suitable for anaerobic treatment. Anaerobic treatment of wastewater, sludge, and organic waste can produce biogas, which can then be used by a combined heat and power engine to produce electricity and thermal energy. Membrane based techniques have been developed to recovery phosphorus as either struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) or hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) from the sludge centrate. Pathway for practical implementation of the research outcomes toward a ‘livable city model’ will also be briefly discussed.

About the Speaker

Professor Long Nghiem attended the University of New South Wales for his Bachelor Degree in Environmental Engineering, Yale University and the University of Wollongong for his PhD in Membrane Technology. In 2009, he was a visiting professor at Colorado School of Mines. In May and June 2016, he was an August-Wilhelm Scheer Visiting Professor at the Technical University of Munich. He is currently the leader of the Strategic Water Infrastructure Laboratory and Deputy Director of the GeoQuest Research Strength at the University of Wollongong. Over the last 5 years, as the lead Chief Investigator, he has secured over $2.4 Million in competitive research grants and over $0.7 Million in industry research funding. Prof Nghiem has supervised to completion 17 PhD and 7 Master students. To date, he has published over 230 journal articles. Prof Nghiem has an h-index of 44 with over 6,500 citations (according to Scopus). His current work focuses on the development of a technology platform for the recovery of energy and resources from wastewater and low carbon seawater desalination.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Clean Energy Systems with High Renewable Energy Penetration

Prof. YAN Jinyue
Professor
Royal Institute of Technology & Mälardalen University, Sweden
Editor-in-Chief of Applied Energy

Date: 31 October 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 15:00 – 15:50
Venue: B5-211, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong
Ability R&D Energy Research Centre (AERC)

Abstract

Energy, or precisely, “Clean energy”, is at the centre of highly active and dynamic field, which changes and affects not only our current life, but also our near future. Due to the importance Clean Energy currently possesses and its transitive characteristics: research, development, implementation, innovation, market penetration of clean energy technologies and system have expanded in recent course of time. Energy systems have been in transition, extending their boundaries beyond the energy systems themselves. One of the challenging issues is the intermittent power generation and mismatching of energy supply and demand over a time scale when high renewable energy penetration takes place.

This calls for a new way to solve the challenging issues associated with the new transitions of future clean energy systems with interdisciplinary and synthetic approach from not only the systematic overview, but also detailed components of clean energy systems. It needs to integrate the end-users load control with different energy saving approaches. It is location specific and highly tailored to serve its customers’ needs. This seminar is to address the transition of clean energy systems and to illustrate, by an example, how an optimization solution can be achieved under the condition of high renewable energy penetration.

About the Speaker

Professor Jinyue Yan is chair professor of Energy Engineering at Mälardalen University & Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden. He is the director of Future Energy Profile. Prof Yan’s research interest s include advanced energy systems; renewable energy; advanced power generation; climate change mitigation technologies and related environment and policy; CDM etc. Prof. Yan published about 300 papers including in Science & Nature Climate. Prof. Yan is editor-in-chief of Handbook of Clean Energy Systems. He is the Chair of International Conferences on Applied Energy. He is an academician of European Academy of Sciences and Arts, and serves as the advisory experts to the UN, EU & ADB etc.

Registration

Please click here to sign up

Enquiry: Please contact Miss Winnie Lo via E-mail: puiyanlo2@cityu.edu.hk or Tel.: 3442 9693.

~All are Welcome~

 

High performance graphene oxide electromechanical actuators: piezoelectric and shape memory effects

Assoc. Professor Zhe Liu

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Australia
Faculty of Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Date: 30 October 2017 (Monday)
Time: 2:30 – 3:30 pm
Venue: B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The electromechanical properties of graphene and graphene-oxide (GO) have proven to be both unique and exciting. The feasibility of employing these materials as commercial micro/nano- electromechanical actuators is highlighted by their exceptional strain output (up to 28%), volumetric work capacities (as much as 29 times greater than common high modulus ferroelectrics), and fast response rate (up to GHz). This talk will provide an overview of our density functional theory (DFT) simulation studies of the piezoelectric and shape memory effects of GO in the past few years.

(1) Our DFT simulations predicted that some GO compounds had excellent piezoelectric strain output: 0.16% under an electrical field of 0.5V/A, which is comparable with some high performance of piezoelectric ceramics. We found that the rippling structure of GO plays a decisive role in its piezoelectric performance. With an atomically thin structure, GO can be a promising two-dimensional piezoelectric membrane in various MEMS/NEMS applications.

(2) Shape memory effect was observed for GO being subject to a vertical electrical field. We find that some of the GO crystal structures intrinsically have two stable phases/states. Applying an electric field perpendicular to the basal plane of the stable GO phase leads to a huge plastic in-plane contraction deformation of 15% as a result of a phase transformation from the stable to the metastable phase, whereas a mechanical force in parallel to the basal plane can revert the meta-stable GO to its original shape (the stable phase/state), completing a whole shape memory cycle.

The superior electromechanical properties of GO-based materials render them a unique position to address future demand on micro/nano- actuation materials. Our theoretical studies are essential to obtain in-depth physical knowledge of the electromechanical actuation behavior and, therefrom, how to best optimize its performance in the future.

About the Speaker

Zhe Liu is associate Professor of Computational Materials Engineering in Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Melbourne. He graduated from Engineering Mechanics Department at Tsinghua University, China, and got his PhD degree from Materials Science and Engineering Department at Northwestern University in US. After that, he spent two years as postdoc research fellow in National Renewable Energy Laboratory in US.

Liu group’s research aim is to use computation to aid the knowledge-based design for novel materials. Meeting the increasing energy demand of ever growing population requires novel materials and devices for energy efficiency, energy conversion, and energy storage applications, meanwhile mitigating or minimizing the undesirable impact on our environment. Beyond the traditional trial-and-error experimental method, computational design is a promising way to greatly accelerate the novel material discovery and device system design. In past ten years, Liu’s group develops and employs state-of-the-art computational methods for the designs of structural materials (metallic alloys) and energy related functional materials, such as semiconductor and oxide alloys, 2D energy conversion materials, and nanoporous materials for energy storage. His group has published 89 papers including ~20 on top journals like Science and Nature series, PRL, JACS, Adv. Mat., etc.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Digital Rock Physics, Natural Energy Resources and Induced Earthquakes

Professor Teng-fong Wong

Founding Director
Earth System Science Programme
Faculty of Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Date: 25 October 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 5:30 p.m.
Venue: G5-314, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

In the physics of rock, there are two fundamental questions associated with the exploitation of hydrocarbon resources: What controls the percolation and flow of fluids in the porous rock formation? How does deformation evolve and localize to form structures that may enhance or inhibit the fluid flow? Extensive field observation and systematic laboratory investigation have documented the complexity of flow in porous media, and its interplay with strain localization. Percolation theory and bifurcation analysis have provided useful frameworks for the analysis of these phenomena. With advances in 3D imaging of the geometric complexity, digital rock physics can now be pursued to model these processes via voxel-based simulations.

Fluid flow and associated changes in pore pressure may induce earthquakes. In the past decade, a number of such induced earthquakes have been reported in association with the storage of fluid in the vicinity of active faults. A fundamental understanding of this phenomenon requires interdisciplinary efforts in seismology, geodesy and rock physics. We have an ongoing collaboration with China Earthquake Administration near one of China’s largest repositories of natural gas in Hutubi, Xinjiang, to monitor the earthquake activity and probe its connection with the extraction and withdrawal of gas. A synopsis of the project and preliminary results will be presented.

About the Speaker

Professor Teng-fong Wong is founding director of the Earth System Science Programme in the Faculty of Science, CUHK. After matriculation in Hong Kong, he went to the United States where he obtained undergraduate and graduate degrees from Brown, Harvard and MIT. Before returning to Hong Kong to assume his current position, Wong has taught for thirty years at Stony Brook University, where he served as Chair of the Department of Geosciences and associate dean of the Graduate School. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union, and recipient of the Louis Néel Medal of the European Geosciences Union in 2010.

Registration

The Colloquium is open to all. SEE students are required to register via AIMS in just a few steps: Go to AIMS, select “Student Services”, then select “Central Repository on Student Development Activities System” and search the activity name “SEE Colloquium: Digital Rock Physics, Natural Energy Resources and Induced Earth” or the activity code “E2-2017-0862”.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Harvesting, Storing and Utilising Solar Energy using Photoactive Semiconductors

Dr. Yun Hau NG

School of Chemical Engineering,
The University of New South Wales, Australia

Date: 23 October 2017 (Monday)
Time: 2:15 – 3:15 pm
Venue: B5307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Hydrogen generation from photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical water splitting under visible light has been considered as an effective way to make solar energy storable and transportable. As oxygen is the only by-product from splitting water, this reaction has great potential to simultaneously address the energy shortage and environmental issues by replacing fossil fuel. A great number of photoactive semiconductors (be it oxide, sulphide or etc) has attracted extensive attention due to its low-cost, mostly non-toxic, usually high stability, and with considerable theoretical photocurrent density for H2 generation. These characteristics meet favourably the requirements for water splitting. In contrast, the challenges in extending their capability in this application lie on several aspects, such as the extension of the solar spectrum absorption, the charges transportation, and the photo-stability of the materials. For example, TiO2 absorbs only UV wavelength, ZnO suffers from photocorrosion and many others experience significant charges recombination processes. Introduction of nanosctructures or secondary components into the parental semiconductor is a potential way in tackling the above mentioned issues. The main driving force for our research in the UNSW is to improve (if not overcome) the above shortfalls by using several different chemical synthetic approaches and device designs.

About the Speaker

Yun Hau Ng received his Ph.D. from Osaka University (Research Center for Solar Energy Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering Science) in 2009. After a brief research visit to Radiation Laboratory at University of Notre Dame (Prof. Prashant Kamat’s group), he joined the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials UNSW with the Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship (APD) in 2011. He is currently a senior lecturer with tenure in the School of Chemical Engineering at UNSW. His research is focused on the development of novel photoactive semiconducting particles for sunlight energy conversion and storage, including hydrogen generation from water, conversion of carbon dioxide to solar fuels, and solar battery. He received the Honda-Fujishima Prize in 2013 in recognition of his work in the area of photo-driven water splitting. He was also selected as Emerging Investigator by the RSC Journal of Material Chemistry in 2016. He has published over 95 peer-reviewed research articles and is currently serving as Editorial Board Member for NPG Scientific Reports.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

CAS-ESM and Applications to Simulate Extreme Weather Events

Professor Minghua ZHANG

(1) Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences
(2) School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, State University of New York at Stony Brook, USA

Date: 28 September 2017 (Thursday)
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Venue: B5-209, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

This presentation will start with an introduction of the Chinese Academy of Sciences Earth System Model (CAS-ESM). The model has the capability of two-way nesting with the mesoscale weather forecast model (WRF). It can be therefore used for high-resolution regional simulations of extreme weather and climate events while retaining upscale feedback with long lead time. Results will be presented on the simulation and analysis of a cyclogenesis event in the US Central Plain and a heavy precipitation event in the Beijing by using the model. Ongoing efforts to improve the model and its regional applications will be described.

About the Speaker

Minghua Zhang is Professor and "Thousand Plan" Scholar at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. He is on leave from the State University of New York at Stony Brook, where he had served as Director of the Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres, and Dean of the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences.

Minghua Zhang's research is about numerical modeling of climate and global climate change. He develops and improves atmospheric general circulation models on moist convection and clouds, and applies these models to understand past and future climate changes. He has published over one hundred articles in peer-reviewed journals. For his climate modeling research, he had served for ten years as co-Chair of the Atmospheric Model Working Group of the Community Earth System Model that is administered at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). He is currently the Lead Scientist overseeing and coordinating the development of the Chinese Academy of Sciences Earth System Model—CAS-ESM.

Minghua Zhang is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR)–Atmospheres of the American Geophysical Union (AGU).

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Colloquium: The Poles and Environmental Protection

Dr. Rebecca LEE Lok-sze, MH

Founder and Director
Polar Museum Foundation

Date: 20 September 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
* Light Refreshments will be served after the Colloquium
Venue: G5-314, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The Poles were the world's cleanest and flawless Iceland. However, due to environmental pollution and global warming, these paradises are changing rapidly. The collapsing and melting of ice shelves, pollution on icebergs, and massive changes in environmental and ecological systems are happening here. Global warming has caused the frequent occurrence of extreme climate variations, drought, floods, hurricanes, heat waves, tornadoes and other natural disasters. It also results in the rising of sea level, spreading of disease, extinction of species and other consequences. These phenomena represent consequences of our continual destruction of the environment. The Antarctic, Arctic and Tibetan Plateau are unique elements that are irreplaceable in the whole Earth system. The two poles are two cold sources of the Earth, and they directly control the change of global climate and environment through the atmospheric circulation. Therefore, environmental protection is imperative.

To cultivate environmental protection, the popularization of science and the artistic packaging of it are very important. The public should fully understand the purpose and significance of polar research, and recognize the critical contributions of scientists. Eventually, a bridge for communication with young people will be established.

We are all residents of the global village. For protecting the living environment, we must work together to popularize science education for the next generation.

About the Speaker

Dr. Rebecca Lee has transformed herself from a professional graphic designer, painter, photographer and writer to a polar researcher in the last 30 years. 

Pursuit of innovation has resulted in her being recognized as the first Hong Kong woman explorer to reach the Arctic, Antarctic and Mount Everest Region She was the author of more than fourteen books, organized numerous educational exhibitions and produced TV documentaries about the world we live in.

Her personal integrity is seen in her courage, resilience, and survival in extreme conditions and adversity. She has been to the Arctic ten times, Antarctica eight times and to Mount Everest region four times. Her work shows a true love for our planet and mankind.

Rebecca has delivered hundreds of lectures to primary and secondary school students, university undergraduates in Hong Kong, Macau and China about her work, adventure and latest scientific findings on the environment. They are inspired to take a more serious attitude towards life and to conserve and protect the environment.

The community has benefited tremendously from her public education efforts. She is contributing significantly to the goal of environmental protection.

Registration

The Colloquium is open for all.  All SEE students are required to register via AIMS in just a few steps.  Go to AIMS, select “Student Services”, then select “Central Repository on Student Development Activities System” and search the activity code: E2-2017-0818.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Colloquium: Food and Environment in the US and China in The Donald Trump and Xi Jinping Era

Prof. Robert GOTTLIEB

Professor of Urban & Environmental Policy, Emeritus Founder and former Director of the Urban & Environmental Policy Institute
Occidental College, Los Angeles

Mr. Simon NG

Independent Consultant in Environmental and Transport
Fellow and former Chief Research Officer at Civic Exchange

Date: 12 September 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Venue: B5-311, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The US and China are the two largest carbon emitters, the two largest users and manufacturers of pesticides, and the two largest energy consumers and producers, and have the two largest food systems in the world. With the election of Donald Trump in the US and consolidation of power of China President Xi Jinping, some see a role reversal in such areas as food and environmental policy. Is this true? The talk by Robert Gottlieb and Simon Ng will discuss what changes have taken place at the local, national, and global level, and what needs to happen to make their food and environmental systems greener, healthier and more just.

About the Speaker

Prof. Robert GOTTLIEB is Emeritus Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy, and founder and former Director of the Urban & Environmental Policy Institute at Occidental College, Los Angeles.

Mr. Simon NG is an environmental and transport consultant, and Fellow and former Chief Research Officer at Civic Exchange, a public policy think tank in Hong Kong.

Robert and Simon co-authored Global Cities: Urban Environments in Los Angeles, Hong Kong, and China, published by the MIT Press in May 2017.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

A wave-induced negative feedback between the stratified coastal ocean and tropical cyclones

Professor Ralf TOUMI

Head of Space and Atmospheric Physics, Department of Physics
Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ, UK

Date: 5 September 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Venue: B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Predicting tropical cyclone structure and evolution remains challenging. Particularly, the coastal surface wave interactions with tropical cyclones have received no attention. Through a series of state-of-the art high-resolution, fully-coupled ocean-wave and atmosphere-ocean-wave experiments, we show here for the first time that wave-induced mixing is the major driver of stratified coastal ocean ahead-of-cyclone-eye cooling, influencing the evolution of both the ocean and tropical cyclones. The presence of a continental shelf leads to a small enhancement of the wind-driven cooling ahead of the cyclone compared to deep water,. However, the wave-induced vertical mixing contribution to the cooling is significantly larger than that caused by  currents. In the fully-coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave mode, the maximum wind speed is weaker and the damaging footprint area of hurricane-force winds is reduced by up to 50% due to the strong cooling ahead. Including wave-induced dynamics is essential to improve tropical cyclone intensity predictions for the highly populated and vulnerable coasts.

About the Speaker

Prof. Ralf TOUMI was awarded his PhD from the University of Cambridge in on stratospheric ozone under the supervision of Prof. John Pyle, FRS. He was then appointed a temporary lecturer in the Chemistry Department in Cambridge and a Fellow in Physical Chemistry at Christ's College Cambridge. He moved to the Physics Department at Imperial College and joined the Space and Atmospheric Physics group as a Lecturer in 1994. He was promoted to Professor of Atmospheric Physics in 2005 and since 2014 is Head of the Space and Atmospheric Physics Group. He was awarded the Phillip Leverhulme Prize for "scholars of outstanding distinction" (2002), a Merit Award by Imperial College for outstanding achievement in research (2004), a Royal Society Industry Fellowship with BP (2006-2010) and a NERC Knowledge Exchange Fellowship (2009-2012), Co-chair of Adaptation Services in the Climate KIC (2013-2015). He advises BP Plc on how to adapt to the physical impacts of climate change. He is founding director of OASIS LMF Ltd which is promoting open access catastrophe modelling for the insurance sector and others. OASIS was also the basis of a 5 year Europe wide Climate KIC (Euro 4M)  project he led.  He has co-authored and reviewed many international reports such as WMO Ozone Assessments, SPARC and IPCC Reports. He has served on the ESA mission advisory group and the European Commission Climate Services Road Map group. He is a member of the extend science team of Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS). He has supervised 24 PhD students to completion and has published extensively covering a wide range of topics in climate science (130+ papers; 2700+ citations; H-Index=30).

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

Aerosol Science and Technology for Industrial Applications -Measurements, dynamic behaviors, and materials synthesis-

Prof. Kikuo OKUYAMA

Professor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Hiroshima University, Japan

Date: 14 August 2017 (Monday)
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Venue: B5-310, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Aerosols are defined as gaseous suspensions of fine solid or liquid particles. Commonly described as dust, fume, smoke, mist, smog, and haze, aerosols are naturally present in our environment and often seen as harmful substances, which affect our life quality. This triggered the development of aerosol measurements and particle collection techniques over the years. On the other hand, development of aerosol technology by taking its advantages could benefit the human being and our society. Aerosol technology can be applied in the industries through the integration with other fields. One of the important applications is the synthesis and functionalization of nanomaterials towards advanced devices.

In this lecture, my aerosol related research is firstly introduced by focusing on the aerosol measurement technology, such as charger, differential mobility analyzer and condensation nucleus counter. Then, applications of aerosol technology to the production of nanostructured fine particles for magnetic materials, energy conversion devices, and organic pollutant removal are also discussed.

About the Speaker

Prof. (emeritus) Kikuo Okuyama has been working in the field of aerosol science and technology for over 40 years. He received B.S. (1971) and M.S. (1973) in Chemical Engineering from Kanazawa University. He started to work at the University of Osaka Prefecture (1973) and received his Dr. Eng. in Chemical Engineering with the thesis entitled “Coagulation of Aerosols” in 1978. He visited the United States in 1979 and worked as a post-doctoral researcher in the University of Houston (1979–1980) and a visiting associate at California Institute of Technology (summer time, 1985-1991). Since 1990, he was a full-professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Hiroshima University until his retirement in 2013. After retirement, he became an emeritus professor at the same university. He has been co-authoring more than 500 scientific papers in SCI-indexed journals and producing more than 150 patents. Professor Okuyama has been engaged in a number of national projects concerning particles contamination during semiconductor processing, materials synthesis using aerosol routes, investigation of atmospheric aerosols, and magnetic nanomaterials. He has received numerous honors and awards, including the Fuchs Memorial Award in 2002.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Workshop on Exploring Sustainable Smart Cities: Opportunities and Challenges in Interdisciplinary Approaches

Date: 21 – 22 August 2017
Time: 9am – 6pm
Venue: P4703, 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Sustainable development and smart city are far more than a theoretical concept of balancing the economic, environmental, social, and technological dimensions of human development. In practice, it requires innovative solutions that ensure prosperity while protecting all people and the planet. As cities around the world are currently under fast transition towards a low carbon environment and resource efficient economy, there is a growing importance of exploring the opportunities and challenges in profiling the competitiveness and sustainability of cities. In this connection, the School of Energy and Environment is hosting a workshop on “Exploring Sustainable Smart Cities: Opportunities and Challenges in Interdisciplinary Approaches” on August 21st-22nd  at City university of Hong Kong. We hope to take this opportunity to bring together the knowledge and theories, and ultimately aim to scale up practical solutions and shape new policies for the development of sustainable smart cities.

The workshop will split into two sessions for each of the two days. In the morning session, the visiting fellow, Dominika P. Brodowicz, PhD. and Assistant Professor, Innovative City Department at Warsaw School of Economics will provide tutorial lectures on “Sustainable development of contemporary metropolises - green and smart solutions in Europe, Asia and North America”. In the afternoon session, renowned experts from academic, industrial, and governmental sectors will deliver talks by sharing their hands-on experience and exchanging ideas on sustainable development and smart city.

List of guest speakers:
Dr. Dominika Brodowicz, Assistant Professor, Innovative City Department, SGH Warsaw School of Economics  
Pr. Patrick T.I. Lam, Department of Building & Real Estate, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Dr. Kira Matus, Division of Environment and Sustainability, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Dr. Wanxin Li, Department of Public Policy, City University of Hong Kong  
Pr. Yuan Xu, Department of Geography and Resource Management, Chinese University of Hong Kong  
Dr. Kyung-Min Nam, Department of Urban Planning and Design, University of Hong Kong  
Dr. Eddy Lau, Head of Green Labelling, Hong Kong Green Building Council  
Dr. Lara Jaillon, Department of Architecture & Civil Engineering, City University of Hong Kong  
Mr. Simon Ng, Expert fellow, Civic Exchange  
Dr. Lin Zhang, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong  
Dr. Masaru Yarime, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong  
Dr. Ian Ridley, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong  
Dr. Aude Pommeret, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong  
Pr. Peter Brimblecombe, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong  
Dr. Esther Hiu Kwan YUNG, Department of Building and Real Estate, Hong Kong Polytechnic University  

The workshop is open to public and will be fully sponsored by the School of Energy and Environment. All interested parties are welcome to join parts or all sessions of the workshop.

The organizing committee:
Dr. Aude Pommeret
Dr. Ian Ridley
Dr. Masaru Yarime
Dr. Lin Zhang

High-Temperature Electrolysis Using Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cells

Prof. CHAN Siew Hwa

Professor
School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and
Co-Director, Energy Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Date: 8 August 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Venue: G4-302, 4/F., Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Lately, the term “energy storage” has been represented by batteries almost exclusively. Batteries are considered as the “sole” solution for energy storage in renewable energy applications such as wind curtailment or grid support. In this talk, energy storage in gravimetric and volumetric capacities will be shared and the domain of applications will be discussed. To explore the use of green chemical energy, such as hydrogen or ammonia, as an energy storage media, high-temperature electrolysis appears to be the right technology for converting the renewable energy sources into the green chemical energy. The focus of this talk will be placed on electrolysis of seawater and co-electrolysis of flue gas discharged from the oxy-combustion power plant by using renewable energy. The latter can be seen as a means to bridge the gap between the fossil fuel and non-fossil fuel economies.

About the Speaker

Prof. Chan joined NTU as a Lecturer in 1991 after obtaining his PhD and subsequently working as a postdoctoral researcher at Imperial College London. He is now a Professor in the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Prof. Chan is a Director of Maz Energy Pte Ltd, where he provides technical advices to the Board since 2004. He is a member of the Management Board of Energy Studies Institute (SGP); Advisor to Total SA, Horizon Fuel Cell Technologies and Wuhan Koleal (China). He was appointed by Ministry of Education (China) as an International Member of External Review Panel for the Institutional Quality Audit to South China University of Technology. Prof. Chan’s research is inclined Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Technology. His research has gained him a number of recognitions, which include George-Stephenson Award from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (UK), “World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds 2014” from Thomson-Reuters, Nanyang Award (Research Excellence), Nanyang Award (Teaching Excellence), etc. Prof. Chan has published more than 240 refereed journal papers with total citations of ~9000 and h-index of 50 (WOS). He is the editorial board member of “Fuel Cells – from fundamentals to systems”, “Journal of Power Technologies” and “Energy Conversion and Management”. He is very active in commercializing technologies developed at his laboratories.

Registration: Please sign up here.

Enquiry: Please contact Miss Winnie Lo via e-mail: puiyanlo2@cityu.edu.hk or Tel.: 3442 9693.

~All are Welcome~

 

Understanding the Anomalously High Capacity of Electrode Materials for Li-ion Batteries

Prof. Won Sub YOON

Professor
Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Korea

Date: 7 August 2017 (Monday)
Time: 3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Venue: B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Recently, various novel mesoporous metal oxides have been widely investigated as electrode materials for LIBs. These studies have opened up a possibility for the development of anode materials with significantly improved Li-storage performance. Synthesized ordered mesoporous SnO2 showed a reversible capacity of about 1000 mAhg-1, which is higher than the predicted value based on the alloying reaction mechanism of Sn, formed from conversion reaction of SnO2 with Li. Additionally, we have found that the mesoporous MoO2 anode presented here gives a high Li-storage capacity (1,814 mAhg-1 at first cycle and 1,607mAhg-1 after 50 cycles) as well, which is much higher than its theoretical capacity based on the conversion reaction of MoO2 with Li (838mAhg-1). As aforementioned, several research groups have newly proposed Li-storage mechanisms; however, this extra Li-storage mechanism of transition metal oxide is still unclear, suggesting that the high capacity of the mesoporous MoO2 in the present work probably results from a different Li-storage mechanism than those previously reported.

The results from mesoporous SnO2 and MoO2 anode materials further provide a more complete understanding of possible Li-storage mechanisms for transition metal oxides, and thus make possible the further advancement of ultrahigh capacity anode materials for Li rechargeable batteries. More detailed discussion will be presented at the time of meeting.

About the Speaker

Won-Sub Yoon is a professor in the Department of Energy Science at Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU). He received his Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from Yonsei University, Korea. He worked at Brookhaven National Laboratory in USA as a principal investigator and Kookmin University in Korea as a professor. His research group is specialized in studying electrode materials and the structural properties for energy conversion and storage systems including rechargeable batteries, fuel cells, and supercapacitors. Most of his publications (more than 120 papers) have been focused on developing and applying in situ synchrotron-based X-ray techniques to investigate electrode materials and the reaction mechanisms for rechargeable battery systems attacking current issues in rechargeable battery R&D. He has extensive experience with in situ synchrotron X-ray research. Especially, he has pioneered in the application of in situ time-resolved XRD, in situ temperature dependent XRD, in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and in situ SAXS studying on the structural and electronic changes of ion storage materials during real time operation.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Date: 21 July 2017 (Friday)
Time: 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Venue: B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Tailored Solid Acid and Base Catalysts for Bio-Derived Fuels and Chemicals

Prof. Karen Wilson

Research Director
European Bioenergy Research Institute, Aston University

Abstract

Concerns over the economics of proven fossil fuel reserves, in concert with government and public acceptance of the anthropogenic origin of rising CO2 emissions and associated climate change from such combustible carbon, is driving academic and commercial research into new sustainable routes to fuel and chemicals. Catalysis has a rich history of facilitating energy efficient, selective molecular transformations, and in a post-petroleum era will play a pivotal role in overcoming the scientific and engineering barriers to economically viable, and sustainable, biofuels and chemicals derived from renewable resources. [1] The production of advanced biofuels, derived from biomass sourced from inedible crop components, e.g. agricultural or forestry waste, or non-food crops such as Jatropha Curcas or microalgae, necessitate new solid (heterogeneous) catalysts and processes to transform these polar and often viscous feedstocks. Here we discuss catalytic solutions for clean synthesis of sustainable biodiesel [2], the most readily implemented and low cost, alternative source of transportation fuels, and key challenges in the design and application of catalytic technologies for the upgrading of pyrolysis bio-oils [3] via liquid phase transformations over solid acids and bases in batch and flow processes [4]. Advances in the rational design of nanoporous solid acid and base catalysts, possessing hierarchical architectures (Figure 1) or tailored surface functionality, can deliver superior performance in the energy-efficient esterification and transesterification of bio-oil components into biodiesel [5], and conversion of cellulosic components into key platform chemicals [6].


Fig. 1. Hierarchical nanoporous catalysts for efficient biodiesel production from bulky bio-oils.

[1] G.W. Huber, A. Corma, Angew. Chem. Int.-Ed. 2007, 46, 7184.
[2] K. Wilson, A.F. Lee, Cat. Sci. Tech. 2012, 2, 884; A.F. Lee, J.A. Bennett, J.C. Manayil, K. Wilson, Chem. Soc. Rev. 2014,43, 7887.
[3] L. Ciddor, J.A. Bennett, J.A. Hunns, K. Wilson, A.F. Lee, J. Chem. Tech. Biotech. 2015, 90, 780.
[4] V. C. Eze, A. N. Phan, C. Pirez, A. P. Harvey, A. F. Lee, K. Wilson, Catal. Sci. Technol. 2013, 3, 2373.
[5] J. Dhainaut, J.-P. Dacquin, A. F. Lee, K. Wilson, Green Chem. 2010, 12, 296; J. J. Woodford, J.-P. Dacquin, K. Wilson, A.F. Lee, Energy Environ. Sci. 2012, 5, 6145
[6] A. Osatiashtiani, A.F. Lee, M. Granollers, D.R. Brown, L. Olivi, G. Morales, J.A. Melero, K. Wilson, ACS Catal 2015, 5, 4345.

Nanoengineered Catalysts for Sustainable Chemistry

Prof. Adam Lee

EPSRC Leadership Fellow
European Bioenergy Research Institute, Aston University

Abstract

The quest for sustainable technologies to meet the food, energy and material challenges of this century is a key driver for the design of next-generation catalysts and industrial chemical processes. Control over the rate and pathway of associated chemical transformations represents the Holy Grail for catalysis, [1] however while chemoselective oxidations and hydrogenations of alcohols and carbonyls respectively are cornerstones of traditional organic synthesis, catalysts for such applications have eluded rational design. Here we highlight how advances in inorganic synthesis, underpinned by nanoscale materials visualisation and molecular level insight into dynamic surface chemistry through in-situ time-resolved spectroscopies, [2] are unlocking new high performance catalysts. This approach is illustrated for noble metal catalysed cascade oxidations (Fig. 1), [3] and the chemoselective hydrogenation of allylic aldehydes, [4] which both deliver high value chemicals for the polymer, fragrance and flavourings sectors.


Fig. 1. (a) Spatially orthogonal functionalization of hierarchical pore network by Pd and Pd nanoparticles affords precise control over reaction sequence in the one-pot catalytic cascade oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol→cinnamaldehyde→cinnamic acid. (b) Cinnamyl alcohol consumption (blue), and cinnamaldehyde (yellow) and cinnamic acid (green) production over a spatially orthogonal, hierarchical Pd macroporous-Pt mesoporous SBA-15 catalyst significantly outperforms conventional bimetallic and monometallic SBA-15 analogues.

[1] X. Zhang, K. Wilson, A.F. Lee, Chem. Rev. 2016, 116, 12328.
[2] A.F. Lee, C.V. Ellis, J.N. Naughton, M.A. Newton, C.M.A. Parlett, K. Wilson, JACS 2011, 133, 5724.
[3] C.M.A. Parlett, M.A. Isaacs, S.K. Beaumont, L.M. Bingham, N.S. Hondow, K. Wilson, A.F. Lee, Nature Mater. 2016, 15, 178.
[4] X. Zhang, L.J. Durndell, M.A. Isaacs, C.M.A. Parlett, A.F. Lee, K. Wilson, ACS Catal. 2016, 6, 7409.

About the Speaker

Prof. Karen WilsonisProf. Karen Wilson is Chair of Catalysis and Research Director of the European Bioenergy Research Institute at Aston University, where she also held a Royal Society Industry Fellowship in collaboration with Johnson Matthey. Karen has a BA from the University of Cambridge (1992), an MSc in heterogeneous catalysis from the University of Liverpool (1993) and a PhD (1996) in heterogeneous catalysis and surface science from the University of Cambridge. Karen was appointed to her first independent academic position at York in 1999 where she stayed until 2009 when she was appointed to a Readership in Physical Chemistry at Cardiff University. Karen’s research interests lie in the design the design of tuneable porous materials for sustainable biofuels and chemicals production from renewable resources. She has published >180 peer-reviewed articles (h-index 45).

Web Page: http://www.aston.ac.uk/eas/staff/a-z/professor-karen-wilson/
Email: k.wilson@aston.ac.uk

Prof. Adam LeeProf. Adam Lee is Professor of Sustainable Chemistry and an EPSRC Leadership Fellow in the European Bioenergy Research Institute, Aston University. He holds a BA and PhD from the University of Cambridge, and has held Chair appointments at Cardiff, Warwick and Monash universities. His research addresses the rational design of nanoengineered materials for clean catalytic technologies, and the development of in-situ methods providing molecular insight into surface reactions, for which he was awarded the 2012 Beilby Medal and Prize of the Royal Society of Chemistry. He has published >180 peer-reviewed articles (h-index 44).

Web Page: http://www.aston.ac.uk/eas/staff/a-z/professor-adam-lee/
Email: a.f.lee@aston.ac.uk; Twitter: @ ProfAdamFLee

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Towards Immensely Smart Sustainable Cities: From Self-driving Cars to Self-aware Buildings and Self-optimizing Grids

Dr. Sid Chi Kin CHAU

Assistant Professor
Masdar Institute in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE)

Date: 12 July 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Venue: Room Y5-204, 5/F., Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The paradigm of “smart cities” is transforming our society by merging extensive computing and information technology with urban infrastructure, services, facilities, and resource management. However, most smart city projects focus on collection and dissemination of data. The potential of smart cities has been not fully realized for improving sustainability. In this talk, a vision towards immensely smart sustainable cities with a high degree of automation and computational intelligence is outlined, which features self-driving vehicles that can automate transportation without human assistance, self-aware buildings that can intelligently acquire dynamic knowledge of buildings for automated control, and self-optimizing grids that can optimize energy management in the presence of uncertain energy demands and supplies. This talk presents my recent research work for enabling immensely smart sustainable cities.

About the Speaker

Sid Chi-Kin Chau is an assistant professor with the Masdar Institute in Abu Dhabi, UAE, which was established in collaboration with MIT. His primary research area is sustainable smart city systems and applications - by applying computing algorithms, intelligent systems and data analytics to develop sustainable solutions for smart cities, including smart grid, smart buildings, intelligent vehicles and transportation. He also researches in broad areas of cyber-physical systems and Internet-of-things. Previously, he was a visiting professor with MIT, and a senior research fellow with A*STAR in Singapore. He received the Ph.D. from University of Cambridge and B.Eng. from the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He has been on the program committees of top conferences in smart energy systems, such as ACM e-Energy, ACM BuildSys and IEEE SmartGridComm. He is a TPC co-chair of ACM e-Energy 2018. Further information about his research can be found at http://www.SmartSustainability.org/

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Sustainable and Resilient Design of Emerging Technologies and Urban Infrastructures

Dr. Shauhrat S. Chopra

Postdoctoral Researcher
Institute for Environmental Science and Policy
University of Illinois at Chicago

Date: 10 July 2017 (Monday)
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Venue: Room B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Cascading impacts of disruptive events including natural disasters like 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, infrastructure failures like the 2001 U.S. North-east Blackout, and epidemics like the H1N1 influenza are indicative of inherent vulnerability of our complex, highly interconnectedsociety. This vulnerability is further exacerbated by the threats of climate change and theuncertainty of their magnitude. Therefore, it is important to investigate the sources ofvulnerabilities and their mechanisms of propagation in order to prepare urban infrastructure for aresilient response. This presentation will discuss the integration of resilience thinking intomathematical models for sustainability assessment that can be viewed as a tool to informresearch, investment, and policy decisions. Unlike traditional approaches which predominantlyfocus on reducing environmental risks, the resilience-based approaches are better suited forunderstanding the tradeoffs between impacts and benefits in order to avoid unintendedconsequences of design decisions. I will describe applications and give examples of such toolsfor prospective assessment of sustainability and resilience of the built environment. In particular,I will explain how resilience thinking is applicable to both the design of urban criticalinfrastructure systems and the sustainable design of emerging technologies such as nano-enabledproducts whose potential environmental and health impacts are still unknown.

About the Speaker

Dr. Shauhrat S. Chopra obtained his Integrated Masters of Science in Systems Biology from the University of Hyderabad, India in 2011. He received his PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh, USA, in 2015. His doctoral dissertation was focused on resilience of complex systems including economic, industrial symbiosis, and critical infrastructure systems at national and regional levels. Currently, Shauhrat works as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Institute for Environmental Science and Policy, the University of Illinois at Chicago, on the U.S. EPA funded LCnano project focused on sustainable design of future transformative nano-enabled products. His data driven research is focused on designing indicators for sustainability and resilience of the built environment in support of environmental decision-making.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Watching Reactions Take Place at the Atomic Scale (and Learning From Them)

Dr. Neeraj SHARMA

Senior Lecturer & ARC DECRA Fellow
School of Chemistry
The University of New South Wales, Australia

Date: 28 June 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 04:30 p.m. – 05:30 p.m.
Venue: B5-309, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The majority of the research undertaken in my group focuses on making better batteries to meet the demands of emerging applications. A large proportion of the function of batteries arises from the electrodes, and these are in turn mediated by the atomic-scale perturbations or changes in the crystal structure during an electrochemical process (e.g. battery use). Therefore, a method to both understand battery function and improve their performance is to probe the crystal structure evolution in operando, i.e., while an electrochemical process is occurring inside a battery.

So, in my group we use in operando neutron powder diffraction, with its sensitivity towards lithium, to literally track the evolution of lithium in electrode materials used in rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. In addition, the ability to test smaller samples (e.g. in coin cells) with in operando X-ray powder diffraction has allowed us to probe other battery types, such as primary lithium and ambient temperature rechargeable sodium-ion batteries, and other configurations, such as thin film devices. With the information from these experiments we have directly related electrochemical properties such as capacity, battery lifetime and differences in charge/discharge to the content and distribution of lithium or sodium in the electrode crystal structures.

We are expanding our footprint in both the analytical techniques we use and the reactions we explore. Recent work has been directed towards realizing in operando neutron imaging, in operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and in situ solid-state NMR allowing us to probe non-crystalline components in devices. We are also investigating formation reactions, i.e., literally watching synthesis of crystalline materials, and tracking the distribution of electrolytes during processes. The combination of these techniques and reactions provides more insight into the mechanism of device operation and the interactions at play.

Finally, materials discovery plays a large part in our synthetic work. We have two new research dimensions underway, the electrochemical tuning of the negative thermal expansion materials to obtain zero thermal expansion materials and the scaffolding of layer-structured electrode materials to increase electrochemical performance in rechargeable batteries.

This talk will provide a flavor of the work being undertaken in my group, emphasizing the highlights and our future directions.

About the Speaker

Neeraj completed his Ph.D. at The University of Sydney then moved to the Bragg Institute at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) for a post-doc. He is currently a senior lecturer at UNSW, holding an Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Award (DECRA) transitioning in 2016 from an Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) Research Fellowship. Neeraj has been the Royal Australian Chemical Institute (RACI) Nyholm Youth Lecturer (2013/2014), won the NSW Young Tall Poppy Award and the UNSW Excellence Award for Early Career Research in 2014. Neeraj has over 90 publications and has been invited to present his work at over 20 conferences. Neeraj’s research interests are based on solid state chemistry, designing new materials and investigating their structure-property relationships. He loves to undertake in situ or operando experiments of materials inside full devices, especially batteries, in order to elucidate the structural subtleties that lead to superior performance parameters. Neeraj’s projects are typically highly collaborative working with colleagues from all over the world with a range of skillsets. Neeraj also enjoys science communication and has been actively involved in projects such as www.crystalsinthecity.com.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Technologies to Understand the Role of Complexity in Atmospheric Aerosol

Dr. David Topping

Senior Lecturer
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
The University of Manchester

Date: 28 June 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 02:00 p.m. – 03:00 p.m.
Venue: B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Aerosol particles are ubiquitous components of the earth's atmosphere. They affect the earth's radiative balance through scattering and absorption of radiation, and are also widely acknowledged as key determinants of air quality. Comprised of both inorganic and organic compounds, the latter could potentially comprise millions of compounds. Over many years the global research community have developed modelling and measurement capabilities designed to better understand their evolution and impacts. With these, we continue to hypothesise and identify new processes and molecular species deemed important. This, however, presents challenges that require novel technological developments. Atmospheric science is reaching a crossroad of exploration. Attempts to address climatic and health impacts implies improving the knowledge on aerosol composition and properties yet, sooner or later, we must take decisions on what to do with the complexity of both. Presently, I feel we do not have appropriate technologies or model development ethos to answer this. In this talk, I will present developments in a range of areas that attempt to address this challenge in a holistic way.

About the Speaker

Dr David Topping obtained BSc in Physics and PhD from the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) in 2001 and in 2005 respectively. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences in the University of Manchester. His research interests focus on building computational models of atmospheric aerosol particles for use in interpretation of measured properties and as sub models for incorporation into climate change models. This broad classification masks a hierarchy of models and techniques with greatly varying complexity and range of applicability.  In addition, the research area is highly multi-disciplinary, covering: Physics, Chemistry, Numerical methods and Computational Science.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Colloquium: Smart City and Smart Industry: A HKPC perspective

Dr. Lawrence Chi-chong CHEUNG

Director, Technology Development
The Hong Kong Productivity Council (HKPC)

Date: 21 June 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 5:30 p.m.
Venue: G4302, 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

HKPC has been serving the Hong Kong Industry for 50 years with a wide range of services ranging from environment, manufacturing technology as well as automotive technology.   With the latest trend in Smart “everything”, HKPC has grouped its services into 2 key themes: Smart Industry and Smart City.  In this way, industry and potential partners alike can easily note the type of services that HKPC is offering.   In this seminar, Dr Cheung will give an overview of the Smart City and Smart Industry technology trends as well as some successful R&D outcome with a view of illustrating what HKPC has been doing and how some services are offered in partnership with other R&D institutions and universities.

About the Speaker

Dr. Lawrence Cheung has over 25 years of experience in research and development, consultancy and business. He manages a broad business portfolio on technological research and development as well as consultancy services in automotive, smart electronics, robotics and automation, medical devices, environmental management, smart materials and manufacturing technology and testing services etc.

He is currently the Vice Chairman of Hong Kong Wireless Technology Industry Association; Honorary Advisor of the Hong Kong Electronics and Technologies Association; an executive committee member of the Hong Kong Electronic Industries Association; an executive committee member of the Hong Kong Modern Enterprise Integration and Innovation Association; Member of Radio Spectrum and Technical Standards Advisory Committee (SSAC) of HKSAR Government Office of Communications Authority; Member of VTC Electronics and Telecommunications Training Board and Committee of Technologies Training of Vocational Training Council.

Prior to joining HKPC, Dr. Cheung was living in Australia holding a senior research post in Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) of Australia. He obtained Bachelor of Engineering with honours and Bachelor of Science degrees from Monash University in Australia. His doctorate degree was also from Monash University.  Dr. Cheung joined HKPC in 1996.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

New and Growing Threats to the Ozone Layer

Prof. Claire REEVES

Professor of Atmospheric Science
School of Environmental Sciences
University of East Anglia

Date: 14 June 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 09:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Venue: B5-416, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Ozone-depleting substances emitted through human activities (e.g. chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and their intermediate replacements the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs)) cause large-scale damage to the stratospheric ozone layer, and influence global climate. Consequently, the production of many of these substances has been phased out through the Montreal Protocol. However, we have identified new threats to the ozone layer: 1) previously undetected CFCs; 2) concentrations of some CFCs and HCFCs that are continuing to increase and 3) rapidly increasing concentrations of very short lived substances (VSLS) which, owing to their relatively short atmospheric lifetimes (less than 6 months), are not regulated under the Montreal Protocol. Measurements in East and South East Asia suggest sources of these compounds in this region and the significance of this for the VSLS is that, despite their short lifetimes, they can be transported to the stratosphere through deep tropical convection.

About the Speaker

Professor Claire REEVES is an atmospheric scientist and her main interests are in tropospheric ozone chemistry and in halogenated gases that are stratospheric ozone depleting and greenhouse gases. She came to UEA as a student in 1983 and loved it so much that she never left. Initially she studied for a BSc in Environmental Sciences before obtaining a PhD in Atmospheric Science. She was then employed as a researcher for 15 years on various projects and, for a couple of years, supported by the National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCAS). In 2005 she began a RCUK Academic Fellowship, becoming a Reader in 2010 and subsequently a Professor in 2014. She teaches atmospheric chemistry and is currently the Deputy Head of the School of Environmental Sciences.

By training, she is a theoretical modeller, but her research activities focus on the interpretation of field data. This has included data from the Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory on the North Norfolk coast and other sites in the UK, Ireland, Australia and Malaysia. She has been involved in many campaigns using the Met. Office C-130 aircraft and the Facility for Atmospheric Airborne Research (FAAM) BAE-146 aircraft, including major international collaborative experiments flying over the Atlantic (ICARTT) and West Africa (AMMA). She has also investigated long term trends of trace gases derived from analysing samples from an archive of air collected in Tasmania, Australia, and from air trapped in firn (unconsolidated snow).

Her research on tropospheric ozone has focused on the processes that control its temporal and spatial trends, in particular the roles of long range transport and biogenic emissions, along with the chemistry of peroxy radicals, peroxides and alkyl nitrates. Her work on halogenated gases has largely involved modelling the atmospheric budgets of these gases using measurements of their atmospheric concentrations as constraints. She has been a co-author of the UNEP/WMO Scientific Assessments of Ozone Depletion that are used by the Parties to the Montreal Protocol to amend their controls on ozone depleting substances.

She is on the NCAS Executive Committee and is a core member of the NERC Peer Review College.