About SEAM

SEAMĀ® is an industry-CityU joint project and established through generous donations and sponsorships from industries.
Technologies are paramount to our everyday life. In the office, on the street, or just drinking a glass of water. All this seemingly simple everyday life will be impossible without the support of technology. However, while our life can be support by technologies, what then is supporting the technologies itself? Water pipeline may leak, cars component may fail, and bridge cable will rust. How then, can we detect these things before the failure occurred? How do we provide effective maintenance and fault detection?

That's what this laboratory is all about. The Smart Engineering Asset Management (SEAM) Laboratory was established to do throughout research into equipment maintenance and quality inspection. SEAM is aimed to introduce the latest technology to local professionals, engineers and organizations. With the support from the Croucher Optical Nondestructive Testing (CNDT) , which is also a SEEM laboratory committed to quality inspection, SEAM is able to achieve breakthrough in its research.

Ir Dr. Peter Tse is currently the Director of SEAM and CNDT, and the Associate Professor in the Department of Systems Engineering and Engineering Management. Currently, SEAM has collaboration and consultancy projects with over 30 local and overseas companies, including public utilities, manufacturers and transportation service providers, energy production companies etc. SEAM organizes seminars and trainings for practitioners from time to time.

Equipment health monitoring is the key to prevent equipment failures that may cause human injuries or economic losses. The most prominent systems developed by SEAM is the Smart Asset Maintenance System (SAMS), which, as its namesake, encompasses a series of advanced virtual instruments and database management for machine health monitoring and fault diagnosis.

SAMS has been well adopted by the industry. It is used to monitor the coal milling machines for power generation, traction motors for underground trains, chillers for shopping malls and buildings, production lines for electronic and beverage manufacturing, slurry pumps for oil production and exploration etc.

Contact Method

Ir. Dr. Peter W. Tse
Department of Systems Engineering & Engineering Management
City University of Hong Kong
Tat Chee Ave., Kowloon, Hong Kong, P.R.C
Tel: (852) 3442 8431 or 3442 2651
Fax: (852) 3442 0415
E-mail: meptse@cityu.edu.hk