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More than 40 new inventions and innovative ideas from CityU are on display at the Innovation Expo 2001 from 22-26 November at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre.
Since 1994, the University has sponsored excellence in teaching by recognizing and rewarding distinguished teachers with the Teaching Excellence Award.
The CityU Debate Team took the first runners up title in the Inter-Collegiate Putonghua Debate Contest organized by the Radio Television Hong Kong this year. In the final contest held at Shatin New Town Plaza on 11 November, the CityU Team argued against the motion: "Should the Hong Kong Press Council be exempt from libel charges? " The rival team, from Hong Kong Baptist University, won the championship and will later represent Hong Kong in a national debate competition to be held in Shanghai.
CityU's Centre for Cross-Cultural Studies (CCS), two years in preparation, finally made its official debut on 12 October. World-renowned sinologist and author of modern Chinese studies, Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University, delivered a public lecture on "The Image of China in the West: Accident or Design?"to a packed audience at the Wei Hing Theatre.
Starting from the academic year 2002-03, CityU will introduce scholarships to recognize outstanding freshmen in the humanities and social sciences disciplines who have excelled in the Hong Kong Advanced Level Examination.
Arecent addition to the CityU scene, the Southeast Asia Research Centre (SEARC) is fast gaining a reputation as a unique research institution. Inaugurated in February 2001, the Centre has spent the past 10 months hiring new staff-one senior research fellow is already on board and there are two others on their way-receiving and funding research applications, putting a series of working papers on its website and offering a range of seminars.
CityU's Wei Hing Theatre was packed on the evening of 12 October for the Public Launch of the Centre for Cross-Cultural Studies. Following welcoming remarks by CityU President Professor H K Chang, Professor Matthew Chen, Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences reminded the audience of the importance of cross-cultural understanding, especially in the light of current events.
In Hong Kong, youth research under colonial rule was primarily remedial in nature, focusing on topics such as outreach services and rehabilitation programmes, whereas youth research post-1997 emphasizes the cultivation of leadership and patriotism, social participation, as well as the adoption of a global or Greater China perspective.
To deepen understanding of the psychosocial, cultural, and political issues facing youth today, the Youth Studies Net (YSNet) (http://www.cityu.edu.hk/prj/YSNet) was founded jointly by the Department of Applied Social Studies and the Division of Social Studies in March 2000.
Think of your favourite idols. Would they include Magic Johnson, Zhou Enlai, or Faye Wong by any chance? Now think of the most creative Chinese minds, historical or modern. Would Confucius, Sun Yat-sen, or I M Pei appear on your list? To learn more about adolescent idol worship in different Chinese cities and young people's perceptions of the most creative figures, Dr Yue Xiaodong of the Department of Applied Social Studies conducted two lines of research over the last few years.

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