News

by Noel Laam

CityU Burgundy
On the sunny afternoon of 29 July 2021, the Special Interest Group for High-Performance Computing (SIGHPC) of the Joint Universities Computer Centre (JUCC) met at the City University of Hong Kong and visited CityU’s newly installed High-Performance Computing (HPC) facility, the CityU Burgundy. The ...

by Joe Lee

Introduction In the old days, High Performance Computing (HPC) implies extremely expensive hardware and software installations, intensive training to get accustomed to unfamiliar tools and working environment, heavy administration costs for daily operations, only relevant to complex, large scale and ...

by Joe Lee

The Computing Services Centre (CSC) launched its first in-house high performance computer service (through the node named Thomas) to facilitate academic research in 2001 in order to provide supporting services to many research needs when computing resources were expensive and uncommon. This computer ...

by Joe Lee

The High Performance Computer, SUN Enterprise 10000 Server, has recently been upgraded with the addition of 24 CPUs and 12 GB memory giving a full swing of 64 CPUs, 26 GB memory and 27 Gflops computation. Normally the entire machine will be configured as a single domain for the sole use of CityU ...

by Joe Lee

Inside the Enterprise Competency Centre (ECC), there stands the high-performance computer, Sun Enterprise 10000 system, with 40 (400MHz, 8MB cache) CPUs, 14GB memory and 216 GB disk space, providing over 17Gflops of processing power. It is particularly useful for research projects that require ...

by Noel Laam

To allow application software vendors and enterprise customers in Hong Kong to benchmark their wares, and to enable CityU colleagues to carry out highly CPU intensive work or research projects, the University and Sun Microsystems have established a HK$20 million worth Enterprise Competency Centre ...

by Peter Mok

In the past, the issue of setting up a supercomputing facility in the University was raised a few times but turned down due to a number of reasons. First of all, supercomputing is only required for large scale and number crunching applications which are, if any, rare in the University. It is ...