Student Advising Handbook

  1. INTRODUCTION
  2. SCHOOL OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT
  3. LIST OF FACULTY MEMBERS
  4. ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES AND COURSES
    1. Undergraduate Majors
    2. Major in Energy Science and Engineering (ESE)
      1. (a)Aims
      2. (b)Intended Learning Outcomes of Major
      3. (c)Recommended Study Plan
      4. (d)List of Courses Available at CityU to Fulfil the Requirement of "School-specified Courses"
    3. Major in Environmental Science and Engineering (EVE)
      1. (a)Aims
      2. (b)Intended Learning Outcomes of Major
      3. (c)Recommended Study Plan
    4. Structure and Assessment of Majors
    5. Student Exchange and Internship Programmes
  5. STUDENT ADVISING
    1. Undergraduate Degree Management Team
    2. Roles and Responsibilities of Academic Advisors and Student Mentors
    3. Roles and Responsibilities of Students
    4. Mechanism and Procedures of Student Advising
    5. Academic Honesty
    6. Appeal Mechanism
    7. DegreeWorks
    8. Guidance on Whole Person and Career Development
  6. USEFUL CONTACTS (ON-CAMPUS)
  7. USEFUL LINKS

 

I. INTRODUCTION

This Handbook contains useful information for students admitted to the School of Energy and Environment (SEE) and to be enrolled in the undergraduate degree of Bachelor of Engineering in Energy Science and Engineering or Bachelor of Engineering in Environmental Science and Engineering.

Students are advised to familiarize themselves with this Handbook so as to obtain a general overview of the School including its majors and courses at undergraduate level and the student advising system. It is, however, intended to be read in conjunction with other official information posted by the other units such as the Academic Regulations and Records Office (ARRO), Career and Leadership Centre (CLC), Student Development Services (SDS) and Student Residence Office (SRO).

It should also be pointed out that updates on this Handbook will be made from time to time when necessary. 

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II. SCHOOL OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT

The School of Energy and Environment – the first and still the only one in Hong Kong – was founded in July 2009 with the mission to perform cutting-edge research and provide professional education in energy- and environment- related issues.  Never before have such issues become so important worldwide, and they are in fact on the top agenda of every region/country.  The critical question is how enough energy can be produced to sustain economic growth but at the same time the effects on the environment in the production and use of energy can be minimized.  Conversely, the carbon footprint in mitigating environmental problems must also be considered.  The School is therefore designed to tackle this interactive relationship between energy and environment through the development of new scientific understanding and new technologies as well as the training of new professionals with broad knowledge in the areas of energy and environment.

Vision

The School aims to be a leading School in the Asia-Pacific region specializing in cutting-edge research in energy and environment and in the training of energy and environment professionals.

Mission

  • Advancing research in targeted themes of benefit to societal needs in energy, environment, and sustainability;
  • Educating engineers and professionals at undergraduate and graduate levels adopting holistic approaches which provide innovative solutions to local and regional problems in energy, environment, and sustainability;
  • Maintaining a collaborative and supportive atmosphere for students, faculty, alumni and other stakeholders in advancing our interdisciplinary research and educational objectives.

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III. LIST OF FACULTY MEMBERS

  Name Tel. No. Email
(…@cityu.edu.hk)
Dean and Chair Professor of Atmospheric Environment Professor Chak K. CHAN 3442 5593 seedean
 
Associate Dean (Research and Graduate Studies) and Professor Professor Michael LEUNG 3442 4626 mkh.leung
 
Associate Dean (Undergraduate Studies) and Associate Professor Dr. Patrick LEE 3442 4625 patrick.kh.lee
 
Chair Professor of Atmospheric Science Professor Johnny CHAN 3442 7820 Johnny.Chan
 
Chair Professor of Environmental Chemistry Professor Peter BRIMBLECOMBE 3442 4676 pbrimble
 
Associate Professor Dr. Walid DAOUD 3442 4499 wdaoud
  Dr. Carol LIN 3442 7497 carollin
  Dr. Zhi NING 3442 4620 zhi.ning
  Dr. Ian RIDLEY 3442 4761 ian.ridley
  Dr. Wey Yang TEOH 3442 4627 wyteoh
  Dr. Masaru YARIME 3442 2322 myarime
  Dr. Wen ZHOU 3442 7816 wenzhou
 
Assistant Professor Dr. Alicia AN 3442 9626 alicia.kjan
  Dr. Sam HSU 3442 5412 sam.hyhsu
  Dr. Nicky LAM 3442 9625 yunflam
  Dr. Chunhua LIU 3442 2885 chunliu
  Dr. Keith NGAN 3442 6702 keith.ngan
  Dr. Jin SHANG 3442 7714 jinshang
  Dr. Patrick SIT 3442 6709 patrick.h.sit
  Dr. Denis YU 3442 6885 denisyu
  Dr. Lin ZHANG 3442 4012 l.zhang

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IV. ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES AND COURSES

1. Undergraduate Majors

For admission to the School of Energy and Environment (SEE), students will apply through the Joint University Programmes Admissions System (JUPAS) or the route of direct / non-JUPAS application subject to their individual qualifications.

During the first year, students will be admitted with an undeclared major and study a broad range of Gateway Education (GE) courses as well as core-curricular courses designed by the School. After one year of study in the School, they will enter one of the following majors:

- Bachelor of Engineering in Energy Science and Engineering (BEngESE)
- Bachelor of Engineering in Environmental Science and Engineering (BEngEVE)

2. Major in Energy Science and Engineering (ESE)

Major : Energy Science and Engineering
能源科學及工程學
Degree : Bachelor of Engineering
工學士
Award Title : Bachelor of Engineering in Energy Science and Engineering
工學士 (能源科學及工程學)
Mode of Attendance : Full-time study
Duration : Four years

(a) Aims

This major aims to create a new generation of intellects/graduates capable of discovering and providing innovative solutions to the intricate issues of energy crisis, renewable energy, global warming, climate change and pollution. Such holistic education breaking down the barriers associated with traditional schools of knowledge is required to address our future energy security and its associated environmental issues, both locally and globally.

(b) Intended Learning Outcomes of Major

Upon successful completion of this Major, students should be able to:

  1. apply knowledge of mathematics, science, technology and engineering appropriate to energy science and engineering degree discipline;
  2. design and conduct experimental investigations to acquire relevant information, as well as to critically analyse and interpret data;
  3. address energy supply, demand and security issues and their associated environmental impacts in a global and societal context;
  4. pursue development of innovative technologies that can generate clean and sustainable energy to address energy scarcity and combat pollution and climate change;
  5. assess impacts of implementation of energy technologies on sustainability;
  6. use the computer/IT tools relevant to the energy and energy-related environmental disciplines along with an understanding of their processes and limitations;
  7. design a system, component or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints, such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability and sustainability;
  8. communicate effectively and function in multi-disciplinary teams;
  9. be conversant with professional, social, ethical, health and safety responsibilities of a competent engineer; and
  10. recognise the need for, and engage in, life-long learning and stay abreast of contemporary issues.

(c) Recommended Study Plan

Recommended Study Plan (2013 Cohort)
Recommended Study Plan (2014 Cohort with Normative 4-year Degree)
Recommended Study Plan (2014 Cohort with Advanced Standing I)
Recommended Study Plan (2015 Cohort with Normative 4-year Degree)
Recommended Study Plan (2016 Cohort with Normative 4-year Degree)
Recommended Study Plan (2016 Cohort with Advanced Standing I)
Recommended Study Plan (2017 Cohort with Normative 4-year Degree)
Recommended Study Plan (2017 Cohort with Advanced Standing I)


(d) List of Courses Available at CityU to Fulfil the Requirement of "School-specified Courses"

The following list of courses is proposed to the ESE undergraduate students of 2014 to 2016 Cohorts for fulfilling the requirement of “School-specified Courses”.

Course

 

Offering
Academic Unit

Credit Units

CA3154

Computer Application in Construction

Architecture and Civil Engineering

3

CA3791

Computer Aided Design Practices

3

CA4182

Advanced Computer Aided Design

3

MBE2016

Engineering Graphics

Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering

3

MBE3007

CAD/CAM

3

SEE3201

Atmospheric Science – An Introductory Survey

School of Energy and Environment

3

SEE4111

Nuclear Energy Engineering

3

SEE4113

Nanotechnology in Energy Conversion and Storage: Concepts and Creative Science

3

SEE4114

Bioenergy Engineering: Principles and Applications

3

SEE4115

Energy Catalysis and Reaction Engineering

3

SEE4116

Energy and Carbon Auditing

3

SEE4117 Solar Energy Engineering 3
SEE4118 Wind and Marine Energy 3
SEE4119 Electrical Energy Conversion 3
SEE4120 Materials Engineering for Energy Storage Applications 3

SEE4202

Atmospheric Chemistry

3

SEE4205

Design of Smart Cities and Sustainable Building

3

SEE4216

Air Pollution Measurement and Control

3

SEE4218

Water Quality Engineering

3

 

3. Major in Environmental Science and Engineering (EVE)

Major : Environmental Science and Engineering
環境科學及工程學
Degree : Bachelor of Engineering
工學士
Award Title : Bachelor of Engineering in Environmental Science and Engineering
工學士 (環境科學及工程學)
Mode of Attendance : Full-time study
Duration : Four years

(a) Aims

This major aims to provide professional education to train students to be knowledgeable in environmental science and engineering so that they can work as environmental professionals contributing to improved environmental performance and sustainability.  The programme objectives are:

  1. To provide students with broad-based knowledge and fundamentals of environmental science and engineering with three streams, namely environmental technology, sustainability and environmental management, and environmental science;
  2. To produce graduates who can perform competently as environmental professionals, scientists and engineers in commercial, industrial and non-governmental organizations, civil services and educational institutions;
  3. To produce graduates that are aware of global, societal, ethical and professional issues and responsibilities in the practice of environmental science and engineering and make contributions to the betterment of the society; and
  4. To nurture students’ ability to engage in life-long learning and professional development.

(b) Intended Learning Outcomes of Major

Upon successful completion of this Major, students should be able to:

  1. Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering and state-of-the-art technology in the environmental science and engineering disciplines;
  2. Design and conduct environmental engineering experiments, analyse data and interpret data;
  3. Design a system, component, or process in environmental engineering context to meet desired needs within realistic constraints, such as environmental, economic, social, political, ethical, health and safety, and sustainability;
  4. Pursue development of innovative technologies that can solve environmental problems and/or achieve sustainable development;
  5. Explain sustainability in a societal, environmental, and economic context;
  6. Explain basic concepts in management, policy and economics;
  7. Communicate effectively and function in multi-disciplinary teams;
  8. Be conversant with professional, social, ethical, health and safety responsibilities of a competent engineer;
  9. Use the computer/IT tools relevant to the environmental disciplines along with an understanding of their processes and limitations; and
  10. Recognise the need for, and engage in, life-long learning, and stay abreast of contemporary issues.

(c) Recommended Study Plan

Recommended Study Plan (2017 Cohort with Normative 4-year Degree)

4. Structure and Assessment of Majors

Period of Study

The undergraduate degrees, Bachelor of Engineering in Energy Science and Engineering and Bachelor of Engineering in Environmental Science and Engineering, are operated under the Credit Unit System.  Each of them comprises 120-144 credit units (normative 4-year degree) to be taken normally within four academic years.  Each academic year comprises two 13-week semesters, Semester A and Semester B as well as a 7-week summer term.

Curriculum Structure

The undergraduate degrees consist of courses in the following categories:

  • Gateway Education (GE) Requirements
  • School Requirement
  • Major Requirement
  • Minor / Free Electives (optional)
(i) Gateway Education (GE) Requirements (30 credit units)

Students should take a range of GE core courses designed to help students adapt to university life and prepare for academic success in the following years.  There are three main categories under the Gateway Education Requirements: (A) University Requirements, (B) Distributional Requirements and (C) School-specified courses.

A. University Requirements (Core Courses) (9 credit units)

  • GE English (6 credit units)

    The GE English comprises two academic English courses, namely University English and Discipline Specific English.

    Course Code Course Title Level Credit Units Remarks
    GE1401 University English B1 3 University English – focuses on more general aspects of English rhetoric, composition, argumentation and critical reading and writing.
    GE2401
    OR
    GE2410
    English for Science
    OR
    English for Engineering
    B2 3 Discipline Specific English – focuses on more discipline specific aspects of English.

    Students should select either GE2401 or GE2410.

    Students who have achieved Level 4 (or above) in HKDSE English Language will enter the above GE English courses directly. Those whose entry qualification in English falls below Level 4 in HKDSE English Language are required to complete the two courses, EL0200A English for Academic Purposes 1 and EL0200B English for Academic Purposes 2, prior to taking the above GE English courses. Students who have achieved a grade B or above in their overall course results for EL0200A will be permitted to exit the programme at this point. They will achieve 3 credits and also be considered to have satisfied the pre-requisite for entry to the GE English courses. The credits earned from taking EL0200A (3 credit units) and/or EL0200B (3 credit units) will not be counted towards the minimum credit units required for graduation and will not be included in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average (CGPA).

    For students whose entry qualifications are not HKDSE, the English Language Centre will invite them to sit for an English Placement Test to determine which English courses they should study. Students may, instead of taking the Test, provide an alternative English proficiency qualification (e.g. TOEFL or IELTS) for consideration by the English Language Centre. A waiver from taking EL0200A and/or EL0200B may be granted for students who have achieved the required English proficiency. For details, please consult the English Language Centre.


  • Chinese Civilisation – History and Philosophy (3 credit units)

    The course helps students explore both the past and present issues in Chinese history and philosophy and also the students’ self-identity in the modern world. 

    To enable non-Chinese speaking students to have a better understanding of Chinese civilisation, specific course sections for these students will be offered.

    Course Code Course Title Level Credit Units Remarks
    GE1501 Chinese Civilisation – History and Philosophy B1 3 Individual sessions will be tailor-made for non-local and non-Chinese speaking students

    Students who have achieved Level 4 (or above) in HKDSE Chinese Language or whose entry qualifications are not HKDSE are required to take the course, GE1501 Chinese Civilisation – History and Philosophy, only. Those whose entry qualification in Chinese falls below Level 4 in HKDSE Chinese Language are required to complete the 3-credit course, CHIN1001 University Chinese I, in addition to GE1501. The credits earned from taking CHIN1001 will not be counted towards the minimum credit units required for graduation and will not be included in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average (CGPA).

B. Distributional Requirements (12 credit units)

Students are also required to take 12 credit units of GE courses, where at least 9 credit units should be taken in the first year.  At least 3 credit units should be chosen from each of the following Distributional Areas in addition to the GE core courses on GE English and Chinese Civilisation – History and Philosophy:

For the most updated information on the GE Requirements and the courses in each of the Areas, please visit the website of the Office of Education Development and Gateway Education (EDGE):
http://www.cityu.edu.hk/edge/ge/ge_requirements_new.htm

C. School-specified courses (9 credit units)

Students of 2014 and 2015 Cohorts:

Students can take any non-GE courses to fulfil the requirement. However, they are highly recommended to discuss with their academic advisors before registering for any.

Students of 2016 Cohort:

Course Code Course Title Level Credit Units

MBE2016

Engineering Graphics

B2

3

Plus any non-GE course

Students of 2017 Cohort and thereafter:

Course Code Course Title Level Credit Units

MBE2016

Engineering Graphics

B2

3

SEE1003

Introduction to Sustainable Energy and Environmental Engineering

B1

3

SEE3002

Energy and Environmental Economics

B3

3

(ii) School Requirement (18 credit units)

The courses of the School Requirement provide the students a strong foundation of understanding of the natural sciences and mathematics for pursuing science and engineering studies.

Course Code Course Title Level Credit Units Remarks
AP1201 General Physics I B1 3  
BCH1100 Chemistry B1 3  
BCH1200 Discovery in Biology B1 3  
MA1200 Calculus and Basic Linear Algebra I B1 3 Select either MA1200 or MA1300
MA1300 Enhanced Calculus and Linear Algebra I B1 3
MA1201 Calculus and Basic Linear Algebra II B1 3 Select either MA1201 or MA1301
MA1301 Enhanced Calculus and Linear Algebra II B1 3
SEE1002^ Introduction to Computing for Energy and Environment B1 3  
^ Students of 2013 and 2014 Cohorts are required to take CS1102 Introduction to Computer Studies or CS1302 Introduction to Computer Programming instead of SEE1002 Introduction to Computing for Energy and Environment.

 

(iii) Major Requirement (72 credit units for ESE; 74 credit units for EVE)

The Major Requirement consists of the Basic Core Courses, the Major Core Courses and the Electives.  The Basic Core Courses provide students further knowledge in energy/environmental sciences, mathematics and statistics and engineering fundamentals needed to undertake critical analysis work applicable to the energy/environmental science and engineering disciplines.  Built upon the Basic Core Courses, the Major Core Courses and Electives provide students with a systematic, theory-based knowledge of energy and environmental fundamentals, policy, economics, project management and professionalism, and guide the students to apply knowledge and skills they have developed to explore their individual interests through different electives, internship, student exchange programme and final year project.

(iv) Minor / Free Electives (optional)

In addition to the Gateway Education Requirements, School Requirement and Major Requirement, students may select minors or any available course as part of their study but the study load should not exceed 144 credit units (normative 4-year degree) or 114 credit units (Advanced Standing I).

Minors comprise a structured group of courses totaling at least 15 credit units, allowing for significant exposure to a subject area or topic of professional interest.

Courses chosen by students from any available course, not specifically excluded by the major and for which they have the prerequisites, will be counted as free electives.

ESE Curricula of 2013 to 2017 Cohorts
2013    2014    2015    2016    2017

EVE Curriculum of 2017 Cohort
2017

Study Load

According to the University regulation, one credit unit is earned for approximately 40 to 50 hours of student work over a semester.  The “rules of thumb” approved by the Senate is that one lecture hour, or one tutorial hour per week for a semester requires student work sufficient to earn one credit unit; and one laboratory hour per week for a semester requires student work sufficient to earn half of a credit unit.

Minimum Passing Requirement

Students must satisfy the following minimum passing requirements for courses offered by the School:

To pass a course, a student must achieve ALL of the following:

  • obtain at least 30% of the total marks allocated towards coursework (combination of assignments, pop quizzes, term paper, lab reports and/ or quiz, if applicable);
  • obtain at least 30% of the total marks allocated towards final examination (if applicable); and
  • meet the criteria listed in the section on Assessment Rubrics.

As for courses offered by other academic units, the corresponding minimum passing requirements may vary.  Students are advised to refer to the course catalogue or approach the respective Course Leaders for details.

Course Grades
Assessment and Progression

As for the assessment of the academic work, students will receive a grade for each course which will be used to calculate Grade Point Average (GPA).

CGPA (For the calculation of Grade Point Average (GPA), G is the grade point awarded, U is the credit units earned for the ith course.  CGPA is calculated for courses taken during enrolment for a specific programme/degree, I = 1-n are all courses completed at the time of the calculation.  For the conversion between Grade and Grade Point Awarded, please refer to the section “Course Grades – Grade Table”.)

The overall performance of students is measured by two types of GPA, a Semester GPA (SGPA) and a Cumulative GPA (CGPA) which will be calculated at the end of a semester.  SGPA will only be calculated based on the courses registered in that particular semester while CGPA is calculated for all courses taken during enrolment for a specific programme.  The classification of students’ awards will be based on the CGPA.

In the calculation of a student’s SGPA and CGPA, grades of P, I, IP, TR, Z, WD, X and AU are not counted while grades of F are included.  However, the “F” grade will not be counted in student’s CGPA if the “F” grade is recovered by repeating the same course.  Students should bear in mind that some courses are only offered in alternate years.  Hence, if they fail these courses, they may not be able to repeat them in the following academic year.  Besides, course grades for all attempts will appear on the student's transcript, but only the latest grade earned will be included in the calculation of the student's GPA.

Under the Credit Unit System, the “D” grade is equivalent to a grade point of only 1.0.  “D” is a grade confirming that a student has sufficient familiarity with the subject matter to enable the student to progress without repeating the course.  However, grade “D” will pull down the average grade and this could lead to serious problems.  In this regard, students with a “D” grade could consider repeating the course to improve their GPA.  However, students should have thorough consideration on repeating any course as a “F” grade (fail) in the second attempt will stand according to the Academic Regulations for Undergraduate Degrees of the University.

When a student’s SGPA or CGPA falls below 1.70, the student will be given a warning letter issued by the Dean of the School, and the relevant School Examination Board will be informed.  The School Examination Board will then consider the appropriate action.  Students may be advised to reduce their study load in the following semester, or be given an academic warning.  For students who fail a core course three times, or who has a CGPA of less than 1.0, or who consistently fail to maintain satisfactory academic progress as determined by the School Examination Board, the University has the right to terminate student’s studies with the recommendation by the School Examination Board.

Students who are not able to attend an examination or in-course assessment (e.g. assignments, projects, essays, tests, etc.) contributing a weighting of 20% or above to the assessment of a course due to extenuating circumstances such as illness, hospitalization, accident, family bereavement or other unforeseeable serious personal or emotional circumstances should inform the School.  They have to present their cases via AIMS and submit the original of the uploaded supporting document(s) to the School as soon as possible and no later than 5 working days of the examination, or the scheduled date for completing the in-course assessment.  For details of the procedures, please visit the website of Academic Regulations and Records Office (ARRO):
http://www6.cityu.edu.hk/arro/content.asp?cid=171

Academic Standing

Academic standing provides an indicator of the student’s academic progress and identifies students in academic difficulty needing academic advising and extra help.  For details of the four levels of academic standing and the corresponding definitions, please visit the website of Academic Regulations and Records Office (ARRO):
http://www6.cityu.edu.hk/arro/content.asp?cid=169

Requirements for University Awards

To be granted an award of the University, students must achieve ALL of the following:

  • complete at least 120 credit units for students of 2013 to 2016 Cohorts or 121 credit units for students of 2017 Cohort;
  • fulfill the Gateway Education Requirement (30 credit units for students with normative 4-year degree / 21 credit units for students with Advanced Standing I);
  • fulfill the School Requirement;
  • fulfill the Major Requirement; and
  • achieve a CGPA of 1.70 or above.
Classification of Awards (Bachelor’s Degree)

The degree awarded to students will be determined by the student’s home major.  The award title to be shown on the student’s award certificate will be the degree and the home major.  If a student has completed a double major, one award certificate will be issued and the second major will also be shown on the award certificate. 

The University grants bachelor’s degree awards with classifications based on CGPA.  The general guidelines are as follows:

Award CGPA
First Class Honours 3.50 or above
Upper Second Class Honours 3.00 - 3.49
Lower Second Class Honours 2.50 - 2.99
Third Class Honours 2.00 - 2.49
Pass 1.70 - 1.99

 

5. Student Exchange and Internship Programmes

Student Exchange Programme

The School will strive to arrange and support students to participate in short term international exchange programme to discover and increase their understanding of other cultures and traditions, as well as improving their language skills and broadening their horizons.  For details of the exchange programme, please visit the website of SEE:
http://www6.cityu.edu.hk/see/exchange_outbound.htm

Internship

The School will strive to place students in a work environment where they are guided to integrate theory and practice in a real life situation. This will help them gain practical knowledge and skills for employment.  There is an advisory committee in the School that comprises key personnel from governmental departments and enterprises or corporations related to the environment and energy fields.  In addition to providing valuable advice that serves as reference for the School’s development, the committee offers students ample practical training opportunities.

For information related to career and internship, please visit the websites of SEE and Career and Leadership Centre:
http://www6.cityu.edu.hk/see/internship.htm
http://www.cityu.edu.hk/career

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V. STUDENT ADVISING

Student advising is a partnership between the advisor and the student. An academic advisor’s role enables the student to make informed decisions about courses, degrees, careers and other opportunities. Academic advisors are mentors and excellent resources but not the answer to every question or the action takers. Students are responsible to find out the information required, to follow up on suggestions and to take the necessary action to become successful students. Through this partnership, students will be able to make the choices that provide them with the greatest benefit.

As a student of the School of Energy and Environment, you are assigned an academic advisor with whom you must meet individually at least two times during each semester. This is to ensure that you are making good progress. On top of that, freshmen are each assigned a student mentor who assists the mentees in adapting to the new student life by sharing their experience on both academic and non-academic issues. Student advising should be more than discussing classes and degree requirements. Advisors and mentors should serve to inspire and motivate students to a deep, rich, and fulfilling holistic undergraduate experience both in and outside of the classroom.

In addition to your mandatory advising session, you may meet with your advisor during walk-in hours or by making an individual appointment.

1. Undergraduate Degree Management Team

Major Leaders Dr. Patrick SIT (ESE major); Dr. Ian RIDLEY (EVE major)
Admissions Tutor Dr. Patrick LEE
Deputy Admissions Tutor Dr. Patrick SIT
Student Advising Coordinators and
Student Mentoring Coordinators
Dr. Patrick LEE
Dr. Patrick SIT
Staff-Undergraduate Student Consultative Committee Dr. Patrick LEE
Dr. Ian RIDLEY

2. Roles and Responsibilities of Academic Advisors and Student Mentors

Working With Your Advisor and Mentor

Though you as a student are responsible for whatever choices you make, the University realizes that in order to make informed decisions, students need the mentoring and advice of academic advisors and others in the University community. Your academic advisor and student mentor are your primary resource regarding academic issues, opportunities, and programmes and could perhaps be thought of as the coordinator of your educational experiences.

Roles and Responsibilities of Academic Advisors
  • To clarify university policies, regulations, programmes, and procedures about which you may have questions.
  • To offer advice on selecting courses and to assist you in developing an academic plan that satisfies degree requirements.
  • To discuss with you your academic performance and the implications of your performance for the undergraduate degree.
  • To help you explore your interests, abilities, and goals and relate them to academic majors.
Roles and Responsibilities of Student Mentors
  • To assist mentees in adapting to the new student life by sharing their experience on both academic and non-academic issues.
  • To familiarize students with campus resources.

3. Roles and Responsibilities of Students

Academic advisors and student mentors can help you understand fully all of your options and avoid unnecessary mistakes, but only if you take the initiative to participate actively and seek advice from them. Your responsibilities in the advising relationship are:

  • To take the initiative to contact the advisor and/or student mentor.  Be mindful of the need to work with advisors during posted office hours or take the initiative to make other arrangements when necessary.
  • To be familiar with the requirements of the major which you are pursuing, and to schedule courses each semester in accordance with those requirements.
  • To be aware of the prerequisites for each course that you include in your semester schedule and to discuss with your advisor how prerequisites will affect the sequencing of your courses.
  • To follow university procedures for registering courses and for making adjustments to your class schedule.
  • To observe academic deadlines. Do not miss deadlines. Know when to register and when to add or drop classes, etc. Set up appointments with your advisor well in advance of these deadlines.
  • To prepare a list of questions or concerns before each meeting with your advisor and/or mentor. Have a tentative written schedule prepared if you are registering for courses.
  • To keep your advisor informed about changes in your academic progress, course selection, and academic / career goals.
  • To keep a personal record of your progress towards your degree. Organize official university documents (Undergraduate Catalogue, Schedule of Classes, etc.) in a way that enables you to access them when needed.
  • To gather all relevant decision-making information.
  • To ask questions. If you do not understand a policy or a procedure, ask questions until you do understand. Be knowledgeable about policies, procedures and requirements.
  • To inform your advisor or the Dean’s Office immediately whenever a serious problem (medical, financial, personal) disrupts your ability to attend classes or interferes with your ability to focus on your education and to perform your best work.

4. Mechanism and Procedures of Student Advising

Assignment of Academic Advisor and Student Mentor

Your academic advisor is a faculty member (a full-time teaching staff member) in SEE while your student mentor is a senior undergraduate student of the School.  Academic advisors and student mentors are assigned to new students about two weeks before the semester begins.

Meeting with Academic Advisor and Student Mentor

Students are required to meet with their academic advisors individually at least two times per semester to monitor students’ academic progress, develop a long-term plan, and discuss which courses students should take in the following semester.

Individual academic advising is by appointment. General questions can be answered by phone and email. More frequent meetings are encouraged especially if the following concerns arise (but not limited to):

  • New students must meet with their assigned academic advisor during the first semester they begin their studies in CityU.
  • Students on academic probation must meet with their advisor regularly until the probationary status has been cleared.
  • All graduating seniors must meet with an advisor for a graduation check appointment no later than the semester in which they plan to graduate.

Procedures of Student Advising

  • Two faculty members shall be appointed as the Student Advising Coordinators (SAC).
  • The SAC will be in charge of the advising scheme of the School including the coordination in the School as well as liaison with the central offices and other academic units that contribute towards the teaching of SEE students.
  • The SAC may choose to assign students to another academic advisor at a later stage, e.g. the resignation of the original advisor from the university or any unexpected circumstance.
  • At the end of each year, every academic advisor should report to the SAC of any problem that has arisen during the advising process.
  • Course leaders will contact the academic advisors of any student who is experiencing serious academic difficulties in a particular course (such as failure to submit assignments, attendance problems, or poor performance).  In this case, the academic advisors will:
    • Discuss the problem with the course leader first;
    • Request a meeting with the student to identify the source of the problem and discuss steps to tackle it;
    • Have at least one follow-up meeting with the student.  Report to SAC / Major Leader / Programme Committee of any finding and/or corresponding resolution.
  • The academic advisor will direct the student to seek help from the Student Development Services or other concerned parties when necessary.  The academic advisor will generally not attempt to provide counseling on emotional issues to the student when professional help needs to be sought.
  • The academic advisor will not be involved in complaint procedures.  If the student has a complaint, the academic advisor will encourage the student to discuss the problem with the course or major leader and, if these discussions fail to resolve the problem, speak to the Dean, before proceeding with a formal complaint.

5. Academic Honesty

Students must pursue their studies with academic honesty, which is central to the conduct of academic work. Students are expected to present their own work, give proper acknowledgement of other's work, and honestly report findings obtained.  Students will be bound by the City University of Hong Kong Rules on Academic Honesty.

As part of the University’s efforts to educate students about academic honesty, all students are required to complete the online tutorial and quiz on academic honesty and make a declaration on their understanding of academic honesty. 

Please log in to CityU Portal with your CityU Electronic ID through:
CityU Portal » Student » My Learning » Academic Honesty » Online tutorial on academic honesty.

Students can check whether they have fulfilled the requirement through:
AIMS » Student Record » My Status » University Requirement on Academic Honesty

Plagiarism is a serious offence involving the use of ideas and work of others as one’s own without giving proper acknowledgement of other’s work and honestly reporting findings obtained.

Students who commit an act of academic dishonesty which jeopardizes the integrity of the learning and assessment process may be charged and be liable to disciplinary actions.

6. Appeal Mechanism

Review of Course Grades

Students with concerns on course grades should resolve the matter via the procedures outlined at the following link:
http://www6.cityu.edu.hk/arro/content.asp?cid=468#reviewcoursegrades

Review of Examination Board Decisions

Students who have concerns about the School Examination Board's decision should resolve the matter via the procedures outlined at the following link:
http://www6.cityu.edu.hk/arro/content.asp?cid=468#reviewexamboarddecisions .

For the academic regulations on review of course grades and Examination Board Decisions, please visit the website of Academic Regulations and Records Office (ARRO):
http://www6.cityu.edu.hk/arro/content.asp?cid=165#s15

7. DegreeWorks

DegreeWorks is a web-based academic advising and degree audit tool developed for undergraduate students under the 4-year degree curriculum.

DegreeWorks matches a student’s academic record against the curriculum requirements. It offers a user-friendly interface that helps students learn easily what courses they still need to take to fulfil the requirements of School, GE, major, minor, etc.. It also facilitates communication between students and Major Leaders / Academic Advisors.

Two report views are available under DegreeWorks: Advising Worksheet and Registration Checklist

Advising Worksheet is the default view when logging onto DegreeWorks from AIMS.  Degree requirements of the student will be presented in detail under different blocks in the worksheet.  The requirements will be shown on the left side; the courses that the student has studied or needs to study will be listed against the requirements on the right side.  If the Major Leader or Academic Advisor has written down advising notes for the student, the content will be displayed.

As the requirements for any major, minor, college/school requirements, etc may change over time, “catalog term” is used to differentiate the set of requirements that the student is following.  Normally, for the degree and Gateway Education requirements, the catalog term will be the same as the student’s admission term to the Bachelor’s degree programme.

The other report view, Registration Checklist, helps a student or the advisor find out quickly what courses and requirements that the student still needs to complete.  Registration Checklist differs from the Advising Worksheet in that it has the detailed curriculum requirements and advising features removed.  This view enables students to identify quickly the list of courses for future registration.

While DegreeWorks facilitates you on academic advising and degree audit, you are encouraged to review your advising worksheet at least a few times in each semester, particularly:

  • Before you discuss your study plan or course registration with your Major Leader or Academic Advisor;
  • After you have registered for courses and check to ensure if the courses are applicable to your degree requirements; and
  • After your grades are available.

8. Guidance on Whole Person and Career Development

Guidance provided by Student Development Services (SDS)

The mission of Student Development Services (SDS) is to enrich students’ educational experience and whole person development at City University.  This is achieved by creating a supportive and challenging learning environment, fostering an enriching campus life, and promoting whole person development as well as students’ welfare.  SDS is committed to nurturing the mind, body and spirit of students so that they can attain personal and professional excellence, cherish life-long learning and contribute to society.

SDS provides the following services:

  • Financial assistance and welfare
  • Leadership development
  • Personal development
  • Physical education and sports
  • Psychological counselling
  • Scholarships
  • Services for disabled students
  • Student and cultural activities
  • Student success advising service

Guidance provided by Career and Leadership Centre (CLC)

Career Education Programmes

Having the essential skills for a job is important.  Knowing the ways to present your skills is equally important.  As a student, are you confident that your talents can be fully discovered by employers?  The Career Education Programmes are designed to help you equip yourself with these skills so that you can demonstrate them to your prospective employers when you are applying for a job.

  • Career Talks

    Familiarize yourself with organisational structures, screening requirements, and career development opportunities of prospective employers at the career talks.  Check the online career calendar for career talks and workshop schedules.

  • Resume Clinic

    Improve your skills in writing resumes and self-introduction letters for job applications, volunteer positions, academic scholarships and awards in a professional way.

  • Interview Workshop & Practicum

    Acquire skills on how to present your strengths in an interview.  Your actions recorded during mock interviews can be reviewed and improved during the practicum sections.

  • Practical Workshops on Specific Occupations

    Learn and practise for the entry requirements of some of the more popular jobs such as those offered by the “Big Four” audit firms, AO/EO, and the Disciplinary Forces.

Employment Services

Getting a desirable job requires concerted efforts.  To do so, you need skills, knowledge, and of course the opportunities to reach the job.  You are welcome to make use of CLC’s services in searching for part-time and/or full-time jobs and internship opportunities.

  • Campus Work Scheme (CWS)

    The CWS job assignment allows students to learn the generic work skills and gain real life work experience.  It also enhances students’ understanding of the work environment and develops work ethics and positive work attitude needed in the workplace.

  • Campus Internship Scheme (CIS)

    The CIS job assignment is meant to be purposeful, challenging and of a professional nature.  Typically, the work helps students develop analytical, problem-solving, and interpersonal skills; and acquire the skills needed to engage in discovery and innovation.  The work has clearly-defined Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs) that are aligned with City University Graduate Outcomes.

  • Job Search Tools

    Make use of the job search facilities to view job vacancy information via JIJIS (Joint Universities website) or JobPlus (CityU website).

  • Training Workshops

    Train yourself to understand employer/employee expectations and prepare yourself ready for taking up the challenges at the workplace.

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VI. USEFUL CONTACTS (ON-CAMPUS)

On-campus Offices / Units Telephone
CityU
- 24-hour Emergency Phone
- General Enquiry
 
(852) 3442 8888
(852) 3442 7654
Academic Regulations and Records Office (ARRO) (852) 3442 2300
Admissions Office (ADMO) (852) 3442 9094
Career and Leadership Centre (CLC) (852) 3442 5591
Computing Services Centre (CSC) – Help Desk (852) 3442 7658
Global Services Office (GSO)
- External Liaison and Cooperation / Non-local Student Recruitment

- International and Non-local Students / Student Exchange Programme
 
(852) 3442 8009 /
(852) 3442 7373
(852) 3442 8089
Run Run Shaw Library – Circulation Counter (852) 3442 8316
Student Development Services (SDS) (852) 3442 8090
Student Residence Office (SRO) (852) 3442 1111
   
Bookshop – Commercial Press (HK) Ltd (852) 3442 2290
Hang Seng Bank (852) 2198 5825
Young Chung Yee Health Centre
- Medical
- Dental
 
(852) 3442 6066
(852) 3442 6052

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VII. USEFUL LINKS

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