Seminars

Harvesting, Storing and Utilising Solar Energy using Photoactive Semiconductors

Dr. Yun Hau NG

School of Chemical Engineering,
The University of New South Wales, Australia

Date: 23 October 2017 (Monday)
Time: 2:15 – 3:15 pm
Venue: B5307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Hydrogen generation from photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical water splitting under visible light has been considered as an effective way to make solar energy storable and transportable. As oxygen is the only by-product from splitting water, this reaction has great potential to simultaneously address the energy shortage and environmental issues by replacing fossil fuel. A great number of photoactive semiconductors (be it oxide, sulphide or etc) has attracted extensive attention due to its low-cost, mostly non-toxic, usually high stability, and with considerable theoretical photocurrent density for H2 generation. These characteristics meet favourably the requirements for water splitting. In contrast, the challenges in extending their capability in this application lie on several aspects, such as the extension of the solar spectrum absorption, the charges transportation, and the photo-stability of the materials. For example, TiO2 absorbs only UV wavelength, ZnO suffers from photocorrosion and many others experience significant charges recombination processes. Introduction of nanosctructures or secondary components into the parental semiconductor is a potential way in tackling the above mentioned issues. The main driving force for our research in the UNSW is to improve (if not overcome) the above shortfalls by using several different chemical synthetic approaches and device designs.

About the Speaker

Yun Hau Ng received his Ph.D. from Osaka University (Research Center for Solar Energy Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering Science) in 2009. After a brief research visit to Radiation Laboratory at University of Notre Dame (Prof. Prashant Kamat’s group), he joined the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials UNSW with the Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship (APD) in 2011. He is currently a senior lecturer with tenure in the School of Chemical Engineering at UNSW. His research is focused on the development of novel photoactive semiconducting particles for sunlight energy conversion and storage, including hydrogen generation from water, conversion of carbon dioxide to solar fuels, and solar battery. He received the Honda-Fujishima Prize in 2013 in recognition of his work in the area of photo-driven water splitting. He was also selected as Emerging Investigator by the RSC Journal of Material Chemistry in 2016. He has published over 95 peer-reviewed research articles and is currently serving as Editorial Board Member for NPG Scientific Reports.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Digital Rock Physics, Natural Energy Resources and Induced Earthquakes

Professor Teng-fong Wong

Founding Director
Earth System Science Programme
Faculty of Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Date: 25 October 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 5:30 p.m.
Venue: G5-314, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

In the physics of rock, there are two fundamental questions associated with the exploitation of hydrocarbon resources: What controls the percolation and flow of fluids in the porous rock formation? How does deformation evolve and localize to form structures that may enhance or inhibit the fluid flow? Extensive field observation and systematic laboratory investigation have documented the complexity of flow in porous media, and its interplay with strain localization. Percolation theory and bifurcation analysis have provided useful frameworks for the analysis of these phenomena. With advances in 3D imaging of the geometric complexity, digital rock physics can now be pursued to model these processes via voxel-based simulations.

Fluid flow and associated changes in pore pressure may induce earthquakes. In the past decade, a number of such induced earthquakes have been reported in association with the storage of fluid in the vicinity of active faults. A fundamental understanding of this phenomenon requires interdisciplinary efforts in seismology, geodesy and rock physics. We have an ongoing collaboration with China Earthquake Administration near one of China’s largest repositories of natural gas in Hutubi, Xinjiang, to monitor the earthquake activity and probe its connection with the extraction and withdrawal of gas. A synopsis of the project and preliminary results will be presented.

About the Speaker

Professor Teng-fong Wong is founding director of the Earth System Science Programme in the Faculty of Science, CUHK. After matriculation in Hong Kong, he went to the United States where he obtained undergraduate and graduate degrees from Brown, Harvard and MIT. Before returning to Hong Kong to assume his current position, Wong has taught for thirty years at Stony Brook University, where he served as Chair of the Department of Geosciences and associate dean of the Graduate School. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union, and recipient of the Louis Néel Medal of the European Geosciences Union in 2010.

Registration

The Colloquium is open to all. SEE students are required to register via AIMS in just a few steps: Go to AIMS, select “Student Services”, then select “Central Repository on Student Development Activities System” and search the activity name “SEE Colloquium: Digital Rock Physics, Natural Energy Resources and Induced Earth” or the activity code “E2-2017-0862”.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

High performance graphene oxide electromechanical actuators: piezoelectric and shape memory effects

Assoc. Professor Zhe Liu

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Australia
Faculty of Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Date: 30 October 2017 (Monday)
Time: 2:30 – 3:30 pm
Venue: B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The electromechanical properties of graphene and graphene-oxide (GO) have proven to be both unique and exciting. The feasibility of employing these materials as commercial micro/nano- electromechanical actuators is highlighted by their exceptional strain output (up to 28%), volumetric work capacities (as much as 29 times greater than common high modulus ferroelectrics), and fast response rate (up to GHz). This talk will provide an overview of our density functional theory (DFT) simulation studies of the piezoelectric and shape memory effects of GO in the past few years.

(1) Our DFT simulations predicted that some GO compounds had excellent piezoelectric strain output: 0.16% under an electrical field of 0.5V/A, which is comparable with some high performance of piezoelectric ceramics. We found that the rippling structure of GO plays a decisive role in its piezoelectric performance. With an atomically thin structure, GO can be a promising two-dimensional piezoelectric membrane in various MEMS/NEMS applications.

(2) Shape memory effect was observed for GO being subject to a vertical electrical field. We find that some of the GO crystal structures intrinsically have two stable phases/states. Applying an electric field perpendicular to the basal plane of the stable GO phase leads to a huge plastic in-plane contraction deformation of 15% as a result of a phase transformation from the stable to the metastable phase, whereas a mechanical force in parallel to the basal plane can revert the meta-stable GO to its original shape (the stable phase/state), completing a whole shape memory cycle.

The superior electromechanical properties of GO-based materials render them a unique position to address future demand on micro/nano- actuation materials. Our theoretical studies are essential to obtain in-depth physical knowledge of the electromechanical actuation behavior and, therefrom, how to best optimize its performance in the future.

About the Speaker

Zhe Liu is associate Professor of Computational Materials Engineering in Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Melbourne. He graduated from Engineering Mechanics Department at Tsinghua University, China, and got his PhD degree from Materials Science and Engineering Department at Northwestern University in US. After that, he spent two years as postdoc research fellow in National Renewable Energy Laboratory in US.

Liu group’s research aim is to use computation to aid the knowledge-based design for novel materials. Meeting the increasing energy demand of ever growing population requires novel materials and devices for energy efficiency, energy conversion, and energy storage applications, meanwhile mitigating or minimizing the undesirable impact on our environment. Beyond the traditional trial-and-error experimental method, computational design is a promising way to greatly accelerate the novel material discovery and device system design. In past ten years, Liu’s group develops and employs state-of-the-art computational methods for the designs of structural materials (metallic alloys) and energy related functional materials, such as semiconductor and oxide alloys, 2D energy conversion materials, and nanoporous materials for energy storage. His group has published 89 papers including ~20 on top journals like Science and Nature series, PRL, JACS, Adv. Mat., etc.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Resource recovery in an integrated urban water management framework

Professor Long Nghiem

Representative of the Engineering Cluster
Deputy Director of the GeoQuest Research Centre
University of Wollongong

Date: 15 November 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Venue: B5-309, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

New membrane processes including forward osmosis (FO) and membrane distillation (MD) provide an excellent platform to transform wastewater treatment facilities to biorefineries. Major advantages of FO and MD include operation at very low hydraulic pressures, high rejection of a broad range of contaminants, and lower propensity for membrane fouling than in pressure-driven membrane processes. Our research demonstrates that FO and MD can be used to directly extract clean water from raw sewage for reuse, while simultaneously concentrating wastewater to the level suitable for anaerobic treatment. Anaerobic treatment of wastewater, sludge, and organic waste can produce biogas, which can then be used by a combined heat and power engine to produce electricity and thermal energy. Membrane based techniques have been developed to recovery phosphorus as either struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) or hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) from the sludge centrate. Pathway for practical implementation of the research outcomes toward a ‘livable city model’ will also be briefly discussed.

About the Speaker

Professor Long Nghiem attended the University of New South Wales for his Bachelor Degree in Environmental Engineering, Yale University and the University of Wollongong for his PhD in Membrane Technology. In 2009, he was a visiting professor at Colorado School of Mines. In May and June 2016, he was an August-Wilhelm Scheer Visiting Professor at the Technical University of Munich. He is currently the leader of the Strategic Water Infrastructure Laboratory and Deputy Director of the GeoQuest Research Strength at the University of Wollongong. Over the last 5 years, as the lead Chief Investigator, he has secured over $2.4 Million in competitive research grants and over $0.7 Million in industry research funding. Prof Nghiem has supervised to completion 17 PhD and 7 Master students. To date, he has published over 230 journal articles. Prof Nghiem has an h-index of 44 with over 6,500 citations (according to Scopus). His current work focuses on the development of a technology platform for the recovery of energy and resources from wastewater and low carbon seawater desalination.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Indirect photochemical oxidation in aqueous aerosol particles

Prof. Dr. Markus Ammann

Head of Surface Chemistry Group
Paul Scherrer Institute,
Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry, Switzerland

Date: 23 November 2017 (Thursday)
Time: 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Venue: G5-132, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Aerosol aging refers to the multitude of physical and chemical transformation atmospheric particles undergo, which play an important role in the impact of aerosols on climate, air quality and health. Most aerosol types contain primary and secondary organic compounds that are chromophores, which on one hand are contributing to the optical properties of aerosols but which may on the other hand initiate indirect photochemical oxidation processes. Many of these are aromatic carbonyls forming excited triplet states, which are important oxidants in electron transfer or H abstraction reactions. An important characteristic of the triplet chemistry is that they on one hand lead to further formation of secondary organic matter and on the other hand form reduced ketyl radicals, which may transfer the excess electron to oxygen and thereby produce HO2 radicals and then reform the ground state chromophore again, which closes a photocatalytic cycle. Another type of chromophore is represented by iron carboxylate complexes, in which the initial oxidation is initiated by ligand to metal charge transfer, and the closure of the photocatalytic cycle is mediated by Fenton’s chemistry via the reaction of Fe(II) with H2O2. In this overview, some examples are discussed, where the role of different chromophores for the oxidation of oxygenated organic compounds and halide ions is demonstrated, by using a multitude of diagnostic tools with various observables, such as HO2 release to the gas phase, formation of OVOC species, mass loss and offline analysis of low-volatility products. Special emphasis is also given to the feedbacks between microphysical parameters (viscosity) and the oxidative chemistry by following the above mentioned observables over very long time scales and by using an X-ray microspectroscopy method to follow chemically induced spatial gradients within individual aerosol particles in a quasi-online manner.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Archive of Seminars

CAS-ESM and Applications to Simulate Extreme Weather Events

Professor Minghua ZHANG

(1) Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences
(2) School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, State University of New York at Stony Brook, USA

Date: 28 September 2017 (Thursday)
Time: 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Venue: B5-209, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

This presentation will start with an introduction of the Chinese Academy of Sciences Earth System Model (CAS-ESM). The model has the capability of two-way nesting with the mesoscale weather forecast model (WRF). It can be therefore used for high-resolution regional simulations of extreme weather and climate events while retaining upscale feedback with long lead time. Results will be presented on the simulation and analysis of a cyclogenesis event in the US Central Plain and a heavy precipitation event in the Beijing by using the model. Ongoing efforts to improve the model and its regional applications will be described.

About the Speaker

Minghua Zhang is Professor and "Thousand Plan" Scholar at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. He is on leave from the State University of New York at Stony Brook, where he had served as Director of the Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres, and Dean of the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences.

Minghua Zhang's research is about numerical modeling of climate and global climate change. He develops and improves atmospheric general circulation models on moist convection and clouds, and applies these models to understand past and future climate changes. He has published over one hundred articles in peer-reviewed journals. For his climate modeling research, he had served for ten years as co-Chair of the Atmospheric Model Working Group of the Community Earth System Model that is administered at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). He is currently the Lead Scientist overseeing and coordinating the development of the Chinese Academy of Sciences Earth System Model—CAS-ESM.

Minghua Zhang is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR)–Atmospheres of the American Geophysical Union (AGU).

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Colloquium: The Poles and Environmental Protection

Dr. Rebecca LEE Lok-sze, MH

Founder and Director
Polar Museum Foundation

Date: 20 September 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
* Light Refreshments will be served after the Colloquium
Venue: G5-314, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The Poles were the world's cleanest and flawless Iceland. However, due to environmental pollution and global warming, these paradises are changing rapidly. The collapsing and melting of ice shelves, pollution on icebergs, and massive changes in environmental and ecological systems are happening here. Global warming has caused the frequent occurrence of extreme climate variations, drought, floods, hurricanes, heat waves, tornadoes and other natural disasters. It also results in the rising of sea level, spreading of disease, extinction of species and other consequences. These phenomena represent consequences of our continual destruction of the environment. The Antarctic, Arctic and Tibetan Plateau are unique elements that are irreplaceable in the whole Earth system. The two poles are two cold sources of the Earth, and they directly control the change of global climate and environment through the atmospheric circulation. Therefore, environmental protection is imperative.

To cultivate environmental protection, the popularization of science and the artistic packaging of it are very important. The public should fully understand the purpose and significance of polar research, and recognize the critical contributions of scientists. Eventually, a bridge for communication with young people will be established.

We are all residents of the global village. For protecting the living environment, we must work together to popularize science education for the next generation.

About the Speaker

Dr. Rebecca Lee has transformed herself from a professional graphic designer, painter, photographer and writer to a polar researcher in the last 30 years. 

Pursuit of innovation has resulted in her being recognized as the first Hong Kong woman explorer to reach the Arctic, Antarctic and Mount Everest Region She was the author of more than fourteen books, organized numerous educational exhibitions and produced TV documentaries about the world we live in.

Her personal integrity is seen in her courage, resilience, and survival in extreme conditions and adversity. She has been to the Arctic ten times, Antarctica eight times and to Mount Everest region four times. Her work shows a true love for our planet and mankind.

Rebecca has delivered hundreds of lectures to primary and secondary school students, university undergraduates in Hong Kong, Macau and China about her work, adventure and latest scientific findings on the environment. They are inspired to take a more serious attitude towards life and to conserve and protect the environment.

The community has benefited tremendously from her public education efforts. She is contributing significantly to the goal of environmental protection.

Registration

The Colloquium is open for all.  All SEE students are required to register via AIMS in just a few steps.  Go to AIMS, select “Student Services”, then select “Central Repository on Student Development Activities System” and search the activity code: E2-2017-0818.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Colloquium: Food and Environment in the US and China in The Donald Trump and Xi Jinping Era

Prof. Robert GOTTLIEB

Professor of Urban & Environmental Policy, Emeritus Founder and former Director of the Urban & Environmental Policy Institute
Occidental College, Los Angeles

Mr. Simon NG

Independent Consultant in Environmental and Transport
Fellow and former Chief Research Officer at Civic Exchange

Date: 12 September 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Venue: B5-311, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The US and China are the two largest carbon emitters, the two largest users and manufacturers of pesticides, and the two largest energy consumers and producers, and have the two largest food systems in the world. With the election of Donald Trump in the US and consolidation of power of China President Xi Jinping, some see a role reversal in such areas as food and environmental policy. Is this true? The talk by Robert Gottlieb and Simon Ng will discuss what changes have taken place at the local, national, and global level, and what needs to happen to make their food and environmental systems greener, healthier and more just.

About the Speaker

Prof. Robert GOTTLIEB is Emeritus Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy, and founder and former Director of the Urban & Environmental Policy Institute at Occidental College, Los Angeles.

Mr. Simon NG is an environmental and transport consultant, and Fellow and former Chief Research Officer at Civic Exchange, a public policy think tank in Hong Kong.

Robert and Simon co-authored Global Cities: Urban Environments in Los Angeles, Hong Kong, and China, published by the MIT Press in May 2017.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

A wave-induced negative feedback between the stratified coastal ocean and tropical cyclones

Professor Ralf TOUMI

Head of Space and Atmospheric Physics, Department of Physics
Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ, UK

Date: 5 September 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Venue: B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Predicting tropical cyclone structure and evolution remains challenging. Particularly, the coastal surface wave interactions with tropical cyclones have received no attention. Through a series of state-of-the art high-resolution, fully-coupled ocean-wave and atmosphere-ocean-wave experiments, we show here for the first time that wave-induced mixing is the major driver of stratified coastal ocean ahead-of-cyclone-eye cooling, influencing the evolution of both the ocean and tropical cyclones. The presence of a continental shelf leads to a small enhancement of the wind-driven cooling ahead of the cyclone compared to deep water,. However, the wave-induced vertical mixing contribution to the cooling is significantly larger than that caused by  currents. In the fully-coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave mode, the maximum wind speed is weaker and the damaging footprint area of hurricane-force winds is reduced by up to 50% due to the strong cooling ahead. Including wave-induced dynamics is essential to improve tropical cyclone intensity predictions for the highly populated and vulnerable coasts.

About the Speaker

Prof. Ralf TOUMI was awarded his PhD from the University of Cambridge in on stratospheric ozone under the supervision of Prof. John Pyle, FRS. He was then appointed a temporary lecturer in the Chemistry Department in Cambridge and a Fellow in Physical Chemistry at Christ's College Cambridge. He moved to the Physics Department at Imperial College and joined the Space and Atmospheric Physics group as a Lecturer in 1994. He was promoted to Professor of Atmospheric Physics in 2005 and since 2014 is Head of the Space and Atmospheric Physics Group. He was awarded the Phillip Leverhulme Prize for "scholars of outstanding distinction" (2002), a Merit Award by Imperial College for outstanding achievement in research (2004), a Royal Society Industry Fellowship with BP (2006-2010) and a NERC Knowledge Exchange Fellowship (2009-2012), Co-chair of Adaptation Services in the Climate KIC (2013-2015). He advises BP Plc on how to adapt to the physical impacts of climate change. He is founding director of OASIS LMF Ltd which is promoting open access catastrophe modelling for the insurance sector and others. OASIS was also the basis of a 5 year Europe wide Climate KIC (Euro 4M)  project he led.  He has co-authored and reviewed many international reports such as WMO Ozone Assessments, SPARC and IPCC Reports. He has served on the ESA mission advisory group and the European Commission Climate Services Road Map group. He is a member of the extend science team of Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS). He has supervised 24 PhD students to completion and has published extensively covering a wide range of topics in climate science (130+ papers; 2700+ citations; H-Index=30).

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

Aerosol Science and Technology for Industrial Applications -Measurements, dynamic behaviors, and materials synthesis-

Prof. Kikuo OKUYAMA

Professor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Hiroshima University, Japan

Date: 14 August 2017 (Monday)
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Venue: B5-310, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Aerosols are defined as gaseous suspensions of fine solid or liquid particles. Commonly described as dust, fume, smoke, mist, smog, and haze, aerosols are naturally present in our environment and often seen as harmful substances, which affect our life quality. This triggered the development of aerosol measurements and particle collection techniques over the years. On the other hand, development of aerosol technology by taking its advantages could benefit the human being and our society. Aerosol technology can be applied in the industries through the integration with other fields. One of the important applications is the synthesis and functionalization of nanomaterials towards advanced devices.

In this lecture, my aerosol related research is firstly introduced by focusing on the aerosol measurement technology, such as charger, differential mobility analyzer and condensation nucleus counter. Then, applications of aerosol technology to the production of nanostructured fine particles for magnetic materials, energy conversion devices, and organic pollutant removal are also discussed.

About the Speaker

Prof. (emeritus) Kikuo Okuyama has been working in the field of aerosol science and technology for over 40 years. He received B.S. (1971) and M.S. (1973) in Chemical Engineering from Kanazawa University. He started to work at the University of Osaka Prefecture (1973) and received his Dr. Eng. in Chemical Engineering with the thesis entitled “Coagulation of Aerosols” in 1978. He visited the United States in 1979 and worked as a post-doctoral researcher in the University of Houston (1979–1980) and a visiting associate at California Institute of Technology (summer time, 1985-1991). Since 1990, he was a full-professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Hiroshima University until his retirement in 2013. After retirement, he became an emeritus professor at the same university. He has been co-authoring more than 500 scientific papers in SCI-indexed journals and producing more than 150 patents. Professor Okuyama has been engaged in a number of national projects concerning particles contamination during semiconductor processing, materials synthesis using aerosol routes, investigation of atmospheric aerosols, and magnetic nanomaterials. He has received numerous honors and awards, including the Fuchs Memorial Award in 2002.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Workshop on Exploring Sustainable Smart Cities: Opportunities and Challenges in Interdisciplinary Approaches

Date: 21 – 22 August 2017
Time: 9am – 6pm
Venue: P4703, 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Sustainable development and smart city are far more than a theoretical concept of balancing the economic, environmental, social, and technological dimensions of human development. In practice, it requires innovative solutions that ensure prosperity while protecting all people and the planet. As cities around the world are currently under fast transition towards a low carbon environment and resource efficient economy, there is a growing importance of exploring the opportunities and challenges in profiling the competitiveness and sustainability of cities. In this connection, the School of Energy and Environment is hosting a workshop on “Exploring Sustainable Smart Cities: Opportunities and Challenges in Interdisciplinary Approaches” on August 21st-22nd  at City university of Hong Kong. We hope to take this opportunity to bring together the knowledge and theories, and ultimately aim to scale up practical solutions and shape new policies for the development of sustainable smart cities.

The workshop will split into two sessions for each of the two days. In the morning session, the visiting fellow, Dominika P. Brodowicz, PhD. and Assistant Professor, Innovative City Department at Warsaw School of Economics will provide tutorial lectures on “Sustainable development of contemporary metropolises - green and smart solutions in Europe, Asia and North America”. In the afternoon session, renowned experts from academic, industrial, and governmental sectors will deliver talks by sharing their hands-on experience and exchanging ideas on sustainable development and smart city.

List of guest speakers:
Dr. Dominika Brodowicz, Assistant Professor, Innovative City Department, SGH Warsaw School of Economics  
Pr. Patrick T.I. Lam, Department of Building & Real Estate, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Dr. Kira Matus, Division of Environment and Sustainability, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Dr. Wanxin Li, Department of Public Policy, City University of Hong Kong  
Pr. Yuan Xu, Department of Geography and Resource Management, Chinese University of Hong Kong  
Dr. Kyung-Min Nam, Department of Urban Planning and Design, University of Hong Kong  
Dr. Eddy Lau, Head of Green Labelling, Hong Kong Green Building Council  
Dr. Lara Jaillon, Department of Architecture & Civil Engineering, City University of Hong Kong  
Mr. Simon Ng, Expert fellow, Civic Exchange  
Dr. Lin Zhang, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong  
Dr. Masaru Yarime, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong  
Dr. Ian Ridley, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong  
Dr. Aude Pommeret, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong  
Pr. Peter Brimblecombe, School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong  
Dr. Esther Hiu Kwan YUNG, Department of Building and Real Estate, Hong Kong Polytechnic University  

The workshop is open to public and will be fully sponsored by the School of Energy and Environment. All interested parties are welcome to join parts or all sessions of the workshop.

The organizing committee:
Dr. Aude Pommeret
Dr. Ian Ridley
Dr. Masaru Yarime
Dr. Lin Zhang

High-Temperature Electrolysis Using Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cells

Prof. CHAN Siew Hwa

Professor
School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and
Co-Director, Energy Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Date: 8 August 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Venue: G4-302, 4/F., Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Lately, the term “energy storage” has been represented by batteries almost exclusively. Batteries are considered as the “sole” solution for energy storage in renewable energy applications such as wind curtailment or grid support. In this talk, energy storage in gravimetric and volumetric capacities will be shared and the domain of applications will be discussed. To explore the use of green chemical energy, such as hydrogen or ammonia, as an energy storage media, high-temperature electrolysis appears to be the right technology for converting the renewable energy sources into the green chemical energy. The focus of this talk will be placed on electrolysis of seawater and co-electrolysis of flue gas discharged from the oxy-combustion power plant by using renewable energy. The latter can be seen as a means to bridge the gap between the fossil fuel and non-fossil fuel economies.

About the Speaker

Prof. Chan joined NTU as a Lecturer in 1991 after obtaining his PhD and subsequently working as a postdoctoral researcher at Imperial College London. He is now a Professor in the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Prof. Chan is a Director of Maz Energy Pte Ltd, where he provides technical advices to the Board since 2004. He is a member of the Management Board of Energy Studies Institute (SGP); Advisor to Total SA, Horizon Fuel Cell Technologies and Wuhan Koleal (China). He was appointed by Ministry of Education (China) as an International Member of External Review Panel for the Institutional Quality Audit to South China University of Technology. Prof. Chan’s research is inclined Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Technology. His research has gained him a number of recognitions, which include George-Stephenson Award from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (UK), “World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds 2014” from Thomson-Reuters, Nanyang Award (Research Excellence), Nanyang Award (Teaching Excellence), etc. Prof. Chan has published more than 240 refereed journal papers with total citations of ~9000 and h-index of 50 (WOS). He is the editorial board member of “Fuel Cells – from fundamentals to systems”, “Journal of Power Technologies” and “Energy Conversion and Management”. He is very active in commercializing technologies developed at his laboratories.

Registration: Please sign up here.

Enquiry: Please contact Miss Winnie Lo via e-mail: puiyanlo2@cityu.edu.hk or Tel.: 3442 9693.

~All are Welcome~

 

Understanding the Anomalously High Capacity of Electrode Materials for Li-ion Batteries

Prof. Won Sub YOON

Professor
Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Korea

Date: 7 August 2017 (Monday)
Time: 3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Venue: B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Recently, various novel mesoporous metal oxides have been widely investigated as electrode materials for LIBs. These studies have opened up a possibility for the development of anode materials with significantly improved Li-storage performance. Synthesized ordered mesoporous SnO2 showed a reversible capacity of about 1000 mAhg-1, which is higher than the predicted value based on the alloying reaction mechanism of Sn, formed from conversion reaction of SnO2 with Li. Additionally, we have found that the mesoporous MoO2 anode presented here gives a high Li-storage capacity (1,814 mAhg-1 at first cycle and 1,607mAhg-1 after 50 cycles) as well, which is much higher than its theoretical capacity based on the conversion reaction of MoO2 with Li (838mAhg-1). As aforementioned, several research groups have newly proposed Li-storage mechanisms; however, this extra Li-storage mechanism of transition metal oxide is still unclear, suggesting that the high capacity of the mesoporous MoO2 in the present work probably results from a different Li-storage mechanism than those previously reported.

The results from mesoporous SnO2 and MoO2 anode materials further provide a more complete understanding of possible Li-storage mechanisms for transition metal oxides, and thus make possible the further advancement of ultrahigh capacity anode materials for Li rechargeable batteries. More detailed discussion will be presented at the time of meeting.

About the Speaker

Won-Sub Yoon is a professor in the Department of Energy Science at Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU). He received his Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from Yonsei University, Korea. He worked at Brookhaven National Laboratory in USA as a principal investigator and Kookmin University in Korea as a professor. His research group is specialized in studying electrode materials and the structural properties for energy conversion and storage systems including rechargeable batteries, fuel cells, and supercapacitors. Most of his publications (more than 120 papers) have been focused on developing and applying in situ synchrotron-based X-ray techniques to investigate electrode materials and the reaction mechanisms for rechargeable battery systems attacking current issues in rechargeable battery R&D. He has extensive experience with in situ synchrotron X-ray research. Especially, he has pioneered in the application of in situ time-resolved XRD, in situ temperature dependent XRD, in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and in situ SAXS studying on the structural and electronic changes of ion storage materials during real time operation.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Date: 21 July 2017 (Friday)
Time: 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Venue: B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Tailored Solid Acid and Base Catalysts for Bio-Derived Fuels and Chemicals

Prof. Karen Wilson

Research Director
European Bioenergy Research Institute, Aston University

Abstract

Concerns over the economics of proven fossil fuel reserves, in concert with government and public acceptance of the anthropogenic origin of rising CO2 emissions and associated climate change from such combustible carbon, is driving academic and commercial research into new sustainable routes to fuel and chemicals. Catalysis has a rich history of facilitating energy efficient, selective molecular transformations, and in a post-petroleum era will play a pivotal role in overcoming the scientific and engineering barriers to economically viable, and sustainable, biofuels and chemicals derived from renewable resources. [1] The production of advanced biofuels, derived from biomass sourced from inedible crop components, e.g. agricultural or forestry waste, or non-food crops such as Jatropha Curcas or microalgae, necessitate new solid (heterogeneous) catalysts and processes to transform these polar and often viscous feedstocks. Here we discuss catalytic solutions for clean synthesis of sustainable biodiesel [2], the most readily implemented and low cost, alternative source of transportation fuels, and key challenges in the design and application of catalytic technologies for the upgrading of pyrolysis bio-oils [3] via liquid phase transformations over solid acids and bases in batch and flow processes [4]. Advances in the rational design of nanoporous solid acid and base catalysts, possessing hierarchical architectures (Figure 1) or tailored surface functionality, can deliver superior performance in the energy-efficient esterification and transesterification of bio-oil components into biodiesel [5], and conversion of cellulosic components into key platform chemicals [6].


Fig. 1. Hierarchical nanoporous catalysts for efficient biodiesel production from bulky bio-oils.

[1] G.W. Huber, A. Corma, Angew. Chem. Int.-Ed. 2007, 46, 7184.
[2] K. Wilson, A.F. Lee, Cat. Sci. Tech. 2012, 2, 884; A.F. Lee, J.A. Bennett, J.C. Manayil, K. Wilson, Chem. Soc. Rev. 2014,43, 7887.
[3] L. Ciddor, J.A. Bennett, J.A. Hunns, K. Wilson, A.F. Lee, J. Chem. Tech. Biotech. 2015, 90, 780.
[4] V. C. Eze, A. N. Phan, C. Pirez, A. P. Harvey, A. F. Lee, K. Wilson, Catal. Sci. Technol. 2013, 3, 2373.
[5] J. Dhainaut, J.-P. Dacquin, A. F. Lee, K. Wilson, Green Chem. 2010, 12, 296; J. J. Woodford, J.-P. Dacquin, K. Wilson, A.F. Lee, Energy Environ. Sci. 2012, 5, 6145
[6] A. Osatiashtiani, A.F. Lee, M. Granollers, D.R. Brown, L. Olivi, G. Morales, J.A. Melero, K. Wilson, ACS Catal 2015, 5, 4345.

Nanoengineered Catalysts for Sustainable Chemistry

Prof. Adam Lee

EPSRC Leadership Fellow
European Bioenergy Research Institute, Aston University

Abstract

The quest for sustainable technologies to meet the food, energy and material challenges of this century is a key driver for the design of next-generation catalysts and industrial chemical processes. Control over the rate and pathway of associated chemical transformations represents the Holy Grail for catalysis, [1] however while chemoselective oxidations and hydrogenations of alcohols and carbonyls respectively are cornerstones of traditional organic synthesis, catalysts for such applications have eluded rational design. Here we highlight how advances in inorganic synthesis, underpinned by nanoscale materials visualisation and molecular level insight into dynamic surface chemistry through in-situ time-resolved spectroscopies, [2] are unlocking new high performance catalysts. This approach is illustrated for noble metal catalysed cascade oxidations (Fig. 1), [3] and the chemoselective hydrogenation of allylic aldehydes, [4] which both deliver high value chemicals for the polymer, fragrance and flavourings sectors.


Fig. 1. (a) Spatially orthogonal functionalization of hierarchical pore network by Pd and Pd nanoparticles affords precise control over reaction sequence in the one-pot catalytic cascade oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol→cinnamaldehyde→cinnamic acid. (b) Cinnamyl alcohol consumption (blue), and cinnamaldehyde (yellow) and cinnamic acid (green) production over a spatially orthogonal, hierarchical Pd macroporous-Pt mesoporous SBA-15 catalyst significantly outperforms conventional bimetallic and monometallic SBA-15 analogues.

[1] X. Zhang, K. Wilson, A.F. Lee, Chem. Rev. 2016, 116, 12328.
[2] A.F. Lee, C.V. Ellis, J.N. Naughton, M.A. Newton, C.M.A. Parlett, K. Wilson, JACS 2011, 133, 5724.
[3] C.M.A. Parlett, M.A. Isaacs, S.K. Beaumont, L.M. Bingham, N.S. Hondow, K. Wilson, A.F. Lee, Nature Mater. 2016, 15, 178.
[4] X. Zhang, L.J. Durndell, M.A. Isaacs, C.M.A. Parlett, A.F. Lee, K. Wilson, ACS Catal. 2016, 6, 7409.

About the Speaker

Prof. Karen WilsonisProf. Karen Wilson is Chair of Catalysis and Research Director of the European Bioenergy Research Institute at Aston University, where she also held a Royal Society Industry Fellowship in collaboration with Johnson Matthey. Karen has a BA from the University of Cambridge (1992), an MSc in heterogeneous catalysis from the University of Liverpool (1993) and a PhD (1996) in heterogeneous catalysis and surface science from the University of Cambridge. Karen was appointed to her first independent academic position at York in 1999 where she stayed until 2009 when she was appointed to a Readership in Physical Chemistry at Cardiff University. Karen’s research interests lie in the design the design of tuneable porous materials for sustainable biofuels and chemicals production from renewable resources. She has published >180 peer-reviewed articles (h-index 45).

Web Page: http://www.aston.ac.uk/eas/staff/a-z/professor-karen-wilson/
Email: k.wilson@aston.ac.uk

Prof. Adam LeeProf. Adam Lee is Professor of Sustainable Chemistry and an EPSRC Leadership Fellow in the European Bioenergy Research Institute, Aston University. He holds a BA and PhD from the University of Cambridge, and has held Chair appointments at Cardiff, Warwick and Monash universities. His research addresses the rational design of nanoengineered materials for clean catalytic technologies, and the development of in-situ methods providing molecular insight into surface reactions, for which he was awarded the 2012 Beilby Medal and Prize of the Royal Society of Chemistry. He has published >180 peer-reviewed articles (h-index 44).

Web Page: http://www.aston.ac.uk/eas/staff/a-z/professor-adam-lee/
Email: a.f.lee@aston.ac.uk; Twitter: @ ProfAdamFLee

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Towards Immensely Smart Sustainable Cities: From Self-driving Cars to Self-aware Buildings and Self-optimizing Grids

Dr. Sid Chi Kin CHAU

Assistant Professor
Masdar Institute in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE)

Date: 12 July 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Venue: Room Y5-204, 5/F., Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The paradigm of “smart cities” is transforming our society by merging extensive computing and information technology with urban infrastructure, services, facilities, and resource management. However, most smart city projects focus on collection and dissemination of data. The potential of smart cities has been not fully realized for improving sustainability. In this talk, a vision towards immensely smart sustainable cities with a high degree of automation and computational intelligence is outlined, which features self-driving vehicles that can automate transportation without human assistance, self-aware buildings that can intelligently acquire dynamic knowledge of buildings for automated control, and self-optimizing grids that can optimize energy management in the presence of uncertain energy demands and supplies. This talk presents my recent research work for enabling immensely smart sustainable cities.

About the Speaker

Sid Chi-Kin Chau is an assistant professor with the Masdar Institute in Abu Dhabi, UAE, which was established in collaboration with MIT. His primary research area is sustainable smart city systems and applications - by applying computing algorithms, intelligent systems and data analytics to develop sustainable solutions for smart cities, including smart grid, smart buildings, intelligent vehicles and transportation. He also researches in broad areas of cyber-physical systems and Internet-of-things. Previously, he was a visiting professor with MIT, and a senior research fellow with A*STAR in Singapore. He received the Ph.D. from University of Cambridge and B.Eng. from the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He has been on the program committees of top conferences in smart energy systems, such as ACM e-Energy, ACM BuildSys and IEEE SmartGridComm. He is a TPC co-chair of ACM e-Energy 2018. Further information about his research can be found at http://www.SmartSustainability.org/

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Sustainable and Resilient Design of Emerging Technologies and Urban Infrastructures

Dr. Shauhrat S. Chopra

Postdoctoral Researcher
Institute for Environmental Science and Policy
University of Illinois at Chicago

Date: 10 July 2017 (Monday)
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Venue: Room B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Cascading impacts of disruptive events including natural disasters like 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, infrastructure failures like the 2001 U.S. North-east Blackout, and epidemics like the H1N1 influenza are indicative of inherent vulnerability of our complex, highly interconnectedsociety. This vulnerability is further exacerbated by the threats of climate change and theuncertainty of their magnitude. Therefore, it is important to investigate the sources ofvulnerabilities and their mechanisms of propagation in order to prepare urban infrastructure for aresilient response. This presentation will discuss the integration of resilience thinking intomathematical models for sustainability assessment that can be viewed as a tool to informresearch, investment, and policy decisions. Unlike traditional approaches which predominantlyfocus on reducing environmental risks, the resilience-based approaches are better suited forunderstanding the tradeoffs between impacts and benefits in order to avoid unintendedconsequences of design decisions. I will describe applications and give examples of such toolsfor prospective assessment of sustainability and resilience of the built environment. In particular,I will explain how resilience thinking is applicable to both the design of urban criticalinfrastructure systems and the sustainable design of emerging technologies such as nano-enabledproducts whose potential environmental and health impacts are still unknown.

About the Speaker

Dr. Shauhrat S. Chopra obtained his Integrated Masters of Science in Systems Biology from the University of Hyderabad, India in 2011. He received his PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh, USA, in 2015. His doctoral dissertation was focused on resilience of complex systems including economic, industrial symbiosis, and critical infrastructure systems at national and regional levels. Currently, Shauhrat works as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Institute for Environmental Science and Policy, the University of Illinois at Chicago, on the U.S. EPA funded LCnano project focused on sustainable design of future transformative nano-enabled products. His data driven research is focused on designing indicators for sustainability and resilience of the built environment in support of environmental decision-making.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Watching Reactions Take Place at the Atomic Scale (and Learning From Them)

Dr. Neeraj SHARMA

Senior Lecturer & ARC DECRA Fellow
School of Chemistry
The University of New South Wales, Australia

Date: 28 June 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 04:30 p.m. – 05:30 p.m.
Venue: B5-309, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The majority of the research undertaken in my group focuses on making better batteries to meet the demands of emerging applications. A large proportion of the function of batteries arises from the electrodes, and these are in turn mediated by the atomic-scale perturbations or changes in the crystal structure during an electrochemical process (e.g. battery use). Therefore, a method to both understand battery function and improve their performance is to probe the crystal structure evolution in operando, i.e., while an electrochemical process is occurring inside a battery.

So, in my group we use in operando neutron powder diffraction, with its sensitivity towards lithium, to literally track the evolution of lithium in electrode materials used in rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. In addition, the ability to test smaller samples (e.g. in coin cells) with in operando X-ray powder diffraction has allowed us to probe other battery types, such as primary lithium and ambient temperature rechargeable sodium-ion batteries, and other configurations, such as thin film devices. With the information from these experiments we have directly related electrochemical properties such as capacity, battery lifetime and differences in charge/discharge to the content and distribution of lithium or sodium in the electrode crystal structures.

We are expanding our footprint in both the analytical techniques we use and the reactions we explore. Recent work has been directed towards realizing in operando neutron imaging, in operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy and in situ solid-state NMR allowing us to probe non-crystalline components in devices. We are also investigating formation reactions, i.e., literally watching synthesis of crystalline materials, and tracking the distribution of electrolytes during processes. The combination of these techniques and reactions provides more insight into the mechanism of device operation and the interactions at play.

Finally, materials discovery plays a large part in our synthetic work. We have two new research dimensions underway, the electrochemical tuning of the negative thermal expansion materials to obtain zero thermal expansion materials and the scaffolding of layer-structured electrode materials to increase electrochemical performance in rechargeable batteries.

This talk will provide a flavor of the work being undertaken in my group, emphasizing the highlights and our future directions.

About the Speaker

Neeraj completed his Ph.D. at The University of Sydney then moved to the Bragg Institute at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) for a post-doc. He is currently a senior lecturer at UNSW, holding an Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Award (DECRA) transitioning in 2016 from an Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) Research Fellowship. Neeraj has been the Royal Australian Chemical Institute (RACI) Nyholm Youth Lecturer (2013/2014), won the NSW Young Tall Poppy Award and the UNSW Excellence Award for Early Career Research in 2014. Neeraj has over 90 publications and has been invited to present his work at over 20 conferences. Neeraj’s research interests are based on solid state chemistry, designing new materials and investigating their structure-property relationships. He loves to undertake in situ or operando experiments of materials inside full devices, especially batteries, in order to elucidate the structural subtleties that lead to superior performance parameters. Neeraj’s projects are typically highly collaborative working with colleagues from all over the world with a range of skillsets. Neeraj also enjoys science communication and has been actively involved in projects such as www.crystalsinthecity.com.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Technologies to Understand the Role of Complexity in Atmospheric Aerosol

Dr. David Topping

Senior Lecturer
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
The University of Manchester

Date: 28 June 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 02:00 p.m. – 03:00 p.m.
Venue: B5-307, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Aerosol particles are ubiquitous components of the earth's atmosphere. They affect the earth's radiative balance through scattering and absorption of radiation, and are also widely acknowledged as key determinants of air quality. Comprised of both inorganic and organic compounds, the latter could potentially comprise millions of compounds. Over many years the global research community have developed modelling and measurement capabilities designed to better understand their evolution and impacts. With these, we continue to hypothesise and identify new processes and molecular species deemed important. This, however, presents challenges that require novel technological developments. Atmospheric science is reaching a crossroad of exploration. Attempts to address climatic and health impacts implies improving the knowledge on aerosol composition and properties yet, sooner or later, we must take decisions on what to do with the complexity of both. Presently, I feel we do not have appropriate technologies or model development ethos to answer this. In this talk, I will present developments in a range of areas that attempt to address this challenge in a holistic way.

About the Speaker

Dr David Topping obtained BSc in Physics and PhD from the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) in 2001 and in 2005 respectively. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences in the University of Manchester. His research interests focus on building computational models of atmospheric aerosol particles for use in interpretation of measured properties and as sub models for incorporation into climate change models. This broad classification masks a hierarchy of models and techniques with greatly varying complexity and range of applicability.  In addition, the research area is highly multi-disciplinary, covering: Physics, Chemistry, Numerical methods and Computational Science.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Colloquium: Smart City and Smart Industry: A HKPC perspective

Dr. Lawrence Chi-chong CHEUNG

Director, Technology Development
The Hong Kong Productivity Council (HKPC)

Date: 21 June 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 5:30 p.m.
Venue: G4302, 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

HKPC has been serving the Hong Kong Industry for 50 years with a wide range of services ranging from environment, manufacturing technology as well as automotive technology.   With the latest trend in Smart “everything”, HKPC has grouped its services into 2 key themes: Smart Industry and Smart City.  In this way, industry and potential partners alike can easily note the type of services that HKPC is offering.   In this seminar, Dr Cheung will give an overview of the Smart City and Smart Industry technology trends as well as some successful R&D outcome with a view of illustrating what HKPC has been doing and how some services are offered in partnership with other R&D institutions and universities.

About the Speaker

Dr. Lawrence Cheung has over 25 years of experience in research and development, consultancy and business. He manages a broad business portfolio on technological research and development as well as consultancy services in automotive, smart electronics, robotics and automation, medical devices, environmental management, smart materials and manufacturing technology and testing services etc.

He is currently the Vice Chairman of Hong Kong Wireless Technology Industry Association; Honorary Advisor of the Hong Kong Electronics and Technologies Association; an executive committee member of the Hong Kong Electronic Industries Association; an executive committee member of the Hong Kong Modern Enterprise Integration and Innovation Association; Member of Radio Spectrum and Technical Standards Advisory Committee (SSAC) of HKSAR Government Office of Communications Authority; Member of VTC Electronics and Telecommunications Training Board and Committee of Technologies Training of Vocational Training Council.

Prior to joining HKPC, Dr. Cheung was living in Australia holding a senior research post in Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) of Australia. He obtained Bachelor of Engineering with honours and Bachelor of Science degrees from Monash University in Australia. His doctorate degree was also from Monash University.  Dr. Cheung joined HKPC in 1996.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

New and Growing Threats to the Ozone Layer

Prof. Claire REEVES

Professor of Atmospheric Science
School of Environmental Sciences
University of East Anglia

Date: 14 June 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 09:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Venue: B5-416, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Ozone-depleting substances emitted through human activities (e.g. chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and their intermediate replacements the hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs)) cause large-scale damage to the stratospheric ozone layer, and influence global climate. Consequently, the production of many of these substances has been phased out through the Montreal Protocol. However, we have identified new threats to the ozone layer: 1) previously undetected CFCs; 2) concentrations of some CFCs and HCFCs that are continuing to increase and 3) rapidly increasing concentrations of very short lived substances (VSLS) which, owing to their relatively short atmospheric lifetimes (less than 6 months), are not regulated under the Montreal Protocol. Measurements in East and South East Asia suggest sources of these compounds in this region and the significance of this for the VSLS is that, despite their short lifetimes, they can be transported to the stratosphere through deep tropical convection.

About the Speaker

Professor Claire REEVES is an atmospheric scientist and her main interests are in tropospheric ozone chemistry and in halogenated gases that are stratospheric ozone depleting and greenhouse gases. She came to UEA as a student in 1983 and loved it so much that she never left. Initially she studied for a BSc in Environmental Sciences before obtaining a PhD in Atmospheric Science. She was then employed as a researcher for 15 years on various projects and, for a couple of years, supported by the National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCAS). In 2005 she began a RCUK Academic Fellowship, becoming a Reader in 2010 and subsequently a Professor in 2014. She teaches atmospheric chemistry and is currently the Deputy Head of the School of Environmental Sciences.

By training, she is a theoretical modeller, but her research activities focus on the interpretation of field data. This has included data from the Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory on the North Norfolk coast and other sites in the UK, Ireland, Australia and Malaysia. She has been involved in many campaigns using the Met. Office C-130 aircraft and the Facility for Atmospheric Airborne Research (FAAM) BAE-146 aircraft, including major international collaborative experiments flying over the Atlantic (ICARTT) and West Africa (AMMA). She has also investigated long term trends of trace gases derived from analysing samples from an archive of air collected in Tasmania, Australia, and from air trapped in firn (unconsolidated snow).

Her research on tropospheric ozone has focused on the processes that control its temporal and spatial trends, in particular the roles of long range transport and biogenic emissions, along with the chemistry of peroxy radicals, peroxides and alkyl nitrates. Her work on halogenated gases has largely involved modelling the atmospheric budgets of these gases using measurements of their atmospheric concentrations as constraints. She has been a co-author of the UNEP/WMO Scientific Assessments of Ozone Depletion that are used by the Parties to the Montreal Protocol to amend their controls on ozone depleting substances.

She is on the NCAS Executive Committee and is a core member of the NERC Peer Review College.