Seminars

Moist-convective rotating shallow water: a low-cost tool for understanding the influence of diabatic effects upon dynamics

Prof. Vladimir ZEITLIN

Professor
Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique
Université Pierre et Marie Curie/Ecole Normale Superieure

Date: 28 November 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon
Venue: G4701, 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

I will show how to introduce convective fluxes in a self-consistent way in rotating shallow models which follow from vertical averaging of the primitive equations in pressure coordinates. I  will demonstrate that the model reproduces, at low cost, the characteristic features of moist baroclinic instability, moist instabilities of hurricane-like vortices and salient features of their life-cycle, and also the observed structure of Mars' polar vortex, taking into account the gas-solid phase  transition of CO2.

About the Speaker

Professor Vladimir ZEITLIN obtained his PhD in theoretical and mathematical physics in 1980 from the Physical Institute (Moscow). Subsequently he moved his focus to geophysical fluid dynamics in the early 1980s. He worked at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (Moscow) on vortex dynamics, wave-vortex interactions and turbulence.  After moving to France, he joined the Laboratory of Dynamical Meteorology and is currently Professor at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie and École Normale Supérieure (Paris) and Vice-President of the Meteorology, Oceanography and Environmental Physics section of the French National University Council.  He has written two books, including the textbook, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics: Understanding (almost) everything with rotating shallow water models, which is forthcoming from Oxford University Press.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414(Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Weather and Climate Risks

Dr. Habil. Christian Franzke

Head of Weather and Climate Risks Theme,
Meteorological Institute,
Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability (CEN),
University of Hamburg

Date: 28 November 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 2:15 – 3:15 pm
Venue: B5-211, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Weather and climate extremes cause huge economic damages and harm many lives each year. There is evidence that some types of weather and climate extremes, like heat waves and flooding, have already increased or intensified over the last few decades, and climate projections reveal a further intensification for many types of weather and climate extremes in many regions though the uncertainties still remain large. While there is evidence for increases in economic losses it is uncertain whether this is due to an increase in the number and intensity of extreme events or can be attributed to socio-economic changes. In my presentation I will provide some ideas how to better understand and model such extreme events and their impacts in a changing climate.

About the Speaker

Christian Franzke studied Meteorology at the University of Karlsruhe (Vordiplom (BSc): 1992-1995) and the University of Hamburg (Diplom (MSc): 1995-1998). At the University of Hamburg he also completed his PhD (1999-2001) in the Theoretical Meteorology group. After that he held PostDoc positions at the Pennsylvania State University (2001-2002), the Courant Institute of Mathematical Science at New York University (2003-2006) and the National Center for Atmospheric Science (NCAR: 2006-2007). He then was a Senior Scientific Officer at BAS in Cambridge, UK from 2006-2013. Since 2013 he is back in the Theoretical Meteorology group at the University of Hamburg where he is the head of the Weather and Climate Risks theme and PI of the TRR181 project "Energy transfers in Atmosphere and Ocean". He has wide ranging research interests in climate dynamics, climate change, extreme events, weather and climate risks, renewable energy and socio-economic modeling. He is the author of the book Nonlinear and Stochastic Climate Dynamics.

 

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 or 3442 2412(Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Colloquium: Airborne Particulate Matter Pollution in Urban China: A Chemical Mixture Perspective from Sources to Impacts

Professor Xiangdong LI

Chair Professor of Environmental Science and Technology
Associate Dean (Research)
Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering
Faculty of Construction and Environment
The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Date: 29 November 2017 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 5:30 p.m.
Venue: B5-309, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Rapid urban and industrial development has resulted in severe air pollution problems in developing countries such as China, especially in highly industrialized and populous urban clusters. Dissecting the complex mixtures of airborne particulate matter (PM) has been a key scientific focus in the last two decades, leading to significant advances in understanding physicochemical compositions for comprehensive source apportionment. However, identifying causative components with an attributable link to population-based health outcomes remains a huge challenge. The microbiome, an integral dimension of the PM mixture, is an unexplored frontier in terms of identities and functions in atmospheric processes and human health. In this review, we identify the major gaps in addressing these issues, and recommend a holistic framework for evaluating the sources, processes, and impacts of atmospheric PM pollution. Such an approach and the knowledge generated will facilitate the formulation of regulatory measures to control PM pollution in China and elsewhere.

About the Speaker

Professor Xiang-dong Li is Chair Professor of Environmental Science and Technology at Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Associate Dean (Research) of Faculty of Construction and Environment, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. He obtained his BSc in Earth Sciences and his MSc in Geochemistry from Nanjing University, and his PhD in Environmental Technology from Imperial College London.

Professor Li’s major research interests include regional environmental pollution, urban environmental studies, and phytoremediation of contaminated soils. He has published more than 180 papers in leading international journals, and is one of the highly cited researchers in Environment/Ecology of the Web of Science database (Researcher ID B-2011-2008).

Professor Li is the past president (2011-2013) of the International Society of Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH). He is currently an Associate Editor for Environmental Science and Technology (ES&T). Professor Li is also an associate editor and editorial board member for several other international journals in related research fields.

Registration

.The Colloquium is open to all. SEE students are required to register via AIMS in just a few steps: Go to AIMS, select “Student Services”, then select “Central Repository on Student Development Activities System” and search the activity name “SEE Colloquium: Airborne Particulate Matter Pollution in Urban China” or the activity code “E2-2017-0883”.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

SOA formation and East Asian Carbonaceous Aerosols measurements

Dr Wenzheng Fang

Researcher
Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University

Date: 30 November 2017 (Thursday)
Time: 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 nn
Venue: B5-122, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

For SOA, the formation mechanisms have not fully understood and SOA contains a large number of difficult-to-measure compounds from diverse chemical classes. Combined online tunable photo-ionization aerosol mass spectrometry and theoretical calculations, the molecular-level of SOA formation from photo-oxidation (or ozonolysis) of important VOCs (e.g. Isoprene, Monoterpenes, Toluene) had been investigated. Online analysis of SOA products served as direct evidence for SOA formation from VOCs oxidation, and provided insights into SOA formation pathways.

For East Asian aerosols, the poorly constrained emissions sources and uncertain mechanisms for atmospheric transformations, hindered accurate modelling of effects and development of science-based mitigation. We use dual carbon isotope signatures (Δ14C and δ13C) to constrain sources and processing effects for all the major pools of carbonaceous aerosols: black carbon (BC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC) in E. Asia. For a winter haze study, our results show large fossil contributions (>50%) to all carbonaceous aerosol pools in E. Asia, with dramatically different coal contributions to BC in north China and receptor site Korean Climate Observatory at Gosan (>50%) compared to Shanghai (22%). Our large-scale measurements also indicate strong light absorbing property of WSOC and establish a source seasonality of BC over E. Asia. These findings facilitate an improved estimate of aerosol-induced climate, and a scientific underpinning for developing a regionally-tailored mitigation strategy in East Asia.

About the Speaker

Dr. Wenzheng Fang has worked on aerosol and atmospheric chemistry for about 10 years. In 2012, he earned his PhD at University of Science and Technology of China, where he successfully developed an online tunable photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer to study SOA formation from photo-oxidation of VOCs. After PhD, Dr. Fang moved to study biogenic VOCs emissions and sinks with Prof. Alex Guenther and Prof. Jim Smith in NCAR, using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer and chemical ionization mass spectrometer. Later, he served as an associate researcher at Institute of Urban Environment/Chinese Academy of Sciences. Since May 2015, he joined the Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Bolin Center for Climate Research at Stockholm University as a researcher/EU Marie Curie individual fellow and guest researcher, where he focused on source diagnostic and optical properties of black carbon, organic carbon and water soluble as well as water-insoluble organic carbon aerosol in East Asia.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR CO2 CAPTURE: AN OVERVIEW

Prof. Paul A. WEBLEY

The Peter Cook Centre for Carbon Capture and Storage,
The Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering,
The University of Melbourne, Australia

Date: 12 December 2017 (Tuesday)
Time: 2:30-3:30pm
Venue: G5-314, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Adsorption processes for CO2 capture have gained significant attention in the last decade with hundreds of reports on new adsorbents and processes for capture and removal of carbon dioxide from a range of gas streams.  To date, the only commercial examples are removal of trace carbon dioxide in gas streams such as LNG and ASU upstream molecular sieve units. There are no commercial examples of the use of adsorbents to capture carbon dioxide by adsorption processes and deliver a stream of high purity carbon dioxide for sequestration or further processing.  In this study, we present the range of processing options available for CO2 capture using adsorbents and show how these processes must be adapted to the condition of the feed stream. We also show how these processes make requirements of the adsorbents (or adsorbent systems) and highlight what features new adsorbent should have to help advance adsorption technology.  Specific examples of near commercial adsorption processes will be discussed, e.g. vacuum swing adsorption, high temperature dry regenerable fluidized bed systems, and rapid temperature swing systems.

About the Speaker

Paul Webley is Head of Department of Chemical Engineering and Director of the Clean Energy Laboratory at The University of Melbourne.  He is former manager of the Carbon Capture Program for the CO2CRC and Director of the Peter Cook Centre for Carbon Capture and Storage at The University of Melbourne. Paul has worked in development and implementation of carbon capture technologies for the past 15 years in industry and academia. His principal research interest is clean energy technologies particularly gas separation, energy storage, and applications of thermodynamics to improve process efficiency.  He is the author of more than 200 papers in scientific journals and books, 15 patents, and more than 100 contributions to international and national conferences.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 or 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

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