Seminars

Abundant and Cheap Carbon for Driving Industrial Biotech Innovation

Professor Vijay Singh

Professor, Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Director, Integrated Bioprocessing Research Laboratory
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Date: 5 March 2018 (Monday)
Time: 09:30 – 10:30
Venue: B5-209, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Protection of climate and anticipative shift from fossil based to renewable feedstock are driving bioeconomy in the US and around the world.  The consumer appeal for green products is creating demand for biobased chemicals and polymers.  It is estimated that 20% of today’s petrochemical production will be replaced with biobased chemicals in the next decade.  Large amounts of renewable carbon in form of fermentable sugars are needed to enable production of next generation biochemicals and biofuels.  Although cellulosic feedstocks are on the horizon, starch and sugars from corn and sugarcane will continue to play an important role in shaping biobased economy around the world.

New partnerships are forming between major starch/sugar processing, biotech, chemical and petrochemical companies to build biorefineries for production of biobased building blocks and/or polymers.  Opportunities, catalyzed by innovation from public-private partnerships and state/federal incentives, exist in major US mid-western states for capital investment, construction of new biorefineries, jobs creation and new markets for biobased products.  Research and development, derisking and commercialization of bioprocessing technologies as well as availability of abundant and cheap carbon are critical to realize widespread benefits of this new economic activity.

About the Speaker

Dr. Vijay Singh is a Distinguished Professor of Bioprocessing in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering and Director of Integrated Bioprocessing Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  His research is on development of bioprocessing technologies for corn/biomass to ethanol, advanced biofuels, food and industrial products.  Dr. Singh currently directs or co-directs more than $116 million research, has authored 165 peer-reviewed journal articles, 70 other publications and holds ten patents related to corn processing and biofuels production.  He has received numerous excellence in research awards from professional societies, academic institutions and trade organizations.  Professor Singh has also received “Excellence in Teaching” and “Innovation in Research” recognition several times.  In 2015, Dr. Singh was selected as University Scholar, highest honor given to a faculty member at the University of Illinois-system wide.  He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Food and Bioprocess Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2410 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Tropospheric Stability Controls of the Evolution and Intensity of Tropical Cyclones

Dr. Tetsuya TAKEMI

Dr. Tetsuya TAKEMI

Associate Professor
Disaster Prevention Research Institute
Kyoto University

Date: 7 March 2018 (Wednesday)
Time: 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Venue: B5-209, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (AC1), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

The physics for the evolution and intensity of tropical cyclones (TCs) has still unknowns, which makes the forecast of TC intensification challenging both from research and operational perspectives. In addition, due to the lack of sufficient understandings of the TC intensification physics, the projection of future changes of the TC intensity under global warming requires further investigations. In this talk, I will focus on the environmental stability control of the evolution and intensity of TCs by using an axisymmetric non-hydrostatic model. Based on our recent study on the future change of Typhoon Vera (1959), a worst-class category-5 storm, we specifically focus on effects of tropospheric temperature lapse rate, tropopause-height temperature, and tropopause height on the evolution and intensity of the TC by conducting a series of numerical experiments in which those environmental conditions are systematically changed. It was found that with the increase in convective available potential energy or in temperature lapse rate the maximum intensity of the simulated TC clearly increases. The temperature lapse rate seems to have the most significant impacts on the evolution and intensity of the simulated TCs. Compared to the lapse rate, the increases in tropopause height and in tropopause-level temperature seem to play a secondary role, although under an unchanged lapse rate condition a higher tropopause and a colder tropopause-temperature would add a positive impact on the intensification of TCs.

About the Speaker

Prof. Tetsuya Takemi obtained his PhD from the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kyoto University. Following appointments at Osaka University, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, he returned to Kyoto University as an Associate Professor. His research includes basic studies on mesoscale and microscale meteorology; tropical convection, tropical cyclones and air-sea interaction; risk assessment of meteorological disasters under climate change; and large-eddy simulation studies of local-scale atmospheric turbulence and dispersion over complex topography and urban districts. He is currently Editor, Scientific Online Letters on the Atmosphere and Co-Chief Editor, Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2414 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

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