Seminars

Selectivity on Zeolite Types in Ionic Liquid-Templated Synthesis

 

Dr. Alex C. K. Yip

Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Canterbury,
Christchurch, New Zealand

Date: 15 April 2019 (Monday)
Time: 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Venue: G5-215, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building ,City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Abstract

Zeolites are widely used in industry for catalysis, ion-exchange, gas/liquid separations and adsorption. Ionothermal synthesis method, in which ionic liquids (ILs) act as both solvent and template/structure-directing agent (SDA), has received great attention due to its almost zero vapor pressure at typical zeolite synthesis temperatures (ca. 170-180 °C). This allows non-pressurized equipment to be used in process scale-up, which is highly attractive from safety and economic point of view. However, the existing reports in literature show that a wide range of random zeolite types tend to form when ionic liquids were used for zeolite synthesis.

We systematically studied the effect of various ILs, such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([EMIM]Br), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([EMIM]Cl), 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([BMIM]Br), 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl), 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium methanesulfonate ([BMIM]CH3SO3), on the resulted zeolite products using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), fumed silica and colloidal silica as the Si sources. The results also showed that the morphology of the product zeolite can be tailored using appropriate ILs as a soft template and that anisotropic behavior can be obtained in zeolite catalysis. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to give insights into the ILs-zeolite interactions, from which a general guideline of using ILs for precise zeolite control will be elucidated.

About the Speaker

Dr. Alex Yip received his BE(Hon) in Chemical Engineering from the University of New South Wales in 2003. He obtained his MPhil in Environmental Engineering and PhD in Chemical Engineering from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 2005 and 2009, respectively, studying energy and environmental catalysis. Dr. Yip was a postdoctoral fellow in Professor Enrique Iglesia’s group at the University of California, Berkeley, working on methanol-to-triptane process via solid acids and zeolite chemistry. He is now a Senior Lecturer “Above the Bar” (Equivalent to Associate Professor in the US University system) and the Principal Investigator of the Energy and Environmental Catalysis Group at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. Dr. Yip is also an Adjunct Professor at the Guangdong University of Petrochemical Technology in China and is currently the Vice President of the Australasian Particle Technology Society (APTS). He is also an Editorial Board Member of Advanced Powder Technology and Carbon Resources Conversion, and a Review Editor of Nanoenergy Technologies and Materials [Frontiers].

Dr. Yip has extensive experience on synthesis and applications of microporous/mesoporous catalytic materials. His current research focusing on developing novel catalytic systems for biomass conversion to biofuel and high value products under mild reaction conditions. He has expertise in identifying the relationship between the catalyst structures, including morphology, pore shape, spatial constraints etc., and the selectivity of products produced from reactions relevant to energy and environmental applications. Results of his recent projects were published in high-calibre journals, e.g. Journal of the American Chemical Society (IF: 14.357), Journal of Materials Chemistry A (IF: 9.931), Chemistry of Materials (IF: 9.890), Green Chemistry (IF: 8.586), Nano Research (IF: 7.994) and Chemical Engineering Journal (IF: 6.735) etc.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk (email) or 3442 2410 (tel.).

~All are Welcome~

 

Current status and new developments on high-temperature heat pumps for industrial applications

 

Prof. Alberto Coronas

CREVER-Group of Applied Thermal Engineering, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Països Catalans 26, Tarragona, Spain

Date: 17 April 2019 (Wednesday)
Time: 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Venue: G4-302, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building ,City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Abstract

High-temperature heat pumps (HTHPs) are regarded as a viable and attractive solution to upgrade low-to-medium temperature industrial waste/excess heat to a useful temperature level for many industrial processes. It can be implemented in a wide range of industries as heat recovery solutions, including beverage, chemical, food, paper, leather, and textile industries. Furthermore, there are ongoing research and development activities to fully utilize the heat recovery potential of HTHPs at a heat supply temperature above 90°C.

This lecture reviews the current status and new developments on high-temperature heat pumps with heat supply temperatures above 90°C for industrial applications. Besides the vapor compression heat pumps, the focus of this work is on absorption heat pumps, absorption heat transformers and compression-resorption heat pumps. Moreover, recent advancements in compressor technologies and working fluids for high-temperature vapor compression heat pumps are also highlighted. A few manufacturers are available in the high-temperature heat pump market segment that can supply single-stage LiBr/water absorption heat transformer and ammonia/water compression-resorption heat pump technologies. The heating capacity range of the commercial LiBr/water heat transformers is from 150 to 10,000 kW, while the thermal COP is between 0.45 and 0.50 at temperature lifts of up to 50 K. The commercially available compression-resorption technology delivers heat up to 120°C, while the obtained electrical COPs are about 6.1 (at 22 K lift), 4.3 (at 65 K lift) and 2.4 (at 75 K lift). Many theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out in order to extend the limit of achievable temperature lift and COP of high-temperature heat pumps.

There is a strong potential for absorption heat transformers and compression/resorption heat pump technologies for high-temperature lift and heat supply temperature above 160°C, which is the current limit for vapor compression heat pump technology. Therefore, in order to capitalize these potentials, future research and development activities are mainly directed towards the following areas: (i)-on working fluid pairs to alleviate the drawbacks of the conventional working fluid mixtures, (ii) – system components size reduction so that the size and capital cost of the heat pump reduced, and (iii) – system (cycle) configurations to obtain higher temperature lift than the single-stage AHT, while maintaining the COP or with reasonable lower COP values.

 

About the Speaker

Prof. Alberto Coronas obtained his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from Barcelona University (Barcelona, Spain) in 1974 and 1979, respectively. He received his Ph.D. in 1983 from the Barcelona University (Barcelona, Spain). He started his research into absorption refrigeration and heat pumps during a postdoctoral stay under the supervision of Prof. Robert Bugarel in the Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Ingénieurs en Génie Chimique (Toulouse, France) in 1985. He worked as lecturer at the Chemistry Faculty (Tarragona) of the Barcelona University until 1994.  He worked as lecturer at the Mechanical Engineering Department of Rovira i Virgili University until 2001 and since then as full professor on Thermal Engineering. In the period 2008-15, he was the academic coordinator of the postgraduate program on Air Conditioning Technologies and Energy Efficiency in Buildings, and from 2009 coordinates at the Rovira i Virgili University the master and doctorate program in Thermodynamics Engineering of Fluids.  He is the head and founder of the Research Group on Applied Thermal Engineering (CREVER) since 1994.

His research activity covers the field of absorption technology for industrial refrigeration, heat pumps and chillers, heat and mass transfer in sorption processes and thermophysical properties of new working mixtures, and polygeneration technologies. He has supervised more than 30 Ph.D. theses and published around 250-refereed technical publications. He has participated and coordinated many national and international projects related with the development of absorption chillers and the energy efficiency monitoring and analysis of cooling plants. He has a very good knowledge on cooling applications in industries (agrofood, petrochemicals, plastics manufacturing, etc) and the recent developments in the cooling market from new systems to advances in existing technologies. The research group is also internationally recognized by its knowledge on the development of new configurations of advanced absorption chillers using conventional and new working fluids.
Prof. Coronas has served on many scientific committees of such international conferences as International Sorption Heat Pump Conference, Solar Air Conditioning Conference, International Polygeneration Conference (2007, 2011, 2015, 2017, and 2019), IMPRES (2013, 2017), CYTEF, Gustav Lorentzen Conferences on Natural refrigerants etc.  

He served as managing Guest Editor for Applied Thermal Engineering (Elsevier) in 2012, 2016 and 2018 and for the Science and Technology for the Built Environment (CRC Press Group) in 2015. Professor Coronas served as a vice-president of Commission E2 Heat Pumps, energy recovery of the International Institute of Refrigeration IIR between 2012 and 2015 before becoming President. 6.735) etc.

 

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk (email) or 3442 2410 (tel.).

~All are Welcome~

 

Colloquium: Climate Change and Extreme Weather – A Clear and Present Danger

Mr SHUN Chi-ming

Director of the Hong Kong Observatory
The Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region

Date: 24 April 2019 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Venue: SAE Magnetics Lecture Theatre (LT9), 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building ,City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Abstract

2018 continued to be an eventful year in the world in terms of extreme weather with heatwaves, wild fires, extreme rainfall, and destructive tropical cyclones ravaging different parts of the world.  The year 2019 also started with extreme temperatures ranging from exceeding 49oC in parts of South Australia to -30oC in the Midwest of the United States in January.  The impacts of climate change are clearly seen. 

Against the backdrop of global climate change and local urbanization, Hong Kong is not immune to their impacts.  In the last century, Hong Kong has experienced significant changes in climate, including long term warming trend, rising sea level, and more frequent extreme weather.  The ferocious strike of Super Typhoons Hato and Mangkhut to Hong Kong and the Pearl River Estuary successively in 2017 and 2018 is indeed a timely reminder of the threat of extreme weather.  Review of historical storms further hints the possibility of even worse super typhoons hitting this region.  Looking into the future, climate projections continue to picture a warming climate with more variable rainfall, more frequent extreme weather, and increases in tropical cyclone risks, including the increasing threat of storm surge due to sea level rise and more intense typhoons.  In this talk, the present and future climate change and extreme weather hazards will be reviewed and the associated challenges to the sustainable development of Hong Kong and the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area will be discussed.

 

About the Speaker

Mr Shun joined the Hong Kong Observatory in 1986 after graduating from the University of Hong Kong as Bachelor of Science.  After joining the Observatory, he received professional training in nuclear radiation and weather forecasting in the United Kingdom.  Mr Shun specialized in aeronautical meteorology since the 1990s and led a team of researchers to develop the world-first and award-winning Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) Windshear Alerting System for the Hong Kong International Airport.  Mr Shun was appointed as Director of the Hong Kong Observatory in April 2011.  In the international arena, Mr Shun was President of the Commission for Aeronautical Meteorology (CAeM) of the UN World Meteorological Organization (WMO) from February 2010 to July 2018.  Mr Shun is also Permanent Representative of Hong Kong, China with WMO, Chair of the Hong Kong Meteorological Society, Fellow of the Royal Meteorological Society (FRMetS) and Member of the Chinese Meteorological Society Executive Committee.

 

Registration

The Colloquium is open to all. SEE students are required to register via AIMS in just a few steps: Go to AIMS, select “Student Services”, then select “Central Repository on Student Development Activities System” and search the activity name “SEE Colloquium: Climate Change and Extreme Weather – A Clear and Present Danger” or the activity code “E2- 2019-0157”

 

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk (email) or 3442 4022 (tel.).

~All are Welcome~

 

Green finance and sustainable commodities

 

Dr. Anthony Yuen

Head of Commodities, Pan-Asia
Citi Research, Citigroup

Date: 13 March 2019 (Wednesday)
Time: 12:00 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
Venue: Room B4302, 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (YEUNG), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Registration: Please click here

About the Speaker

Dr. Anthony Yuen is Head of Commodities Strategy for Pan-Asia at Citi. He focuses on energy/environmental, cross-commodity, and cross-asset strategies.  He has deep expertise in energy, from oil, natural gas/LNG and coal to power, renewables and emissions. He also leads cross-asset projects involving the upstream, midstream, downstream, utilities, petchem, and mining sectors in equities and increasingly credits.  He was based in New York as the Head of Energy Strategy before coming to Asia. 

Prior to joining Citi in 2011, Anthony worked at McKinsey in the Greater China region and at Constellation Commodities Group in the US, where he was involved in the strategies and trading functions. He previously held research and teaching positions at the University of Pennsylvania and was a faculty member of Columbia University.

Widely cited in the media, he is frequently invited to speak at major organizations and conferences, including the Aspen Institute, Brookings, CSIS, IEA/OPEC/IEF, IIF, MIT, NREL, etc. He is a reviewer of IEA’s World Energy Outlook and World Energy Investments, and has advised the US EIA.

Anthony received his bachelor’s and his master’s degrees in engineering (electrical/computer/photonics) from the University of Toronto, and his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania. He is a member and was an Ambassador Lecturer for the Society of Petroleum Engineers.

Please note that the registration is on a first-come-first-served basis

https://cap.cityu.edu.hk/studentlan/postDetail.aspx?id=A16x1520s192802D668926

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk (email) or 3442 7359 (tel.).

~All are Welcome~

 

Colloquium: Promoting Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in Hong Kong

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Ir. Harry LAI Hon-chung, JP

Deputy Director/Regulatory Services
Electrical and Mechanical Services Department (EMSD)
The Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region

Date: 13 March 2019 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 5:30pm
Venue: F.A.M. Lecture Theatre (LT8), Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Language: English

Abstract

Climate change has become a global challenge today. Being part of the international community, the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region has been striving to formulate and implement policies in combating climate change and building a sustainable and low-carbon environment. The EMSD, as a government agency taking a leading role in making Hong Kong a top-ranking city in the utilization of energy, will share their experience and journey in promoting energy efficiency and conservation as well as adoption of more renewable energy in the past decades. In addition to their key strategies, namely leading by examples, public engagement and legislation, Ir LAI will brief you how EMSD has been serving as a facilitator and promotor in achieving energy efficiency by collaborating with local universities and start-up's through adoption of innovative technologies. Facilitation measures to encourage private sector to adopt more distributed renewable energy to support the Feed-in Tariff Scheme introduced recently will also be discussed.

About the Speaker

Ir Harry LAI is the Deputy Director/Regulatory Services of the EMSD. He joined the EMSD in 1981 and has served in many strategic positions in the Department as well as in different policy bureaux of the Government. He is currently overseeing the enforcement of regulatory functions and implementation of various initiatives on electrical, mechanical, gas and railway safety as well as energy efficiency and conservation. Ir LAI is representing Hong Kong, China to attend the APEC Energy Working Group (EWG) meetings, and was responsible for leading his team to host the EWG55 meeting in Hong Kong in May 2018.

Ir LAI received his Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering and Master of Science degree in Environmental Management both from the University of Hong Kong. He is a Chartered Engineer, a Fellow of the Hong Kong Institution of Engineers (HKIE), a Fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), and a Corporate Member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE). In the HKIE, Ir LAI has served as the Chairman of the Nuclear Division, the Secretary of the Electrical Disciplinary Advisory Panel and is currently a member of the Fellowship Committee.

Registration

The Colloquium is open to all. SEE students are required to register via AIMS in just a few steps: Go to AIMS, select "Student Services", then select "Central Repository on Student Development Activities System" and search the activity name "SEE Colloquium: Promoting Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in Hong Kong" or the activity code "E2- 2019-0029".

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk (email) or 3442 4022 (tel.).

~All are Welcome~

 

Linking Global Climate and Air Quality with Atmospheric Chemistry: Roles of Carbonaceous Aerosols and Chlorine Chemistry

 

Dr. Xuan WANG

Postdoctoral Fellow
Harvard University

Date: 20 March 2019 (Wednesday)
Time: 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Venue: G4302, 4/F Yeung Kin Man Academic Building , City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Abstract

This talk will highlight two topics in atmospheric chemistry: the direct climate impact of carbonaceous aerosols, and tropospheric chlorine chemistry. They both have potentially large but still very uncertain roles in global climate and air quality.

Atmospheric aerosols are important due to their adverse effects on human health and their radiative effects on climate, which are significant and very uncertain factors contributing to global climate change. In estimating the direct radiative effect (DRE), the absorption from carbonaceous aerosols, including black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC, a component of organic aerosol, OA), are highly uncertain. This presentation will address this uncertainty by combining models and observations to better constrain the optical properties and radiative impact of carbonaceous aerosols. Our work suggests that policies for reducing emissions of carbonaceous aerosols may have a limited impact on mitigating global climate warming. 

Mobilization of chloride (Cl-) from sea salt aerosol and anthropogenic emissions are large sources of chlorine gases to the troposphere. These gases may generate chlorine radicals with a broad range of implications for tropospheric chemistry. Here I will present a comprehensive analysis of chlorine chemistry within the framework of the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model, its coupling to other halogens, and the implications for tropospheric oxidants and air quality.

About the Speaker

Dr. Xuan Wang received his Ph.D. in Environmental Chemistry from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2017. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University. His research interests include atmospheric gases and aerosols and their effect on air quality and climate, with specific focus on modeling the chemistry process in troposphere.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk (email) or 3442 4022 (tel.).

~All are Welcome~

 

Impact of deposition of light absorbing aerosols on Himalayas-Tibetan-Plateau snowcover and influence on the Asian summer monsoon: A possible mechanism for the Blanford hypothesis

 

Dr. William K.M. LAU

Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Centre (ESSIC), The University of Maryland

Date: 26 March 2019 (Tuesday)
Time: 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Venue: B5-210, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building , City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Abstract

Over a century ago, Blanford (1884) discovered a significant relationship between snowcover in the Himalayas and the Indian monsoon strength, referred to in the modern era as the Blanford Hypothesis (BH).   Despite a large number of studies on the BH, fundamental mechanisms linking the physics of snowcover and snowmelt to monsoon dynamics remain poorly known.   In this study, we investigated the impact of snow darkening by deposition of light-absorbing aerosols (LAAs) on snow cover over the Himalayas–Tibetan Plateau (HTP) and subsequent influence on the Asian summer monsoon. We used the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model Version 5 (GEOS-5) that possesses improved aerosol physical package, including detailed radiative transfer by LAAs, i.e., dust, black carbon and organic carbon, as well as emission, transport, and deposition processes in the atmosphere and in snow.

Results show that during April–May–June, the deposition of LAAs on snow leads to a reduction in surface albedo, initiating a sequence of radiative and dynamical feedback processes, starting with increased net surface solar radiation, rapid snowmelt in the HTP and warming of the surface and upper troposphere, followed by enhanced low-level southwesterlies and increased dust loading over the Himalayas–Indo-Gangetic Plain. The warming is accelerated by increased dust aerosol heating, and subsequently amplified by latent heating from enhanced precipitation over the Himalayan foothills and northern India, via the elevated heat pump (EHP) effect during June–July–August. The reduced snow cover in the HTP anchors the enhanced heating over the Tibetan Plateau and its southern slopes, in conjunction with an enhancement of the Tibetan Anticyclone, and the development of an anomalous Rossby wave train over East Asia, leading to a northward displacement of the subtropical westerly jet, and the Mei-Yu rain belt, with reduction in rainfall in southern China.   The impacts by pre-monsoonal accumulation of Middle East Dust over the North Arabian Sea and the Himalayas Gangetic region on seasonal-to-interannual predictability of the Asian summer monsoon will be discussed.

About the Speaker

Dr. William K. M. Lau is a senior scientist at ESSIC, and adjunct professor of the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Maryland.  He received his B. Sc. (Mathematics and Physics) in 1972, and B. Sc. Special (Applied Mathematics), in 1973 from University of Hong Kong, his PhD in Atmospheric Sciences, 1977, from the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, U.S.  He was assistant professor at the Naval Postgraduate School, 1978-1980, before joining the NASA Goddard Space Flight center in 1981.  He served as the Head of the Climate and Radiation Branch (1991-2000), Chief, the Laboratory for Atmospheres (2001-2010), and the Deputy Director for Science, Earth Science Division, NASA GSFC (2011-2014).  His research spans 4 decades covering a wide range of topics in climate dynamics, tropical and monsoon meteorology, ocean-atmosphere interaction, aerosol-water cycle interaction, climate variability and change. He frequently visits international research and academic institutions in China, India, Southeast Asia, Taiwan, Hong Kong, North and South America, and Europe to present invited lectures, and keynote speeches in scientific meetings to promote interests and awareness in regional impacts of climate variability and change.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk (email) or 3442 2412 (tel.).

~All are Welcome~

 

Colloquium: China and Hong Kong Climate and Energy Challenges

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EurIng. Henry K. H. Wang

FRSA, FIChemE, C.Eng, MCMI, MSc, BSc, DMS, DIC.

Date: 21 February 2019 (Thursday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 5:30pm
Venue: John Chan Lecture Theatre (LT11), Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Language: English

Abstract

The speech will highlight the major Climate and Energy challenges facing China and Hong Kong. It will also review the various key climate, energy and clean energy transformation actions being undertaken and planned. These are based on the author's 3 published books and his two new books plus his recent paper to the House of Lords Energy Panel.

About the Speaker

EurIng. Henry K. H. Wang is an international adviser, author & speaker with extensive high level business experience globally. He is President of Gate International Ltd and was a former director of both Shell China and SABIC in Riyadh. He is also Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts FRSA and Fellow of Institute of Chemical Engineering. He is advising leading companies, universities and institutions globally. He has been invited to join the London University SOAS SCI Advisory Board and the University College London China Advisory Boards.

He is writing, advising and speaking on Climate Change, Green Finance, Carbon & Clean Energy. He has been invited to join the Imperial College London Grantham Climate Change Stakeholder Committee and the China Carbon Forum Advisory Board. FT has invited him to speak on Renewables and join their Energy Panel interviews.

He has published various books, technical and management papers globally. Routledge has published globally his three book “Successful Business Dealings & Management with China Oil, Gas & Chemical Giants”, “Energy Markets in Emerging Economies: Strategies for Growth” and “Business Negotiations in China”. Routledge has invited him to write two new books on Climate Change & Renewables. His negotiation management paper was selected as one of Top Five UK Management Papers of the Year 2015. He also holds international patents on new process inventions. He has been invited to speak at international conferences, leading universities and business schools.

He has been invited to lead and lecture at various executive education programs globally. Trinity College Business School in Dublin has invited him to be co-director of their China executive program. He has been invited to contribute to executive programs on China, negotiations, energy, climate change, renewables, management, green finance etc.

Registration

The Colloquium is open to all. SEE students are required to register via AIMS in just a few steps: Go to AIMS, select "Student Services", then select "Central Repository on Student Development Activities System" and search the activity name "SEE Colloquium: China and Hong Kong Climate and Energy Challenges" or the activity code "E2- 2019-0086".

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk (email) or 3442 4022 (tel.).

~All are Welcome~

 

Transportation Policies and Equilibrium Sorting: Evidence from Beijing

 

Prof. Shanjun LI

Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University

Date: 4 March 2019 (Monday)
Time: 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Venue: G5-215, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Language: English

Abstract

Air pollution and traffic congestion are two of the most pressing urban challenges in many fast-growing economies. Various transportation policies from both the demand and supply sides including congestion pricing, driving restrictions, the gasoline tax, and the expansion of public transit have been adopted to address these issues. We develop and estimate a residential location sorting model to examine the interactions of transportation policies and household sorting. The sorting model incorporate commuting decisions and generates equilibrium predictions of household locations under different transportation policies. We estimate the model parameters using a large household travel survey and rich housing transaction data in Beijing. The analysis illustrates the importance of incorporating travel mode choices in household location decisions and the importance of understanding sorting behavior in designing effective transportation policies.

About the Speaker

Prof. Shanjun Li is the Kenneth L. Robinson Professor of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell University. He serves as co-Director of the Cornell Institute for China Economic Research (CICER). He is a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and a university fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF). His research areas include environmental and energy economics, empirical industrial organization and Chinese economy.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk (email) or 3442 2412 (tel.).

~All are Welcome~

 

The Electric Gini: Income Redistribution through Energy Prices

 

Prof. Arik LEVINSON

Department of Economics, Georgetown University

Date: 6 March 2019 (Wednesday)
Time: 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Venue: G5-215, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Language: English

Abstract

Most electric utilities in the United States charge two-part tariffs to residential customers: fixed monthly fees insufficient to cover the fixed costs of power plants and transmission lines, and per-kWh volumetric prices in excess of the marginal cost of providing electricity. And more and more utilities charge increasing block prices, higher prices to ratepayers that use more electricity. One obvious reason is equity. We first show that in theory, price setters concerned about inequality will charge lower-than-efficient fixed monthly fees and higher-than-efficient per-kWh prices, and will target higher users with even higher prices. Then we use a new dataset of more than 1300 utilities across the US to show that these theoretical predictions are borne out in practice. Utilities whose ratepayers have more unequal incomes have more redistributive electricity pricing schemes, charging less to low users and more to high users. Utilities with more ratepayers who vote Democratic, with higher costs, and with higher fractions of commercial or industrial customers have more redistributive residential pricing. To quantify these comparisons, we develop a new measure of the redistributive extent of utility pricing that we call the "electric Gini."

About the Speaker

Arik Levinson is a Professor in the Economics Department of Georgetown University and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has served as a Senior Economist on President Obama's Council of Economic Advisers, as a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board, and as a co-editor of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management and the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. Arik's current research projects include a calculation of how the environmental consequences of American consumers' choices have differed across income groups over time; a comparison of energy taxes and efficiency standards; and an analysis of the redistributive consequences of electricity pricing.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk (email) or 3442 2412 (tel.).

~All are Welcome~

 

Colloquium: The Making of Air Induction Unit (AIU)

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Dr. Vincent Cheng

Arup Fellow
Director of Building Sustainability Group
ARUP

Date: 23 January 2019 (Wednesday)
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
* Light Refreshments will be served starting from 5:30pm
Venue: Room 1503, Li Dak Sum Yip Yio Chin Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Language: English

Abstract

Innovation is the key in all industries which always push forward the existing technology to better performance. Upon the recent demand on sustainability design, Arup HK has invented an Air Induction Unit which creates natural breeze for the application of built environment. Its seamless design easily integrates the ventilating device with the architectural design. It also brings benefit to the environment. This talk will focus on the invention process to inspire the students to have more brilliant ideas to contribute to the world. The worldwide visions and trends on sustainability development will also be discussed.

About the Speaker

Dr Vincent Cheng is an Arup Fellow, Director of Building Sustainability Group and Global Leader of Environment and Building System Skill Network in Arup. He leads the Group to practice primarily on sustainable developments and low carbon building design in East Asia Region. He has been involving in many pivotal projects of green buildings including CIC Zero Carbon Building, District Cooling projects in Kai Tak Development Area and West Kowloon Cultural District as well as Hysan Place, 18 King Wah Road, South Beach, PingAn IFC. Under his leadership, Arup was crowned “the BEAM consultant with most BEAM Plus Final and Provisional Platinum Projects” by HKGBC in 2015.

Dr Cheng is a Director of Hong Kong Green Building Council; a member in the Energy Advisory Committee of Environment Bureau and a member in the Expanded Building Committee of Buildings Department of HKSAR government; and has served in many professional bodies championing the sustainability of Hong Kong, including PGBC, BEC and HKIE. He is also a member of Advisory Committee of the School of Energy and Environment of City University of Hong Kong and the School of Engineering of Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

He has authored a book titled “Building Sustainability in East Asia: Policy, Design and People” in 2017.

Registration

The Colloquium is open to all. SEE students are required to register via AIMS in just a few steps: Go to AIMS, select “Student Services”, then select “Central Repository on Student Development Activities System” and search the activity name “SEE Colloquium: The Making of Air Induction Unit (AIU)” or the activity code “E2-2018-1786”.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk (email) or 3442 4022 (tel.).

~All are Welcome~

 

Sources and characteristics of the haze particles from Indonesian wildfire event in 2015

Dr. Sri Hapsari Budisulistiorini

Research Fellow, Earth Observatory of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University Singapore

Date: 31 December 2018 (Monday)
Time: 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Venue: G5-215, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (YEUNG), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Language: English

Abstract

Recurring transboundary haze from Indonesian wildfires in previous decades significantly elevated particulate matter (PM) concentrations in Southeast Asia. The elevated PM reduced visibility in Singapore, which is located around 200 km from the closest wildfires site in Indonesia. Light-absorbing brown carbon (BrC) constituents of organic aerosol (OA) have been shown to significantly absorb ultraviolet (UV) and visible light and thus impact visibility and radiative forcing. However, sources and light-absorbing properties of the haze particles are still less understood.

During that event on 10 to 31 October 2015, we conducted a real-time observation of non-refractory submicron PM (NR-PM1) in Singapore using an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer. Simultaneously, we measured carbonaceous components, OA tracers, and BrC constituents from ambient fine PM (PM2.5) samples and laboratory Indonesian peat and biomass burning aerosols to support source apportionment of the online measurements.

The real-time analysis demonstrated that OA accounted for approximately 80 % of NR-PM1 mass during the wildfire haze period. Source apportionment analysis applied to the OA mass spectra using the multilinear-engine (ME-2) approach resulted in four factors: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), peat burning OA (PBOA), and oxygenated OA (OOA). The OOA can be considered as a surrogate of both secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and oxidized primary organic aerosol (OPOA), while the other factors are considered as surrogates of primary organic aerosol (POA). The OOA accounted for approximately 50% of the total OA mass in NR-PM1 of the total OA mass. From the offline analysis, we identified 41 compounds that can potentially absorb near-UV and visible wavelengths, such as oxygenated−conjugated compounds, nitroaromatics, and S-containing compounds from the combusted Indonesian peat and biomasses. The BrC constituents contributes on average 24% of the total OA mass from laboratory biomass burning and 0.4% during the haze event. However, large uncertainties in mass closure remain because of the lack of authentic standards.

Our findings highlight the importance of atmospheric chemical processes, which likely include POA oxidation and SOA formation from oxidation of gaseous precursors, to the OOA concentration. Atmospheric processes could also affect the composition of haze particles that change their light-absorbing properties. As this research could not separately quantify the POA oxidation and SOA formation processes, future studies should attempt to investigate the contribution of gaseous precursor oxidation and POA aging to the OOA formation as well as BrC constituents in wildfire plumes.

About the Speaker

Dr. Sri Hapsari Budisulistiorini is an atmospheric scientist whose research activities are driven by a wish for healthy air quality and sustainable environment. She is a research fellow at Earth Observatory of Singapore of Nanyang Technological University Singapore. Her research interests lie in combining real-time and offline analytical techniques as well as numerical methods to characterize organic aerosol in the atmosphere. Her recent work focuses on identifying sources and optical characteristics of haze particles from wildfires that blanketed Southeast Asia. 

She obtained her Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Engineering (Atmospheric Chemistry) from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the United States, an M.Eng.Sc (Environmental Coursework) from the University of Melbourne in Australia, and B.Eng. (Environmental Engineering) from the Diponegoro University in Indonesia. For her Ph.D. and M.Eng.Sc., she received the Fulbright Presidential scholarship and the Australian Partnership Scholarship awards, respectively.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk (email) or tel: 3442 7359.

~All are Welcome~

 

SEE Tech Talk Series on Waste Management and Treatment

Date: 15 December 2018 (Saturday)
Time: 09:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Venue: Tin Ka Ping Lecture Theatre (LT-1), 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (YEUNG), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Language: English

Brief description

SEE has been undertaking cutting-edge research to address urgent energy- and environment-related issues in three categories: (1) sustainable technologies for energy, environment and health, (2) urban atmospheric and aquatic environment and (3) smart and healthy cities. In this SEE Tech Talk Series, three SEE faculty members will present their ongoing research on Waste Management and Treatment.

Abstracts & Speakers

Topic 1 – Energy-efficient Emerging Membrane Technologies for Wastewater Treatment and Resource Recovery
Dr. Alicia AN, Assistant Professor

Abstract
The unprecedented demand for water, energy, and food, coupled with the impact of climate change, has presented serious global challenges. The inextricable linkage among the water-energy-food nexus makes a vibrant research question for many scientists to explore innovative technologies for achieving global sustainable development. Hong Kong is no exception to this challenge and to strengthen the growing city’s water security, a new desalination plant has been commissioned. At the same time, considering the excessive concentration of nutrients in Hong Kong’s wastewater, many studies now focus on the development of new technologies with the potential to recover resource from wastewater.

To meet this challenge, a paradigm shift has occurred from conventional centralized water treatment systems to the implementation of decentralized systems. At present, the solution has been mainly to implement decentralized systems for desalination or industrial wastewater treatment and reuse, predominantly using reverse osmosis (RO) technology. However, there exist sectors in wastewater treatment where the rigid operational requirements posed by RO can be limiting. For these niches, membrane-based water and wastewater treatment/reuse/desalination technologies are gaining recognition for their practical applicability where RO is found to be inefficient. In this talk, Dr. An will introduce energy-efficient emerging membrane technologies for wastewater treatment and resource recovery.

About the Speaker
Dr. An received her PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST). Her dissertation on sludge minimization mechanism in Oxic-Settling-Anaerobic process in wastewater treatment system was well received and cited. Since 2009, Dr. An has extended her research and education career with Sustainability concept at the University of Tokyo, Japan.  She has conducted several research projects and field work focused on sustainable water management and urban development.

Topic 2 – Data-driven Decision Making for Waste Management and Resource Efficiency: Path to a Circular Economy
Dr. Shauhrat CHOPRA, Assistant Professor

Abstract
In the 2017 Policy Address, the Hong Kong Government committed to combat climate change by reducing carbon emission up to 70% by 2030. The adoption of a circular economy over a traditional linear economy is one of the key routes to achieve a low carbon future that can mitigate Hong Kong’s waste management crisis as well. Despite the inherent benefits of the circular economy, its adoption is low due to the lack of data and tools for improving resource efficiency and waste management. In this talk, Dr Shauhrat S. Chopra will highlight the utility of tools such as Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). In addition to well-established tools like LCA for data-driven decision making, the talk will also showcase the opportunity for the development of novel Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) tools. In particular, blockchain enabled data-driven tools may have the capability to improve trust and transparency in supply-chain networks, platforms for shared and performance economy, stakeholder participation, and governance and management of organizations. For this reason, Dr Chopra will share the potential opportunities and limitations of the blockchain technology for circular economy applications. Finally, the talk will emphasize the significance of data-driven tools and systems analytics to avoid unintended negative consequences of engineering decisions on the environment.

About the Speaker
Dr. Shauhrat CHOPRA obtained his Integrated Masters of Science in Systems Biology from the University of Hyderabad, India in 2011. He received his PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh, USA, in 2015. His doctoral dissertation was focused on resilience of complex systems including economic systems, industrial symbiosis, and critical infrastructure systems at urban and national levels. Before joining the School of Energy and Environment, Shauhrat worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Institute for Environmental Science and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago, on the U.S. EPA funded LCnano project focused on sustainable design of future transformative nano-enabled products. His data-driven research is focused on designing indicators for sustainability and resilience of the built environment in support of environmental decision-making.

Topic 3 – Extraction of Molecular Hydrogen from Wastewater
Dr. Yun Hau NG, Associate Professor

Abstract
Molecular hydrogen (H2) is a clean energy carrier with high energy density. It is also a chemical reagent for petroleum refining as well as ammonia production. Currently, major production way is based on fossil fuel transformation, including the steam reformation of methane. Water splitting is another popular potential way in producing H2 with low or zero carbon footprint but water decomposition is a thermodynamically challenging reaction. Wastewater containing organic pollutants such as pharmaceutical wastewater, leachate, and industrial process water, on the other hand, can be potentially used to produce H2 with reduced energy requirement during the oxidative removal of such organic carbon inherently present in the water stream. In this presentation, we examine a few potential methods to simultaneously oxidise the organic component (pollutant) in the water and reduce the proton to liberate molecular H2. In particular, electrocatalysis, photocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis would be discussed. Challenges encountered in this waste-to-energy conversion process will be shared in the talk.

About the Speaker
Dr. Yun Hau NG received his B. Sc. (Industrial Chemistry) from the Universiti Teknologi Malaysia in 2003 and his Ph.D from Osaka University (under supervision of Prof. Michio Matsumura) in 2009. After a brief research stay at the Radiation Laboratory, the University of Notre Dame (Prof. Prashant Kamat's group), he joined the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) with the Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship (APD) in 2011. In 2014, he took up a lecturer position at the School of Chemical Engineering, UNSW and was promoted to a tenured Senior Lecturer in 2016.

Dr. Ng’s research is focused on the development of novel photoactive semiconductors system (particles and thin films) for sunlight energy-to-chemicals conversion and storage. Focusing on these topics, he has secured more than AUD$3 million research funding in the last 7 years from various sources including the Australian Research Council. As of April 2018, he has published more than 100 peer-reviewed journal articles including well-recognised journals such as Chem. Rev., Adv. Mater., Adv. Energy Mater., JACS, Energy Environ. Sci, Nano Energy, Small and Chem. Mater. Dr. Ng is currently serving as Editorial Board Member for Scientific Reports and Frontiers in Energy Research. He has also served as a Guest Editor in special issues for Catal. Today (Elsevier), ChemPlusChem (Wiley), Particle and Particle Systems Characterizations (Wiley), and Energies (MDPI).

Dr. Ng has received The Distinguished Lectureship Award from the Chemical Society of Japan in 2018. He was previously named the Honda-Fujishima Prize winner in 2013 as the first non-Japanese recipient, in recognition of his work in the area of photo-driven water splitting. He is also an Emerging Investigator in Energy Materials selected by RSC J. Mater. Chem. A in 2016.

Rundown

09:15 – 09:30 Registration
09:30 – 09:35 Opening Remark
Dr. Denis YU, Associate Professor
Presentations
09:35 – 10:05 Energy-efficient Emerging Membrane Technologies for Wastewater Treatment and Resource Recovery
Dr. Alicia AN, Assistant Professor
10:05 – 10:35 Data-driven Decision Making for Waste Management and Resource Efficiency: Path to a Circular Economy
Dr. Shauhrat CHOPRA, Assistant Professor
10:35 – 10:45 Tea Break
10:45 – 11:15 Extraction of Molecular Hydrogen from Wastewater
Dr. Yun Hau NG, Associate Professor
10:35 – 10:45 Q&A Session

11:45

End of Event

Note: Attendance certificates will be issued to attendees at the end of the event.

Registration: http://cap.cityu.edu.hk/studentlan/postDetail.aspx?id=Y15w1820r183411C867420

Enquiry: Please contact Miss Vivian KONG via e-mail: kong.vivian@cityu.edu.hk or tel: 3442 4426.

~All are Welcome~

 

Two-Day Intensive Workshop for 'Membrane-based Sustainable Water Treatment'

Date: 20 - 21 December 2018
Venue: LT 4, 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (YEUNG), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Please click here for details.

~All are Welcome~

 

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