Seminars

The Complexity of photochemical smog

Professor Mattias Hallquist

Full professor in Atmospheric Chemistry
Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology
University of Gothenburg

Date: 19 October 2018 (Friday)
Time: 4:00 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.
Venue: Y5-304, 5/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building (YEUNG), City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Professor Mattias Hallquist (MH) is a full professor in atmospheric chemistry, who leads the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and traffic emission group at UGOT. He is currently coordinating a 5-year multi-project framework (with ca. 2.4 million Euro funding) on Photochemical Smog in China (Research-Policy) supported by the Swedish Research Council. MH has profound expertise in aerosol and atmospheric chemistry. He has previously been Director of UGOT's Atmosphere and Environment graduate school, Director of the Gothenburg Atmospheric Science Centre (2008-2015) and President of the Nordic Society for Aerosol Research (2004-2008). MH is a member of UGOT's Faculty of Science Research Committee. A primary objective of his research is to assist the molecular understanding of key atmospheric processes through use of high-resolution mass spectrometry, mainly involving experiments in flow reactors (G-FROST and Go:PAM) at UGOT and/or large-scale facilities such as the smog chambers at the research center Jülich in Germany. MH's group is currently undertaking air quality research in China, India and Kenya. In addition, MH and co-workers are characterising the emission from in-use individual vehicles with specific focus on secondary formation of particles. All these laboratory studies and field observations provide important inputs to chemical modelling and, hence, crucial scientific foundations for formulating robust climate and air pollution abatement policies.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 7359 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Very-High Resolution (20 m) Flow and Dust Dispersion Modeling: Oceano Dunes, Oceano, CA

Dr. Yuhe HE

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, US

Date: 22 October 2018 (Monday)
Time: 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Venue: G4302, 4/F, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

High volume horizontal Hydraulic fracturing (HF) has emerged as a revolutionary method to stimulate the tight shale well, and dramatically increased the unconventional oil and gas production. Once the fracturing pressure released, the stimulated well starts to produce a complex saline mixture, referred as hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced water (HF-FPW). Increasing concerns have been raised regarding the environmental impact of releases of this wastewater to aquatic ecosystems. The toxicity of HF-FPW has not been previously reported, and is complicated by the combined complexity of organic and inorganic constituents in HF fluids and deep formation water. My research focuses on characterizing the chemical and toxicological profiles, and exploring the mechanisms of toxicity of HF-FPW. Targeted and untargeted organic analyses have revealed the HF-FPW contains numerous organics including natural hydrocarbons, additive organics, and potential secondary by-products. Acute and sub-chronic toxicity of HF-FPW was assessed on aquatic invertebrate and fish models. The adverse effects and toxic mechanism of HF-FPW on biotransformation, oxidative stress, endocrine disruption, and embryo development were also evaluated in fish models by using a variety of enzymatic, biochemical, and molecular tools. Overall, this work is the first study to demonstrate the chemical and toxicological complexity of real HF-FPW samples, and has improved our understanding on mechanisms of toxicity of this complex petroleum-associated wastewater and its potential impacts on aquatic ecosystem.

About the Speaker

Dr. Yuhe (Henry) He obtained his B.Sc. and M.Phil. from City University of Hong Kong, and Ph.D. in Toxicology from University of Saskatchewan. He is currently a postdoc fellow at University of Alberta. He is interested in how aquatic organisms respond when exposed to environmental contaminants and stressors. In particular, his research focuses on understanding the mechanism that lead to toxicity in aquatic organisms exposed to various natural and anthropogenic chemical stressors at the molecular and biochemical level. Currently, he is studying the emerging petroleum-associated wastewater issue in North America – the toxicity of hydraulic fracturing flowback and produced water using a variety of molecular and biochemical biomarkers on invertebrate and fish models. His other research interests include environmental toxicity and impact assessment on advance oxidation treatment, nanomaterial, nanopesticide, brominated flame retardants, and other emerging contaminants.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 4022 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

Silicone Nanofilaments and the DAGS Approach: Turning Natural Products into High-Performance Materials

Prof. Dr. Stefan Seeger

Prof. Dr. Stefan Seeger

University of Zurich, Department of Chemistry

Date: 25 October 2018 (Thursday)
Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Venue: LI-1100, 1/F, Li Dak Sum Yip Yio Chin Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Organizer:

School of Energy and Environment
City University of Hong Kong

Abstract

Novel nanostructures synthesized by polycondensation reactions of various silane precursors are presented. Our group was the first synthesizing silicone nanofilaments which are very useful for a simple conversion of surfaces, e.g. from hydrophilic into superhydrophobic surfaces. Subsequent reaction schemes lead to all kind of wetting and antiwetting properties including superoleophobic surfaces. Various application fields will be addressed. Due to appropriate adjustment of the reaction conditions it is shown that many other nanostructures can be synthesized, e.g. nano-vessels, discs, nanotubes etc.

Applications, in particular the upgrading of basic natural products into high performance products for construction materials, fabric finishing, and products for pollution removal and degradation are presented.

About the Speaker

Stefan Seeger studied chemistry at University of Heidelberg under Technical University Berlin. In 1992, he earned his PhD degree. He later studied Business administration at FernUniversität Hagen. In 1992 he established a research group for biophysical chemistry at the University of Heidelberg. After working as a postdoctoral student at the University of Lund in Sweden, he returned in 1994 to University of Heidelberg to finish his habilitation in 1997. Later that year, he was appointed as a professor for Biosensors at the University of Regensburg/Germany. In 1999, he was appointed at University of Zurich/Switzerland to a chair for physical chemistry. In 2001, he was appointed as the director of the Institute for Physical Chemistry. Currently he is a member of the board of the new Chemistry Institute at this University. Seeger invented for example the surface sensitive analysis Supercritical Angle Spectroscopy techniques, Silicone Nanofilaments, and the DAGS chemical synthesis approach. He is the founder of technology companies, e.g. Molecular Machines & Industries, the leading provider of single cell isolation technologies.

Enquiry: see.enquiry@cityu.edu.hk  (email), 3442 2412 (Tel.)

~All are Welcome~

 

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