Events

In a Class of its own - CLASS Awards Day 2017

Prof Christian Wagner, Associate Provost and the officiating guest, delivered an address at the ceremony.

CHEN Shiqi, JIN Xin, LAI King-on, LAW Yuen-sun, PANG Kin, TAM Chung-yan


WU Ting-wei

Angel PHUONG

NGAI On-chi, WONG Lok-yan, WU Ching-yan

Dr CHAN Heng-choon Oliver

Dr Yanto CHANDRA

Dr CHONG Pui-man Melody

HUA Congchao

Daniel Madrid MORALES

Dr LI Wanxin

Dr FUNG Lai-chu Annis

Dr Christoph A. HAFNER

(From left) Hody Chan (teacher), So Eliz Bonnie,Lam Kwan-yuet, Ip Long-chun, Lau Hei-yuen,Lam Hei-suet and Wong Tse-yui from HKUGA College

The CLASS Awards Day at the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (CLASS) of City University of Hong Kong (CityU) celebrates excellence in academic research and teaching by the College’s professors and students. Awards presented at this year’s ceremony, which took place on May 19, included the Teaching Innovation Award, the Excellence in Knowledge Transfer Award, the New Researcher Award, and the Discovery-enriched Curriculum (DEC) Award for Students. The event was broadcast live on YouTube, CLASS’s Facebook page, and the College’s website, so that people who could not attend in person were able to watch the celebrations.

As part of a drive for community engagement, the College introduced the CLASS Mini Movie Competition for Secondary Students, which encouraged students to explore issues in their community. The College also hosted a luncheon and a guided tour for a group of secondary school principals, career masters/mistresses and teachers. Ms. LI Wai-bing Vickie, principal of Tuen Mun Government Secondary School, said the tour of CLASS’s Creative Media Centre was an eye-opening experience.

“Hong Kong actively supports the development of the creative and innovation sector,” Li noted. “We have students who are very keen on a career in this field. I hope these students will have a chance to visit the Creative Media Centre of CityU for an enhanced understanding of the production and latest developments in the media and communication field.”

Discovery-enriched Curriculum Award

The winners of the Discovery-enriched Curriculum Award demonstrate a drive for discovery and innovation, and show a commitment to community engagement.


Undergraduate Champion (Group)
CHEN Shiqi, JIN Xin, LAI King-on, LAW Yuen-sun, PANG Kin, TAM Chung-yan
Department of Applied Social Sciences
Project: Utilising Virtual Reality to Enhance English Speech Performance

This study investigated the effects of a simulated virtual reality public speaking environment on second-language speech performance. The students wanted to find out if virtual reality could be used to improve second language efficacy. The findings suggest that the physiological and behavioural responses of Cantonese speaking participants in the virtual environment are similar to their responses in a live environment. The study may benefit secondary and university students by giving them more opportunities to hone their public speaking skills in a second language.

Team member Law Yuen-sun said that the challenges included analysing the qualitative and quantitative data collected through lab experiments. “The next step of our study is to find out if we can achieve the same results and impact when we incorporate the virtual reality simulated public speaking environment into a training programme,” Law said.


Undergraduate Champion (Individual)
WU Ting-wei
Department of Linguistics and Translation
Project: An Eye-tracking Study of Cognitive Effort Allocation across Translation Subtasks

This is a pilot study designed to build an understanding of the cognitive process of translators. Based on this understanding, a predictive model of translation, and appropriate machine aids for computer-aided translation, can be developed. It was also designed to uncover the secrets of the translation process through a video-based eye tracking system, and to discover how translators distribute cognitive efforts among distinct subtasks.


Postgraduate Champion (Individual)
LI Tsz-kwan
Department of Linguistics and Translation
Project: Chinese is a sexist language: A re-examination

This project offers a comprehensive review of the linguistic imageries of men and women in the Chinese language and provides evidence to show that the language discriminates against women. It has the potential to heighten sensitivity to the use of sexist language. Fighting against the discrimination inherent in the Chinese language will help to create a more balanced and equitable society for Chinese men and women.


Undergraduate Runner-up (Individual)
Angel PHUONG
Department of Applied Social Sciences
Project: I can have a colourful and thriving life with Bipolar I Disorder!

The results of Phuong’s study show that those with mental illnesses can make use of their own abilities and strengths to cope with their illness, and live successfully. People around mentally ill individuals should encourage them by identifying and helping them to develop their potential and their own “personal medicine”.


Undergraduate Runner-up (Individual)
NG Wing-lam
Department of Applied Social Sciences
Project: Reflective Videography

Ng’s reflective videography project, which uses fast-forward drawing, explores the problems encountered by ethnic minorities living in Hong Kong, and directs attention to the issues they face. The video is designed to inspire social enterprises which will help ethnic minorities to address their problems.


Undergraduate Runner-up (Group)
NGAI On-chi, WONG Lok-yan, WU Ching-yan
Department of Media and Communication, Department of Chinese and History, Department of English
Project: Trust & Happiness: Kindergarten children and their parents

The project features a self-designed, life-size fairytale board game developed to increase the level of trust between parents and their children, and progressively strengthen their relationship. The initial target is kindergarten pupils.


Postgraduate Runner-up (Individual)
WONG Cheuk-kin
Department of Linguistics and Translation
Project: Production and Perception of Mandarin Sibilants by Cantonese Speakers

Cantonese speakers often find Putonghua sibilants (z c s, zh ch sh, j q x) difficult to distinguish and pronounce when learning Putonghua. To help Cantonese speakers overcome these difficulties, this project explores the production and perception of Putonghua sibilants, and the influence of Cantonese on Putonghua learning.


New Researcher Award

Dr CHAN Heng-choon Oliver
Department of Applied Social Sciences

The focus of Dr Chan’s research is sexual offenders and criminology in Asia. His articles, particularly on the subject of sexual homicide, have been extensively published in academic journals worldwide. His research explores the behaviour of sexual murderers, and has implications for police investigations in the form of offender profiling and crime prevention strategies. Chan also received The President’s Award 2017 of CityU.


Teaching Innovation Awards

Staff category


Dr Yanto CHANDRA
Department of Public Policy

Dr Chandra pursues process innovation in teaching and learning. This involves the use of “visual thinking” to deepen understanding (e.g. using flowcharts to visualise processes of solving social problems or conveying statistical concepts); “developing original content” about current affairs and relating them to concepts and theories; and results-oriented, motivational-driven “supervision techniques” to let students excel in their studies. Chandra’s research into teaching integration has resulted in course materials being developed into manga comics that can better engage students.


Dr CHONG Pui-man Melody
Department of Asian and International Studies

One of Dr Chong’s goals is to motivate students to create new and original ideas. She has developed teaching pedagogies to promote positive, flexible and interactive learning environments, and cultivate a spirit of adventure. Making mistakes is part of the learning process and thus self-reflection is encouraged. “I’m thinking of turning course assignments into Asian magazines for the course on pop culture, etc. Students will assume the role of journalists writing feature articles, and they will become more committed to the assignments,” Chong said


Research degree student category


HUA Congchao
Department of Linguistics and Translation

Ms Hua teaches GE1401 University English to freshmen from various disciplines. Under the course framework developed by current and previous coordinators of the course, Ms Hua enthusiastically delivered technology enhanced lectures, motivated peer collaboration, and interactive engagement. Students learn and practise the fundamentals of academic writing through collaborative learning and individual assignments, in which Ms Hua extensively engaged students by offering challenging and practical advice.


Daniel Madrid MORALES
Department of Media and Communication

Personalised learning, exploration and discovery, and technology, are the pillars of Daniel Madrid Morales’ teaching philosophy. Throughout the course of video production for the mass media, students fill in surveys on their mobile devices to let the teacher know about their needs and expectations. After completing the course, students build an online video portfolio to showcase their work. This includes video feature stories and long-form TV commercials for local businesses and NGOs. “I want them to be able to use various tools which help them grow professionally in the future,” he noted. “The assignments encourage students to engage with NGOs and social enterprises so that their work will have an impact on the community.”


Excellence in Knowledge Transfer Award

Dr LI Wanxin
Department of Public Policy
Project: 2016 Hong Kong Rugby Sevens Green Ambassador Scheme

Dr Li was the Principal Investigator and Advisor working closely with three Environmental Policy (ENP) students to design and execute the scheme, which was funded by the Campus Sustainability Fund. During the Hong Kong Rugby Sevens in April 2016, the three ENP students led a team of 35 student volunteers to promote recycling of plastic waste, conduct a waste audit, and complete a survey with spectators. The project was carried out in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Department and the Leisure and Cultural Services Department of the Hong Kong SAR Government. The scheme was selected as one of the flagship projects presented at the Climate Change Stakeholder Engagement Forum held by the Government in July 2016.


Certificate of Merit
Dr FUNG Lai-chu Annis
Department of Applied Social Sciences

The Essence of Chinese Martial Arts and Ethics programme is the first scientific study to use Chinese martial arts to reduce reactive and proactive aggressive behaviour in schoolchildren. High-risk children were selected to receive one of four types of intervention: martial arts skills only; martial arts ethics only; a combination of skills and ethics; or physical fitness only. The study’s findings suggest that the combination of martial arts skills and ethics show the greatest effectiveness in lessening aggressive behaviour compared to the other types of intervention.


Certificate of Merit
Dr Christoph A. HAFNER
Department of English
Project: Digital Multimedia Resource for Legal English: An interdisciplinary project

Dr Hafner’s interdisciplinary project is a digital multimedia resource providing insights into academic/ professional legal writing and oral advocacy. It combines the views of expert legal professionals with understanding derived from applied linguistics to produce an accessible video-based resource for the effective communication in legal English. The videos are available to the public at http://legalenglish.hk.

Champion of CLASS Mini Movie Competition for Secondary School Students

Gold Award: Hong Kong University Graduate Association College
Project: Into the Ditch

The video explores the subtle changes which occurred in the Wong Chuk Hang industrial zone after the MTR South Island Line came into service. “By shooting the movie, we acquired a more in-depth understanding of the community,” says team member Matthew WONG, a Secondary Four student. “The movie’s focus is the impact of the South Island Line on the business of various types of restaurants in the neighbourhood. We want to find out how the commercial expansion of big companies will affect small businesses. The restaurant operators featured in our movie were enthusiastic in sharing their thoughts, experiences, and memories. Their personal stories have touched me deeply,” says Wong.

Wong deepened his understanding of the community by participating in the movie shoot. But it also affected him personally. “I was always an introvert. This contest enabled me to get out of the classroom to explore the community. I guess it has helped me become more open-minded to try new things,” he notes.

Teacher Hody CHAN provided guidance throughout the shooting and production of the movie. “On our first outing, we encouraged the students to explore different facets of the society and find small stories in the community without taking a camera. They became engaged, and appreciated the mission to understand the community. After deciding on a focus, we looked into specific issues,” says Chan.