Lecture Series 2018/19


How to be a Productive Scholar in Social Science

Speaker:
Professor Tang Shui-Yan, Frances R and John J Duggan Professor in Public Administration, Sol Price School of Public Policy, University of Southern California
Date: Thursday, 4 April 2019
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Venue: G7619, 7/F, Green Zone, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong (Please use Lift 3)
Language: English

Abstract

Professor Tang will share his view on how to develop the habits and skills to be a productive scholar in social science. He will cover the following topics:

  1. how to maintain a productive research agenda as a junior faculty at a research university;
  2. how to overcome psychological obstacles for productive writing;
  3. how to write journal articles;
  4. how to handle the journal submission and revision process; and
  5. how to write research grant proposals.
Registration:
https://cityuhk.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6tg8mty9ag02H0F

Understanding Chengguan’s Soft Law Enforcement in China: a Dirty Institution Perspective

Speaker:
Dr Xu Jianhua, University of Macau
Date: Thursday, 28 March 2019
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Venue: G7619, 7/F, Green Zone, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong (Please use Lift 3)
Language: English

Abstract

China’s para-police chengguan’s violence towards street vendors has been widely reported. However, most of chengguan’s law enforcements involve no violence. Based on three years’ ethnographic work in Guangzhou and Guilin, this research reveals the mechanism by which the soft law enforcement is achieved. Dr Xu found that at the organizational level, chengguan adopted a strategy of five-dimensional liquid control to reduce street vendors’ resistance; at the individual level, a strategy of emotional law enforcement was widely practiced. Dr Xu argues that both liquid control and emotional law enforcement have their roots in chengguan’s identity as a “dirty institution” in China.

Registration:
https://cityuhk.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6eYMfP9pXeVI5oN

Sino-US Trade Relations and Global Political Pattern

Speaker:
Professor Chen Dingding, Professor of International Relations, Associate Dean of Institute for 21st Century Silk Road Studies, Jinan University, Guangzhou
Date: Thursday, 21 March 2019
Time: 10:30 am – 11:50 am
Venue: G7603, 7/F, Green Zone, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong (Please use Lift 2)
Language: English

Abstract

The dynamic of global powers and USA domestic politics have shaped the American perception of China and the Sino-US relation. In the era of Donald Trump, the Sino-US relation is in peril as US has been adopting negative attitudes and aggressive strategies against China, which led to the exacerbation of bilateral trade relation in 2018 and security tension concerning hotspot issues. However, since 2019, US seems to move towards a detente due to various domestic and international factors. The trade war against China has not solved the structural problems between the US and China, nor has it accomplished its strategic intention of containing China. What are the risks of Sino-US relations in the future? And how would they trigger the change of global politics? All these questions are the topics in this lecture.

Registration:
https://cityuhk.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_1TTQaYNx57uxyDj

Informal Institutions in the Chinese Bureaucracy: Reconceptualization and Reinterpretation

Speaker:
Professor Zhou Xueguang, Stanford University
Date: Friday, 15 March 2019
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Venue: G7619, 7/F, Green Zone, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong (Please use Lift 3)
Language: English

Abstract

Informal institutions—stable and informal patterns of bureaucratic behaviors—are prevalent in the Chinese bureaucracy and they play a critical role in the institutional logic of governance in China. In this study I develop an analytical framework, and related concepts and typologies, to make sense of such informal institutions in light of their relationships with formal institutions and bases of legitimacy. I use this analytical framework to reinterpret salient patterns of bureaucratic behavior in the literature (e.g., flexible implementation [變通], dual-track politics [雙軌政治], and collusion [共謀]) and discuss the mechanisms of their reproduction in contemporary China.

Registration:
https://cityuhk.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_a058y0nmC6o8shT

China’s Pursuit of ‘Soft Power’ in the Era of Donald Trump and Xi Jinping

Speaker:
Professor Stanley Rosen, Professor of Political Science, University of Southern California
Date: Monday, 11 March 2019
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Venue: G7619, 7/F, Green Zone, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong (Please use Lift 3)
Language: English

Abstract

Almost a decade ago a Chinese “Blue Book (lanpishu)” on soft power noted pessimistically that the United States held 43% of the soft power in the world while the European Union accounted for 34%. Excluding Japan and Australia, China and the rest of Asia was limited to less than 4%. Two years into the presidency of Donald Trump, the evidence of the decline in the American image internationally from multiple surveys is overwhelming. Has China has been able to reap the rewards from the American decline and, if so, are China’s gains sustainable?

China faces several almost insurmountable obstacles, some of which derive from a flawed concept and its measurement, and others which derive from China’s own priorities and its self-imposed constraints. Despite yearly spending of over 10 billion USD on soft power, China has repeatedly been willing to sacrifice short-terms gains in soft power in pursuit of higher priorities.

Registration:
https://cityuhk.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3zbXnnTwg6fFzX7

Taming Labour: Workers’ struggles, workplace unionism and collective bargaining on a Chinese waterfront

Speaker:
Dr Tim Pringle, Editor of The China Quarterly, and Senior Lecturer of the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, UK
Date: Friday, 9 November 2018
Time: 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Venue: G7619, 7/F, Green Zone, Yeung Kin Man Academic Building, City University of Hong Kong (Please use Lift 3)
Language: English

Abstract
Is worker representation in China possible? Do the rigid prohibitions against trade union organising outside of the Party-led All-China Federation of Trade Unions exclude the possibility of effective union representation? This seminar examines the case of the Yantian International Container Terminal (YICT) to consider under what conditions unions can provide effective workplace representation in China. I will argue that the YICT union developed a system of annual collective bargaining that tamed the power of militant dockworkers on the one hand and improved pay and conditions on the other. This outcome required an effective enterprise-level trade union that was nevertheless able to influence and manage members’ somewhat ambiguous acceptance of its role. Ultimately, workers’ interests were partially represented and their acquisition of associational power - in the form of trade unions - increased.

Registration:
https://bit.ly/2ODAYs3